Bioremediation of oil by marine microbial mats View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2002-12

AUTHORS

Yehuda Cohen

ABSTRACT

Cyanobacterial mats developing in oil-contaminated sabkhas along the African coasts of the Gulf of Suez and in the pristine Solar Lake, Sinai, were collected for laboratory studies. Samples of both mats showed efficient degradation of crude oil in the light, followed by development of an intense bloom of Phormidium spp. and Oscillatoria spp. Isolated cyanobacterial strains, however, did not degrade crude oil in axenic cultures. Strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria and aerobic heterotrophs were capable of degrading model compounds of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Results indicate that degradation of oil was done primarily by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. The oxygenic photosynthesis of oil-insensitive cyanobacteria supplied the molecular oxygen for the efficient aerobic metabolism of organisms, such as Marinobacter sp. The diurnal shifts in environmental conditions at the mat surface, from highly oxic conditions in the light to anaerobic sulfide-rich habitat in the dark, may allow the combined aerobic and anaerobic degradation of crude oil at the mat surface. Hence, coastal cyanobacterial mats may be used for the degradation of coastline oil spills. Oxygen microelectrodes detected a significant inhibition of photosynthetic activity subsequent to oil addition. This prevailed for a few hours and then rapidly recovered. In addition, shifts in bacterial community structure following exposure to oil were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified fractions of 16S rRNA from eubacteria, cyanobacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Since the mats used for the present study were obtained from oil-contaminated environments, they were believed to be preequilibrated for petroleum remediation. The mesocosm system at Eilat provided a unique opportunity to study petroleum degradation by mats formed under different salinities (up to 21%). These mats, dominated by cyanobacteria, can serve as close analogues to the sabkhas contaminated during the Gulf War in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. More... »

PAGES

189-193

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007587952

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12497184


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0605", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Microbiology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Biodegradation, Environmental", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Biofilms", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Biomass", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Cyanobacteria", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Petroleum", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Seawater", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Water Pollution, Chemical", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Hebrew University of Jerusalem", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.9619.7", 
          "name": [
            "Microbial and Molecular Ecology, Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram Campus, Jerusalem, Israel"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Cohen", 
        "givenName": "Yehuda", 
        "id": "sg:person.0704316717.78", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0704316717.78"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.66.11.5005-5012.2000", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007508936"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.68.4.1674-1683.2002", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1012803999"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.66.2.678-683.2000", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1014532126"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1093/nar/25.24.4907", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1016840441"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s002530051115", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1020148399", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s002530051115"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/0956-053x(95)00038-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021549319"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.66.11.5019-5023.2000", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1029773536"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.1999.tb00599.x", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041392614"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.1999.tb00599.x", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041392614"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/359109a0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050792560", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/359109a0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1099/00221287-116-2-485", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1060363506"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2002-12", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2002-12-01", 
    "description": "Cyanobacterial mats developing in oil-contaminated sabkhas along the African coasts of the Gulf of Suez and in the pristine Solar Lake, Sinai, were collected for laboratory studies. Samples of both mats showed efficient degradation of crude oil in the light, followed by development of an intense bloom of Phormidium spp. and Oscillatoria spp. Isolated cyanobacterial strains, however, did not degrade crude oil in axenic cultures. Strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria and aerobic heterotrophs were capable of degrading model compounds of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Results indicate that degradation of oil was done primarily by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. The oxygenic photosynthesis of oil-insensitive cyanobacteria supplied the molecular oxygen for the efficient aerobic metabolism of organisms, such as Marinobacter sp. The diurnal shifts in environmental conditions at the mat surface, from highly oxic conditions in the light to anaerobic sulfide-rich habitat in the dark, may allow the combined aerobic and anaerobic degradation of crude oil at the mat surface. Hence, coastal cyanobacterial mats may be used for the degradation of coastline oil spills. Oxygen microelectrodes detected a significant inhibition of photosynthetic activity subsequent to oil addition. This prevailed for a few hours and then rapidly recovered. In addition, shifts in bacterial community structure following exposure to oil were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified fractions of 16S rRNA from eubacteria, cyanobacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Since the mats used for the present study were obtained from oil-contaminated environments, they were believed to be preequilibrated for petroleum remediation. The mesocosm system at Eilat provided a unique opportunity to study petroleum degradation by mats formed under different salinities (up to 21%). These mats, dominated by cyanobacteria, can serve as close analogues to the sabkhas contaminated during the Gulf War in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia.", 
    "genre": "research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1099174", 
        "issn": [
          "1139-6709", 
          "1618-1905"
        ], 
        "name": "International Microbiology", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "4", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "5"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "Bioremediation of oil by marine microbial mats", 
    "pagination": "189-193", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "2424c9be05285977ef286a709d1a44af143ae7813be278043f4095c73af27162"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "pubmed_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "12497184"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nlm_unique_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "9816585"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1007587952"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007587952"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-11T10:20", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000348_0000000348/records_54334_00000000.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "http://link.springer.com/10.1007%2Fs10123-002-0089-5"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

129 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      46 URIs      28 LITERALS      16 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5 schema:about N483ce87454fd4e8da2b07a26fe128718
2 N60d296cd986b4e3cbfe550fef0f94eb6
3 N734741ff2c7a4294abdc100bb6a93a8b
4 Na0b3663895ce4f109fd9d1e165dda90b
5 Nb54936845a3c4730ab1342f9e98e15c0
6 Nb758fe2f12f043cb8322f3ef99d0cc7a
7 Nc9d778d418344a5cb7d27ccadc3d79b8
8 anzsrc-for:06
9 anzsrc-for:0605
10 schema:author N6a9901c0c5da43378b1ecafd98a5778c
11 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/s002530051115
12 sg:pub.10.1038/359109a0
13 https://doi.org/10.1016/0956-053x(95)00038-2
14 https://doi.org/10.1093/nar/25.24.4907
15 https://doi.org/10.1099/00221287-116-2-485
16 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.1999.tb00599.x
17 https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.66.11.5005-5012.2000
18 https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.66.11.5019-5023.2000
19 https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.66.2.678-683.2000
20 https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.68.4.1674-1683.2002
21 schema:datePublished 2002-12
22 schema:datePublishedReg 2002-12-01
23 schema:description Cyanobacterial mats developing in oil-contaminated sabkhas along the African coasts of the Gulf of Suez and in the pristine Solar Lake, Sinai, were collected for laboratory studies. Samples of both mats showed efficient degradation of crude oil in the light, followed by development of an intense bloom of Phormidium spp. and Oscillatoria spp. Isolated cyanobacterial strains, however, did not degrade crude oil in axenic cultures. Strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria and aerobic heterotrophs were capable of degrading model compounds of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. Results indicate that degradation of oil was done primarily by aerobic heterotrophic bacteria. The oxygenic photosynthesis of oil-insensitive cyanobacteria supplied the molecular oxygen for the efficient aerobic metabolism of organisms, such as Marinobacter sp. The diurnal shifts in environmental conditions at the mat surface, from highly oxic conditions in the light to anaerobic sulfide-rich habitat in the dark, may allow the combined aerobic and anaerobic degradation of crude oil at the mat surface. Hence, coastal cyanobacterial mats may be used for the degradation of coastline oil spills. Oxygen microelectrodes detected a significant inhibition of photosynthetic activity subsequent to oil addition. This prevailed for a few hours and then rapidly recovered. In addition, shifts in bacterial community structure following exposure to oil were determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified fractions of 16S rRNA from eubacteria, cyanobacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Since the mats used for the present study were obtained from oil-contaminated environments, they were believed to be preequilibrated for petroleum remediation. The mesocosm system at Eilat provided a unique opportunity to study petroleum degradation by mats formed under different salinities (up to 21%). These mats, dominated by cyanobacteria, can serve as close analogues to the sabkhas contaminated during the Gulf War in Kuwait and Saudi Arabia.
24 schema:genre research_article
25 schema:inLanguage en
26 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
27 schema:isPartOf N0b41765279e4447ca00484b3a2cb0035
28 N790dfbb30e31483db1a9e7cbbfe1f167
29 sg:journal.1099174
30 schema:name Bioremediation of oil by marine microbial mats
31 schema:pagination 189-193
32 schema:productId N7938ebe175b24771a7515c0546a4795a
33 N7c6d3deb89fb46058a960a7663850aa2
34 N8bb84f4aae984d5cb05185c1a40a70b5
35 Nc4ac7e95763045ae884ded52c6344288
36 Ndc12a5591f384e6e8a235d4f9db8692e
37 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007587952
38 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5
39 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-11T10:20
40 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
41 schema:sdPublisher N4742e9d1c75b4b42917b3f355d19bd96
42 schema:url http://link.springer.com/10.1007%2Fs10123-002-0089-5
43 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
44 sgo:sdDataset articles
45 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
46 N0b41765279e4447ca00484b3a2cb0035 schema:issueNumber 4
47 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
48 N4742e9d1c75b4b42917b3f355d19bd96 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
49 rdf:type schema:Organization
50 N483ce87454fd4e8da2b07a26fe128718 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
51 schema:name Biomass
52 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
53 N60d296cd986b4e3cbfe550fef0f94eb6 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
54 schema:name Biofilms
55 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
56 N6a9901c0c5da43378b1ecafd98a5778c rdf:first sg:person.0704316717.78
57 rdf:rest rdf:nil
58 N734741ff2c7a4294abdc100bb6a93a8b schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
59 schema:name Biodegradation, Environmental
60 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
61 N790dfbb30e31483db1a9e7cbbfe1f167 schema:volumeNumber 5
62 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
63 N7938ebe175b24771a7515c0546a4795a schema:name readcube_id
64 schema:value 2424c9be05285977ef286a709d1a44af143ae7813be278043f4095c73af27162
65 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
66 N7c6d3deb89fb46058a960a7663850aa2 schema:name doi
67 schema:value 10.1007/s10123-002-0089-5
68 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
69 N8bb84f4aae984d5cb05185c1a40a70b5 schema:name nlm_unique_id
70 schema:value 9816585
71 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
72 Na0b3663895ce4f109fd9d1e165dda90b schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
73 schema:name Cyanobacteria
74 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
75 Nb54936845a3c4730ab1342f9e98e15c0 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
76 schema:name Seawater
77 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
78 Nb758fe2f12f043cb8322f3ef99d0cc7a schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
79 schema:name Petroleum
80 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
81 Nc4ac7e95763045ae884ded52c6344288 schema:name pubmed_id
82 schema:value 12497184
83 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
84 Nc9d778d418344a5cb7d27ccadc3d79b8 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
85 schema:name Water Pollution, Chemical
86 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
87 Ndc12a5591f384e6e8a235d4f9db8692e schema:name dimensions_id
88 schema:value pub.1007587952
89 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
90 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
91 schema:name Biological Sciences
92 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
93 anzsrc-for:0605 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
94 schema:name Microbiology
95 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
96 sg:journal.1099174 schema:issn 1139-6709
97 1618-1905
98 schema:name International Microbiology
99 rdf:type schema:Periodical
100 sg:person.0704316717.78 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.9619.7
101 schema:familyName Cohen
102 schema:givenName Yehuda
103 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0704316717.78
104 rdf:type schema:Person
105 sg:pub.10.1007/s002530051115 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1020148399
106 https://doi.org/10.1007/s002530051115
107 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
108 sg:pub.10.1038/359109a0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050792560
109 https://doi.org/10.1038/359109a0
110 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
111 https://doi.org/10.1016/0956-053x(95)00038-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021549319
112 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
113 https://doi.org/10.1093/nar/25.24.4907 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1016840441
114 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
115 https://doi.org/10.1099/00221287-116-2-485 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1060363506
116 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
117 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1574-6941.1999.tb00599.x schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041392614
118 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
119 https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.66.11.5005-5012.2000 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007508936
120 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
121 https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.66.11.5019-5023.2000 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1029773536
122 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
123 https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.66.2.678-683.2000 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1014532126
124 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
125 https://doi.org/10.1128/aem.68.4.1674-1683.2002 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1012803999
126 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
127 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.9619.7 schema:alternateName Hebrew University of Jerusalem
128 schema:name Microbial and Molecular Ecology, Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Givat Ram Campus, Jerusalem, Israel
129 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...