Groundwater recharge and chemical evolution in the southern High Plains of Texas, USA View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2001-12

AUTHORS

Alan E. Fryar, William F. Mullican, Stephen A. Macko

ABSTRACT

. The unconfined High Plains (Ogallala) aquifer is the largest aquifer in the USA and the primary water supply for the semiarid southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico. Analyses of water and soils northeast of Amarillo, Texas, together with data from other regional studies, indicate that processes during recharge control the composition of unconfined groundwater in the northern half of the southern High Plains. Solute and isotopic data are consistent with a sequence of episodic precipitation, concentration of solutes in upland soils by evapotranspiration, runoff, and infiltration beneath playas and ditches (modified locally by return flow of wastewater and irrigation tailwater). Plausible reactions during recharge include oxidation of organic matter, dissolution and exsolution of CO2, dissolution of CaCO3, silicate weathering, and cation exchange. Si and 14C data suggest leakage from perched aquifers to the High Plains aquifer. Plausible mass-balance models for the High Plains aquifer include scenarios of flow with leakage but not reactions, flow with reactions but not leakage, and flow with neither reactions nor leakage. Mechanisms of recharge and chemical evolution delineated in this study agree with those noted for other aquifers in the south-central and southwestern USA. More... »

PAGES

522-542

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039990586


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/04", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Earth Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0406", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Geological Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0053, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.266539.d", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Geological Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0053, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Fryar", 
        "givenName": "Alan E.", 
        "id": "sg:person.016257270002.99", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.016257270002.99"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Texas Water Development Board, P.O. Box 13231, Austin, Texas 78711-3231, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.467917.a", 
          "name": [
            "Texas Water Development Board, P.O. Box 13231, Austin, Texas 78711-3231, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Mullican", 
        "givenName": "William F.", 
        "id": "sg:person.012672652063.05", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.012672652063.05"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.27755.32", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Macko", 
        "givenName": "Stephen A.", 
        "id": "sg:person.013256350705.53", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013256350705.53"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2001-12", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2001-12-01", 
    "description": "Abstract. The unconfined High Plains (Ogallala) aquifer is the largest aquifer in the USA and the primary water supply for the semiarid southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico. Analyses of water and soils northeast of Amarillo, Texas, together with data from other regional studies, indicate that processes during recharge control the composition of unconfined groundwater in the northern half of the southern High Plains. Solute and isotopic data are consistent with a sequence of episodic precipitation, concentration of solutes in upland soils by evapotranspiration, runoff, and infiltration beneath playas and ditches (modified locally by return flow of wastewater and irrigation tailwater). Plausible reactions during recharge include oxidation of organic matter, dissolution and exsolution of CO2, dissolution of CaCO3, silicate weathering, and cation exchange. Si and 14C data suggest leakage from perched aquifers to the High Plains aquifer. Plausible mass-balance models for the High Plains aquifer include scenarios of flow with leakage but not reactions, flow with reactions but not leakage, and flow with neither reactions nor leakage. Mechanisms of recharge and chemical evolution delineated in this study agree with those noted for other aquifers in the south-central and southwestern USA.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1047968", 
        "issn": [
          "1431-2174", 
          "1435-0157"
        ], 
        "name": "Hydrogeology Journal", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "6", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "9"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "High Plains aquifer", 
      "Southern High Plains", 
      "Plains aquifer", 
      "High Plains", 
      "chemical evolution", 
      "semiarid Southern High Plains", 
      "exsolution of CO2", 
      "mechanism of recharge", 
      "dissolution of CaCO3", 
      "primary water supply", 
      "mass balance model", 
      "scenarios of flows", 
      "episodic precipitation", 
      "isotopic data", 
      "silicate weathering", 
      "unconfined groundwater", 
      "analysis of water", 
      "large aquifers", 
      "northern half", 
      "aquifer", 
      "organic matter", 
      "recharge", 
      "southwestern USA", 
      "regional studies", 
      "New Mexico", 
      "Plain", 
      "water supply", 
      "concentration of solute", 
      "cation exchange", 
      "groundwater", 
      "dissolution", 
      "Texas", 
      "USA", 
      "playas", 
      "weathering", 
      "runoff", 
      "exsolution", 
      "evapotranspiration", 
      "evolution", 
      "precipitation", 
      "upland", 
      "ditches", 
      "CaCO3", 
      "Mexico", 
      "water", 
      "CO2", 
      "data", 
      "Amarillo", 
      "composition", 
      "matter", 
      "flow", 
      "plausible reactions", 
      "supply", 
      "scenarios", 
      "exchange", 
      "solutes", 
      "infiltration", 
      "concentration", 
      "sequence", 
      "leakage", 
      "model", 
      "Si", 
      "process", 
      "half", 
      "oxidation", 
      "study", 
      "analysis", 
      "mechanism", 
      "reaction"
    ], 
    "name": "Groundwater recharge and chemical evolution in the southern High Plains of Texas, USA", 
    "pagination": "522-542", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1039990586"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039990586"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-12-01T06:22", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221201/entities/gbq_results/article/article_305.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

146 TRIPLES      20 PREDICATES      94 URIs      86 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9 schema:about anzsrc-for:04
2 anzsrc-for:0406
3 schema:author N45810a7a47794467ac95ff2218e0cce6
4 schema:datePublished 2001-12
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2001-12-01
6 schema:description Abstract. The unconfined High Plains (Ogallala) aquifer is the largest aquifer in the USA and the primary water supply for the semiarid southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico. Analyses of water and soils northeast of Amarillo, Texas, together with data from other regional studies, indicate that processes during recharge control the composition of unconfined groundwater in the northern half of the southern High Plains. Solute and isotopic data are consistent with a sequence of episodic precipitation, concentration of solutes in upland soils by evapotranspiration, runoff, and infiltration beneath playas and ditches (modified locally by return flow of wastewater and irrigation tailwater). Plausible reactions during recharge include oxidation of organic matter, dissolution and exsolution of CO2, dissolution of CaCO3, silicate weathering, and cation exchange. Si and 14C data suggest leakage from perched aquifers to the High Plains aquifer. Plausible mass-balance models for the High Plains aquifer include scenarios of flow with leakage but not reactions, flow with reactions but not leakage, and flow with neither reactions nor leakage. Mechanisms of recharge and chemical evolution delineated in this study agree with those noted for other aquifers in the south-central and southwestern USA.
7 schema:genre article
8 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
9 schema:isPartOf N34c320a5eb7d4424a8579909f50194bd
10 Ndfc8c2021d2c4f58b787c2c8a77cc209
11 sg:journal.1047968
12 schema:keywords Amarillo
13 CO2
14 CaCO3
15 High Plains
16 High Plains aquifer
17 Mexico
18 New Mexico
19 Plain
20 Plains aquifer
21 Si
22 Southern High Plains
23 Texas
24 USA
25 analysis
26 analysis of water
27 aquifer
28 cation exchange
29 chemical evolution
30 composition
31 concentration
32 concentration of solute
33 data
34 dissolution
35 dissolution of CaCO3
36 ditches
37 episodic precipitation
38 evapotranspiration
39 evolution
40 exchange
41 exsolution
42 exsolution of CO2
43 flow
44 groundwater
45 half
46 infiltration
47 isotopic data
48 large aquifers
49 leakage
50 mass balance model
51 matter
52 mechanism
53 mechanism of recharge
54 model
55 northern half
56 organic matter
57 oxidation
58 plausible reactions
59 playas
60 precipitation
61 primary water supply
62 process
63 reaction
64 recharge
65 regional studies
66 runoff
67 scenarios
68 scenarios of flows
69 semiarid Southern High Plains
70 sequence
71 silicate weathering
72 solutes
73 southwestern USA
74 study
75 supply
76 unconfined groundwater
77 upland
78 water
79 water supply
80 weathering
81 schema:name Groundwater recharge and chemical evolution in the southern High Plains of Texas, USA
82 schema:pagination 522-542
83 schema:productId N449dbe40b27f4fd2a68795d4242a6379
84 Nd2468878f18d4573a01c1ea9ff7f7926
85 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039990586
86 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9
87 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-12-01T06:22
88 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
89 schema:sdPublisher N9b3b3779ee4e4ece8c04e035657bd2ec
90 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9
91 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
92 sgo:sdDataset articles
93 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
94 N1f3f699cc00247fe84eff5af611f63d5 rdf:first sg:person.013256350705.53
95 rdf:rest rdf:nil
96 N34c320a5eb7d4424a8579909f50194bd schema:volumeNumber 9
97 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
98 N449dbe40b27f4fd2a68795d4242a6379 schema:name doi
99 schema:value 10.1007/s10040-001-0161-9
100 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
101 N45810a7a47794467ac95ff2218e0cce6 rdf:first sg:person.016257270002.99
102 rdf:rest N8eae10a2c09d4105923f1b7b4437520c
103 N8eae10a2c09d4105923f1b7b4437520c rdf:first sg:person.012672652063.05
104 rdf:rest N1f3f699cc00247fe84eff5af611f63d5
105 N9b3b3779ee4e4ece8c04e035657bd2ec schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
106 rdf:type schema:Organization
107 Nd2468878f18d4573a01c1ea9ff7f7926 schema:name dimensions_id
108 schema:value pub.1039990586
109 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
110 Ndfc8c2021d2c4f58b787c2c8a77cc209 schema:issueNumber 6
111 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
112 anzsrc-for:04 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
113 schema:name Earth Sciences
114 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
115 anzsrc-for:0406 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
116 schema:name Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
117 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
118 sg:journal.1047968 schema:issn 1431-2174
119 1435-0157
120 schema:name Hydrogeology Journal
121 schema:publisher Springer Nature
122 rdf:type schema:Periodical
123 sg:person.012672652063.05 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.467917.a
124 schema:familyName Mullican
125 schema:givenName William F.
126 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.012672652063.05
127 rdf:type schema:Person
128 sg:person.013256350705.53 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.27755.32
129 schema:familyName Macko
130 schema:givenName Stephen A.
131 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013256350705.53
132 rdf:type schema:Person
133 sg:person.016257270002.99 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.266539.d
134 schema:familyName Fryar
135 schema:givenName Alan E.
136 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.016257270002.99
137 rdf:type schema:Person
138 grid-institutes:grid.266539.d schema:alternateName Department of Geological Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0053, USA
139 schema:name Department of Geological Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0053, USA
140 rdf:type schema:Organization
141 grid-institutes:grid.27755.32 schema:alternateName Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, USA
142 schema:name Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903, USA
143 rdf:type schema:Organization
144 grid-institutes:grid.467917.a schema:alternateName Texas Water Development Board, P.O. Box 13231, Austin, Texas 78711-3231, USA
145 schema:name Texas Water Development Board, P.O. Box 13231, Austin, Texas 78711-3231, USA
146 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...