The influence of the land surface on the transition from dry to wet season in Amazonia View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2004-06

AUTHORS

R. Fu, W. Li

ABSTRACT

Analysis of the fifteen years of European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis suggests that the transition from dry to wet season in Southern Amazonia is initially driven by increases of surface latent heat flux. These fluxes rapidly reduce Convective Inhibition Energy (CINE) and increase Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), consequently providing favourable conditions for increased rainfall even before the large-scale circulation has changed. The increase of rainfall presumably initiates the reversal of the cross-equatorial flow, leading to large-scale net moisture convergence over Southern Amazonia. An analysis of early and late wet season onsets on an interannual scale shows that a longer dry season with lower rainfall reduces surface latent heat flux in the dry and earlier transition periods compared to that of a normal wet season onset. These conditions result in a higher CINE and a lower CAPE, causing a delay in the increase of local rainfall in the initiating phase of the transition and consequently in the wet season onset. Conversely, a wetter dry season leads to a higher surface latent heat flux and weaker CINE, providing a necessary condition for an earlier increase of local rainfall and an earlier wet season onset. Our results imply that if land use change in Amazonia reduces rainfall during dry and transition seasons, it could significantly delay the wet season onset and prolong the dry season. More... »

PAGES

97-110

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024042648


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0401", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Atmospheric Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/04", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Earth Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Georgia Institute of Technology", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.213917.f", 
          "name": [
            "School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, GA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Fu", 
        "givenName": "R.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Georgia Institute of Technology", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.213917.f", 
          "name": [
            "School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, GA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Li", 
        "givenName": "W.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2004-06", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2004-06-01", 
    "description": "Analysis of the fifteen years of European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis suggests that the transition from dry to wet season in Southern Amazonia is initially driven by increases of surface latent heat flux. These fluxes rapidly reduce Convective Inhibition Energy (CINE) and increase Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), consequently providing favourable conditions for increased rainfall even before the large-scale circulation has changed. The increase of rainfall presumably initiates the reversal of the cross-equatorial flow, leading to large-scale net moisture convergence over Southern Amazonia. An analysis of early and late wet season onsets on an interannual scale shows that a longer dry season with lower rainfall reduces surface latent heat flux in the dry and earlier transition periods compared to that of a normal wet season onset. These conditions result in a higher CINE and a lower CAPE, causing a delay in the increase of local rainfall in the initiating phase of the transition and consequently in the wet season onset. Conversely, a wetter dry season leads to a higher surface latent heat flux and weaker CINE, providing a necessary condition for an earlier increase of local rainfall and an earlier wet season onset. Our results imply that if land use change in Amazonia reduces rainfall during dry and transition seasons, it could significantly delay the wet season onset and prolong the dry season.", 
    "genre": "research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": true, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1086664", 
        "issn": [
          "0177-798X", 
          "1434-4483"
        ], 
        "name": "Theoretical and Applied Climatology", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "1-3", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "78"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "The influence of the land surface on the transition from dry to wet season in Amazonia", 
    "pagination": "97-110", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "728b1d704daf51476a25209a35bccf88fe05a5f605f4281f30c5f49e4428b92a"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1024042648"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024042648"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-10T14:01", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000001_0000000264/records_8660_00000481.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

66 TRIPLES      20 PREDICATES      27 URIs      19 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7 schema:about anzsrc-for:04
2 anzsrc-for:0401
3 schema:author N86167207d5254c1f8ff550db70060b37
4 schema:datePublished 2004-06
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2004-06-01
6 schema:description Analysis of the fifteen years of European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis suggests that the transition from dry to wet season in Southern Amazonia is initially driven by increases of surface latent heat flux. These fluxes rapidly reduce Convective Inhibition Energy (CINE) and increase Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), consequently providing favourable conditions for increased rainfall even before the large-scale circulation has changed. The increase of rainfall presumably initiates the reversal of the cross-equatorial flow, leading to large-scale net moisture convergence over Southern Amazonia. An analysis of early and late wet season onsets on an interannual scale shows that a longer dry season with lower rainfall reduces surface latent heat flux in the dry and earlier transition periods compared to that of a normal wet season onset. These conditions result in a higher CINE and a lower CAPE, causing a delay in the increase of local rainfall in the initiating phase of the transition and consequently in the wet season onset. Conversely, a wetter dry season leads to a higher surface latent heat flux and weaker CINE, providing a necessary condition for an earlier increase of local rainfall and an earlier wet season onset. Our results imply that if land use change in Amazonia reduces rainfall during dry and transition seasons, it could significantly delay the wet season onset and prolong the dry season.
7 schema:genre research_article
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:isAccessibleForFree true
10 schema:isPartOf N45a3db801d1040e0b3ef7f0c6500db68
11 Nde2ce97bad014077b973b59f39e25894
12 sg:journal.1086664
13 schema:name The influence of the land surface on the transition from dry to wet season in Amazonia
14 schema:pagination 97-110
15 schema:productId N25699346a8454710bb601054ba26c0ea
16 N4cb6ad49ab9843e39dedc47384353f46
17 Nce10cadbd9494578bce7b2f7a76150c9
18 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024042648
19 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7
20 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-10T14:01
21 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
22 schema:sdPublisher Na8469e4beac747dda1c3ba94d4f0cc93
23 schema:url http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7
24 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
25 sgo:sdDataset articles
26 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
27 N25699346a8454710bb601054ba26c0ea schema:name readcube_id
28 schema:value 728b1d704daf51476a25209a35bccf88fe05a5f605f4281f30c5f49e4428b92a
29 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
30 N45a3db801d1040e0b3ef7f0c6500db68 schema:issueNumber 1-3
31 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
32 N4cb6ad49ab9843e39dedc47384353f46 schema:name doi
33 schema:value 10.1007/s00704-004-0046-7
34 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
35 N86167207d5254c1f8ff550db70060b37 rdf:first N9cec6e5ed50148898244a236066f776f
36 rdf:rest Na04c91aef6fb45e5ab26d3864b53869f
37 N9cec6e5ed50148898244a236066f776f schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.213917.f
38 schema:familyName Fu
39 schema:givenName R.
40 rdf:type schema:Person
41 Na04c91aef6fb45e5ab26d3864b53869f rdf:first Nac6eb473a41e4b13808af9b89620c18e
42 rdf:rest rdf:nil
43 Na8469e4beac747dda1c3ba94d4f0cc93 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
44 rdf:type schema:Organization
45 Nac6eb473a41e4b13808af9b89620c18e schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.213917.f
46 schema:familyName Li
47 schema:givenName W.
48 rdf:type schema:Person
49 Nce10cadbd9494578bce7b2f7a76150c9 schema:name dimensions_id
50 schema:value pub.1024042648
51 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
52 Nde2ce97bad014077b973b59f39e25894 schema:volumeNumber 78
53 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
54 anzsrc-for:04 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
55 schema:name Earth Sciences
56 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
57 anzsrc-for:0401 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
58 schema:name Atmospheric Sciences
59 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
60 sg:journal.1086664 schema:issn 0177-798X
61 1434-4483
62 schema:name Theoretical and Applied Climatology
63 rdf:type schema:Periodical
64 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.213917.f schema:alternateName Georgia Institute of Technology
65 schema:name School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, GA, USA
66 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...