Linear Elastic and Cohesive Fracture Analysis to Model Hydraulic Fracture in Brittle and Ductile Rocks View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2011-12-07

AUTHORS

Yao Yao

ABSTRACT

Hydraulic fracturing technology is being widely used within the oil and gas industry for both waste injection and unconventional gas production wells. It is essential to predict the behavior of hydraulic fractures accurately based on understanding the fundamental mechanism(s). The prevailing approach for hydraulic fracture modeling continues to rely on computational methods based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Generally, these methods give reasonable predictions for hard rock hydraulic fracture processes, but still have inherent limitations, especially when fluid injection is performed in soft rock/sand or other non-conventional formations. These methods typically give very conservative predictions on fracture geometry and inaccurate estimation of required fracture pressure. One of the reasons the LEFM-based methods fail to give accurate predictions for these materials is that the fracture process zone ahead of the crack tip and softening effect should not be neglected in ductile rock fracture analysis. A 3D pore pressure cohesive zone model has been developed and applied to predict hydraulic fracturing under fluid injection. The cohesive zone method is a numerical tool developed to model crack initiation and growth in quasi-brittle materials considering the material softening effect. The pore pressure cohesive zone model has been applied to investigate the hydraulic fracture with different rock properties. The hydraulic fracture predictions of a three-layer water injection case have been compared using the pore pressure cohesive zone model with revised parameters, LEFM-based pseudo 3D model, a Perkins-Kern–Nordgren (PKN) model, and an analytical solution. Based on the size of the fracture process zone and its effect on crack extension in ductile rock, the fundamental mechanical difference of LEFM and cohesive fracture mechanics-based methods is discussed. An effective fracture toughness method has been proposed to consider the fracture process zone effect on the ductile rock fracture. More... »

PAGES

375-387

References to SciGraph publications

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049606654


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/09", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Engineering", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0912", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Materials Engineering", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0914", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, TX, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.421234.2", 
          "name": [
            "ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, TX, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Yao", 
        "givenName": "Yao", 
        "id": "sg:person.011313423711.63", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.011313423711.63"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1023/a:1023968010028", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033373041", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1023968010028"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf01148768", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1040203587", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01148768"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10704-007-9156-4", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1020917882", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10704-007-9156-4"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10704-006-7153-7", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1040638369", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10704-006-7153-7"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2011-12-07", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2011-12-07", 
    "description": "Hydraulic fracturing technology is being widely used within the oil and gas industry for both waste injection and unconventional gas production wells. It is essential to predict the behavior of hydraulic fractures accurately based on understanding the fundamental mechanism(s). The prevailing approach for hydraulic fracture modeling continues to rely on computational methods based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Generally, these methods give reasonable predictions for hard rock hydraulic fracture processes, but still have inherent limitations, especially when fluid injection is performed in soft rock/sand or other non-conventional formations. These methods typically give very conservative predictions on fracture geometry and inaccurate estimation of required fracture pressure. One of the reasons the LEFM-based methods fail to give accurate predictions for these materials is that the fracture process zone ahead of the crack tip and softening effect should not be neglected in ductile rock fracture analysis. A 3D pore pressure cohesive zone model has been developed and applied to predict hydraulic fracturing under fluid injection. The cohesive zone method is a numerical tool developed to model crack initiation and growth in quasi-brittle materials considering the material softening effect. The pore pressure cohesive zone model has been applied to investigate the hydraulic fracture with different rock properties. The hydraulic fracture predictions of a three-layer water injection case have been compared using the pore pressure cohesive zone model with revised parameters, LEFM-based pseudo 3D model, a Perkins-Kern\u2013Nordgren (PKN) model, and an analytical solution. Based on the size of the fracture process zone and its effect on crack extension in ductile rock, the fundamental mechanical difference of LEFM and cohesive fracture mechanics-based methods is discussed. An effective fracture toughness method has been proposed to consider the fracture process zone effect on the ductile rock fracture.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1052698", 
        "issn": [
          "0723-2632", 
          "1434-453X"
        ], 
        "name": "Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "3", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "45"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "linear elastic fracture mechanics", 
      "pore pressure cohesive zone model", 
      "cohesive zone model", 
      "fracture process zone", 
      "hydraulic fractures", 
      "zone model", 
      "process zone", 
      "fracture analysis", 
      "fracture mechanics-based method", 
      "fracture process zone effects", 
      "fluid injection", 
      "water injection case", 
      "cohesive zone method", 
      "hydraulic fracture modeling", 
      "elastic fracture mechanics", 
      "hydraulic fracture process", 
      "quasi-brittle materials", 
      "hydraulic fracturing technology", 
      "fracture toughness method", 
      "gas production wells", 
      "rock fracture analysis", 
      "different rock properties", 
      "pseudo-3D model", 
      "ductile rocks", 
      "mechanics-based method", 
      "fracturing technology", 
      "fracture mechanics", 
      "fracture process", 
      "crack extension", 
      "fracture modeling", 
      "linear elastic", 
      "crack tip", 
      "Perkins-Kern", 
      "fracture pressure", 
      "fracture geometry", 
      "waste injection", 
      "injection case", 
      "hydraulic fracturing", 
      "Nordgren (PKN) model", 
      "production wells", 
      "rock fractures", 
      "conservative predictions", 
      "numerical tool", 
      "gas industry", 
      "rock properties", 
      "analytical solution", 
      "fracture prediction", 
      "zone effect", 
      "reasonable predictions", 
      "mechanical differences", 
      "zone method", 
      "accurate prediction", 
      "inaccurate estimation", 
      "materials", 
      "Revised parameters", 
      "brittle", 
      "fractures", 
      "prevailing approach", 
      "fracturing", 
      "prediction", 
      "method", 
      "inherent limitations", 
      "zone", 
      "sand", 
      "model", 
      "mechanics", 
      "modeling", 
      "oil", 
      "elastics", 
      "geometry", 
      "properties", 
      "rocks", 
      "computational methods", 
      "technology", 
      "tip", 
      "parameters", 
      "estimation", 
      "wells", 
      "effect", 
      "industry", 
      "solution", 
      "pressure", 
      "behavior", 
      "process", 
      "size", 
      "analysis", 
      "injection", 
      "formation", 
      "limitations", 
      "approach", 
      "tool", 
      "extension", 
      "growth", 
      "reasons", 
      "initiation", 
      "cases", 
      "differences"
    ], 
    "name": "Linear Elastic and Cohesive Fracture Analysis to Model Hydraulic Fracture in Brittle and Ductile Rocks", 
    "pagination": "375-387", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1049606654"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049606654"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-12-01T06:29", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221201/entities/gbq_results/article/article_547.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

174 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      126 URIs      113 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0 schema:about anzsrc-for:09
2 anzsrc-for:0912
3 anzsrc-for:0914
4 schema:author N6fb0913466ce40269ed95440d35537fe
5 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/bf01148768
6 sg:pub.10.1007/s10704-006-7153-7
7 sg:pub.10.1007/s10704-007-9156-4
8 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1023968010028
9 schema:datePublished 2011-12-07
10 schema:datePublishedReg 2011-12-07
11 schema:description Hydraulic fracturing technology is being widely used within the oil and gas industry for both waste injection and unconventional gas production wells. It is essential to predict the behavior of hydraulic fractures accurately based on understanding the fundamental mechanism(s). The prevailing approach for hydraulic fracture modeling continues to rely on computational methods based on Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Generally, these methods give reasonable predictions for hard rock hydraulic fracture processes, but still have inherent limitations, especially when fluid injection is performed in soft rock/sand or other non-conventional formations. These methods typically give very conservative predictions on fracture geometry and inaccurate estimation of required fracture pressure. One of the reasons the LEFM-based methods fail to give accurate predictions for these materials is that the fracture process zone ahead of the crack tip and softening effect should not be neglected in ductile rock fracture analysis. A 3D pore pressure cohesive zone model has been developed and applied to predict hydraulic fracturing under fluid injection. The cohesive zone method is a numerical tool developed to model crack initiation and growth in quasi-brittle materials considering the material softening effect. The pore pressure cohesive zone model has been applied to investigate the hydraulic fracture with different rock properties. The hydraulic fracture predictions of a three-layer water injection case have been compared using the pore pressure cohesive zone model with revised parameters, LEFM-based pseudo 3D model, a Perkins-Kern–Nordgren (PKN) model, and an analytical solution. Based on the size of the fracture process zone and its effect on crack extension in ductile rock, the fundamental mechanical difference of LEFM and cohesive fracture mechanics-based methods is discussed. An effective fracture toughness method has been proposed to consider the fracture process zone effect on the ductile rock fracture.
12 schema:genre article
13 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
14 schema:isPartOf N418c98681fee4e72b0b397f9b0b7a92a
15 N7c259479480d4f6f86ee0ea88545977c
16 sg:journal.1052698
17 schema:keywords Nordgren (PKN) model
18 Perkins-Kern
19 Revised parameters
20 accurate prediction
21 analysis
22 analytical solution
23 approach
24 behavior
25 brittle
26 cases
27 cohesive zone method
28 cohesive zone model
29 computational methods
30 conservative predictions
31 crack extension
32 crack tip
33 differences
34 different rock properties
35 ductile rocks
36 effect
37 elastic fracture mechanics
38 elastics
39 estimation
40 extension
41 fluid injection
42 formation
43 fracture analysis
44 fracture geometry
45 fracture mechanics
46 fracture mechanics-based method
47 fracture modeling
48 fracture prediction
49 fracture pressure
50 fracture process
51 fracture process zone
52 fracture process zone effects
53 fracture toughness method
54 fractures
55 fracturing
56 fracturing technology
57 gas industry
58 gas production wells
59 geometry
60 growth
61 hydraulic fracture modeling
62 hydraulic fracture process
63 hydraulic fractures
64 hydraulic fracturing
65 hydraulic fracturing technology
66 inaccurate estimation
67 industry
68 inherent limitations
69 initiation
70 injection
71 injection case
72 limitations
73 linear elastic
74 linear elastic fracture mechanics
75 materials
76 mechanical differences
77 mechanics
78 mechanics-based method
79 method
80 model
81 modeling
82 numerical tool
83 oil
84 parameters
85 pore pressure cohesive zone model
86 prediction
87 pressure
88 prevailing approach
89 process
90 process zone
91 production wells
92 properties
93 pseudo-3D model
94 quasi-brittle materials
95 reasonable predictions
96 reasons
97 rock fracture analysis
98 rock fractures
99 rock properties
100 rocks
101 sand
102 size
103 solution
104 technology
105 tip
106 tool
107 waste injection
108 water injection case
109 wells
110 zone
111 zone effect
112 zone method
113 zone model
114 schema:name Linear Elastic and Cohesive Fracture Analysis to Model Hydraulic Fracture in Brittle and Ductile Rocks
115 schema:pagination 375-387
116 schema:productId N895710a912544fae8e97bd07641ffd94
117 Nd20935c30c4b4b3ca074a4290f96adb1
118 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049606654
119 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0
120 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-12-01T06:29
121 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
122 schema:sdPublisher N8f9ab8dca38a4813bbb3170d24179126
123 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0
124 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
125 sgo:sdDataset articles
126 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
127 N418c98681fee4e72b0b397f9b0b7a92a schema:issueNumber 3
128 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
129 N6fb0913466ce40269ed95440d35537fe rdf:first sg:person.011313423711.63
130 rdf:rest rdf:nil
131 N7c259479480d4f6f86ee0ea88545977c schema:volumeNumber 45
132 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
133 N895710a912544fae8e97bd07641ffd94 schema:name doi
134 schema:value 10.1007/s00603-011-0211-0
135 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
136 N8f9ab8dca38a4813bbb3170d24179126 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
137 rdf:type schema:Organization
138 Nd20935c30c4b4b3ca074a4290f96adb1 schema:name dimensions_id
139 schema:value pub.1049606654
140 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
141 anzsrc-for:09 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
142 schema:name Engineering
143 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
144 anzsrc-for:0912 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
145 schema:name Materials Engineering
146 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
147 anzsrc-for:0914 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
148 schema:name Resources Engineering and Extractive Metallurgy
149 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
150 sg:journal.1052698 schema:issn 0723-2632
151 1434-453X
152 schema:name Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering
153 schema:publisher Springer Nature
154 rdf:type schema:Periodical
155 sg:person.011313423711.63 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.421234.2
156 schema:familyName Yao
157 schema:givenName Yao
158 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.011313423711.63
159 rdf:type schema:Person
160 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01148768 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1040203587
161 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01148768
162 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
163 sg:pub.10.1007/s10704-006-7153-7 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1040638369
164 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10704-006-7153-7
165 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
166 sg:pub.10.1007/s10704-007-9156-4 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1020917882
167 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10704-007-9156-4
168 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
169 sg:pub.10.1023/a:1023968010028 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033373041
170 https://doi.org/10.1023/a:1023968010028
171 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
172 grid-institutes:grid.421234.2 schema:alternateName ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, TX, USA
173 schema:name ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company, Houston, TX, USA
174 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...