Hidden treatments in ecological experiments: re-evaluating the ecosystem function of biodiversity View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1997-05

AUTHORS

Michael A. Huston

ABSTRACT

Interactions between biotic and abiotic processes complicate the design and interpretation of ecological experiments. Separating causality from simple correlation requires distinguishing among experimental treatments, experimental responses, and the many processes and properties that are correlated with either the treatments or the responses, or both. When an experimental manipulation has multiple components, but only one of them is identified as the experimental treatment, erroneous conclusions about cause and effect relationships are likely because the actual cause of any observed response may be ignored in the interpretation of the experimental results. This unrecognized cause of an observed response can be considered a "hidden treatment." Three types of hidden treatments are potential problems in biodiversity experiments: (1) abiotic conditions, such as resource levels, or biotic conditions, such as predation, which are intentionally or unintentionally altered in order to create differences in species numbers for "diversity" treatments; (2) non-random selection of species with particular attributes that produce treatment differences that exceed those due to "diversity" alone; and (3) the increased statistical probability of including a species with a dominant negative or positive effect (e.g., dense shade, or nitrogen fixation) in randomly selected groups of species of increasing number or "diversity." In each of these cases, treatment responses that are actually the result of the "hidden treatment" may be inadvertently attributed to variation in species diversity. Case studies re-evaluating three different types of biodiversity experiments demonstrate that the increases found in such ecosystem properties as productivity, nutrient use efficiency, and stability (all of which were attributed to higher levels of species diversity) were actually caused by "hidden treatments" that altered plant biomass and productivity. More... »

PAGES

449-460

Journal

TITLE

Oecologia

ISSUE

4

VOLUME

110

Author Affiliations

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004420050180

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s004420050180

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007976911

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28307235


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Ecology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Oak Ridge National Laboratory", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.135519.a", 
          "name": [
            "Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335 USA Fax: 423-574-2232; e-mail: mhu@ornl.gov, US"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Huston", 
        "givenName": "Michael A.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0736067057.55", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0736067057.55"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1997-05", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1997-05-01", 
    "description": "Interactions between biotic and abiotic processes complicate the design and interpretation of ecological experiments. Separating causality from simple correlation requires distinguishing among experimental treatments, experimental responses, and the many processes and properties that are correlated with either the treatments or the responses, or both. When an experimental manipulation has multiple components, but only one of them is identified as the experimental treatment, erroneous conclusions about cause and effect relationships are likely because the actual cause of any observed response may be ignored in the interpretation of the experimental results. This unrecognized cause of an observed response can be considered a \"hidden treatment.\" Three types of hidden treatments are potential problems in biodiversity experiments: (1) abiotic conditions, such as resource levels, or biotic conditions, such as predation, which are intentionally or unintentionally altered in order to create differences in species numbers for \"diversity\" treatments; (2) non-random selection of species with particular attributes that produce treatment differences that exceed those due to \"diversity\" alone; and (3) the increased statistical probability of including a species with a dominant negative or positive effect (e.g., dense shade, or nitrogen fixation) in randomly selected groups of species of increasing number or \"diversity.\" In each of these cases, treatment responses that are actually the result of the \"hidden treatment\" may be inadvertently attributed to variation in species diversity. Case studies re-evaluating three different types of biodiversity experiments demonstrate that the increases found in such ecosystem properties as productivity, nutrient use efficiency, and stability (all of which were attributed to higher levels of species diversity) were actually caused by \"hidden treatments\" that altered plant biomass and productivity.", 
    "genre": "research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s004420050180", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1009586", 
        "issn": [
          "0029-8549", 
          "1432-1939"
        ], 
        "name": "Oecologia", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "4", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "110"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "Hidden treatments in ecological experiments: re-evaluating the ecosystem function of biodiversity", 
    "pagination": "449-460", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "2600622e012280e18342f31c0a580b4533b08d5e3271ec590c6e76bfb9463bca"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "pubmed_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "28307235"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nlm_unique_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "0150372"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s004420050180"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1007976911"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420050180", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007976911"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-10T21:40", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000001_0000000264/records_8687_00000530.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "http://link.springer.com/10.1007%2Fs004420050180"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004420050180'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004420050180'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004420050180'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004420050180'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

69 TRIPLES      20 PREDICATES      29 URIs      21 LITERALS      9 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s004420050180 schema:about anzsrc-for:06
2 anzsrc-for:0602
3 schema:author Nec26372eba704ac48f00ea3f512e4150
4 schema:datePublished 1997-05
5 schema:datePublishedReg 1997-05-01
6 schema:description Interactions between biotic and abiotic processes complicate the design and interpretation of ecological experiments. Separating causality from simple correlation requires distinguishing among experimental treatments, experimental responses, and the many processes and properties that are correlated with either the treatments or the responses, or both. When an experimental manipulation has multiple components, but only one of them is identified as the experimental treatment, erroneous conclusions about cause and effect relationships are likely because the actual cause of any observed response may be ignored in the interpretation of the experimental results. This unrecognized cause of an observed response can be considered a "hidden treatment." Three types of hidden treatments are potential problems in biodiversity experiments: (1) abiotic conditions, such as resource levels, or biotic conditions, such as predation, which are intentionally or unintentionally altered in order to create differences in species numbers for "diversity" treatments; (2) non-random selection of species with particular attributes that produce treatment differences that exceed those due to "diversity" alone; and (3) the increased statistical probability of including a species with a dominant negative or positive effect (e.g., dense shade, or nitrogen fixation) in randomly selected groups of species of increasing number or "diversity." In each of these cases, treatment responses that are actually the result of the "hidden treatment" may be inadvertently attributed to variation in species diversity. Case studies re-evaluating three different types of biodiversity experiments demonstrate that the increases found in such ecosystem properties as productivity, nutrient use efficiency, and stability (all of which were attributed to higher levels of species diversity) were actually caused by "hidden treatments" that altered plant biomass and productivity.
7 schema:genre research_article
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
10 schema:isPartOf N0d155e12dc9149e78554ea5525b39dac
11 N0d973ea9cfa44f9db642c3dc82da56fa
12 sg:journal.1009586
13 schema:name Hidden treatments in ecological experiments: re-evaluating the ecosystem function of biodiversity
14 schema:pagination 449-460
15 schema:productId N0c796f4f52bb4ca0b09e8989b8f532d1
16 N34b71507643e4393b4ddddf5f25ef18b
17 Nc136978d169345a89f4ab6e3acdb2c13
18 Nd74948fc8afc404eb578002923c4fda2
19 Nec176267012a4ad7ae19e0397591c720
20 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007976911
21 https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420050180
22 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-10T21:40
23 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
24 schema:sdPublisher Neb14d0051e0247d7a9143396825a8e2f
25 schema:url http://link.springer.com/10.1007%2Fs004420050180
26 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
27 sgo:sdDataset articles
28 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
29 N0c796f4f52bb4ca0b09e8989b8f532d1 schema:name dimensions_id
30 schema:value pub.1007976911
31 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
32 N0d155e12dc9149e78554ea5525b39dac schema:volumeNumber 110
33 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
34 N0d973ea9cfa44f9db642c3dc82da56fa schema:issueNumber 4
35 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
36 N34b71507643e4393b4ddddf5f25ef18b schema:name readcube_id
37 schema:value 2600622e012280e18342f31c0a580b4533b08d5e3271ec590c6e76bfb9463bca
38 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
39 Nc136978d169345a89f4ab6e3acdb2c13 schema:name pubmed_id
40 schema:value 28307235
41 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
42 Nd74948fc8afc404eb578002923c4fda2 schema:name nlm_unique_id
43 schema:value 0150372
44 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
45 Neb14d0051e0247d7a9143396825a8e2f schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
46 rdf:type schema:Organization
47 Nec176267012a4ad7ae19e0397591c720 schema:name doi
48 schema:value 10.1007/s004420050180
49 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
50 Nec26372eba704ac48f00ea3f512e4150 rdf:first sg:person.0736067057.55
51 rdf:rest rdf:nil
52 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
53 schema:name Biological Sciences
54 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
55 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
56 schema:name Ecology
57 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
58 sg:journal.1009586 schema:issn 0029-8549
59 1432-1939
60 schema:name Oecologia
61 rdf:type schema:Periodical
62 sg:person.0736067057.55 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.135519.a
63 schema:familyName Huston
64 schema:givenName Michael A.
65 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0736067057.55
66 rdf:type schema:Person
67 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.135519.a schema:alternateName Oak Ridge National Laboratory
68 schema:name Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6335 USA Fax: 423-574-2232; e-mail: mhu@ornl.gov, US
69 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...