Transpiration in response to variation in microclimate and soil moisture in southeastern deciduous forests View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2001-05-01

AUTHORS

Ram Oren, Diane E. Pataki

ABSTRACT

Responses of forests to changes in environmental conditions reflect the integrated behavior of their constituent species. We investigated sap flux-scaled transpiration responses of two species prevalent in upland eastern hardwood forests, Quercus alba in the upper canopy and Acer rubrum in the low to mid canopy, to changes in photosynthetically active radiation above the canopy (Qo), vapor pressure deficit within the canopy (D), and soil moisture depletion during an entire growing season. Water loss before bud break (presumably through the bark) increased linearly with D, reaching 8% of daily stand transpiration (EC) as measured when leaf area index was at maximum, and accounting for 5% of annual water loss. After leaves were completely expanded and when soil moisture was high, sap flux-scaled daily EC increased linearly with the daily sum of Qo. Species differences in this response were observed. Q. alba reached a maximum transpiration at low Qo, while A. rubrum showed increasing transpiration with Qo at all light levels. Daily EC increased in response to daily average D, with an asymptotic response due to the behavior of Q. alba. Transpiration of A. rubrum showed a greater response to soil moisture depletion than did that of Q. alba. When evaluated at a half-hourly scale under high Qo, mean canopy stomatal conductance (GS) of individuals decreased with D. The sensitivity of GS to D was greater in species with higher intrinsic GS. Regardless of position in the canopy, diffuse-porous species in this and an additional, more mesic stand showed higher GS and greater stomatal sensitivity to environmental variation than do ring-porous species. More... »

PAGES

549-559

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004420000622

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s004420000622

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036951770

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28547493


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Ecology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "School of the Environment, Duke University, 27708-0328, Durham, NC, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26009.3d", 
          "name": [
            "School of the Environment, Duke University, 27708-0328, Durham, NC, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Oren", 
        "givenName": "Ram", 
        "id": "sg:person.01164701223.05", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01164701223.05"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "School of the Environment, Duke University, 27708-0328, Durham, NC, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26009.3d", 
          "name": [
            "School of the Environment, Duke University, 27708-0328, Durham, NC, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Pataki", 
        "givenName": "Diane E.", 
        "id": "sg:person.011551506554.51", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.011551506554.51"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2001-05-01", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2001-05-01", 
    "description": "Responses of forests to changes in environmental conditions reflect the integrated behavior of their constituent species. We investigated sap flux-scaled transpiration responses of two species prevalent in upland eastern hardwood forests, Quercus alba in the upper canopy and Acer rubrum in the low to mid canopy, to changes in photosynthetically active radiation above the canopy (Qo), vapor pressure deficit within the canopy (D), and soil moisture depletion during an entire growing season. Water loss before bud break (presumably through the bark) increased linearly with D, reaching 8% of daily stand transpiration (EC) as measured when leaf area index was at maximum, and accounting for 5% of annual water loss. After leaves were completely expanded and when soil moisture was high, sap flux-scaled daily EC increased linearly with the daily sum of Qo. Species differences in this response were observed. Q. alba reached a maximum transpiration at low Qo, while A. rubrum showed increasing transpiration with Qo at all light levels. Daily EC increased in response to daily average D, with an asymptotic response due to the behavior of Q. alba. Transpiration of A. rubrum showed a greater response to soil moisture depletion than did that of Q. alba. When evaluated at a half-hourly scale under high Qo, mean canopy stomatal conductance (GS) of individuals decreased with D. The sensitivity of GS to D was greater in species with higher intrinsic GS. Regardless of position in the canopy, diffuse-porous species in this and an additional, more mesic stand showed higher GS and greater stomatal sensitivity to environmental variation than do ring-porous species.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s004420000622", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1009586", 
        "issn": [
          "0029-8549", 
          "1432-1939"
        ], 
        "name": "Oecologia", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "4", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "127"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "soil moisture depletion", 
      "moisture depletion", 
      "soil moisture", 
      "eastern hardwood forests", 
      "greater stomatal sensitivity", 
      "leaf area index", 
      "water loss", 
      "annual water loss", 
      "response of forests", 
      "ring-porous species", 
      "diffuse-porous species", 
      "vapor pressure deficit", 
      "hardwood forests", 
      "Acer rubrum", 
      "mid canopy", 
      "sensitivity of gs", 
      "area index", 
      "maximum transpiration", 
      "mesic stands", 
      "deciduous forest", 
      "transpiration response", 
      "upper canopy", 
      "stomatal conductance", 
      "stomatal sensitivity", 
      "active radiation", 
      "pressure deficit", 
      "canopy", 
      "transpiration", 
      "forest", 
      "bud break", 
      "hourly scale", 
      "high GS", 
      "species prevalent", 
      "light levels", 
      "environmental variation", 
      "environmental conditions", 
      "asymptotic response", 
      "alba", 
      "moisture", 
      "species", 
      "greater response", 
      "species differences", 
      "GS", 
      "stands", 
      "daily sums", 
      "rubrum", 
      "season", 
      "microclimate", 
      "Quercus", 
      "leaves", 
      "EC", 
      "constituent species", 
      "loss", 
      "conductance", 
      "response", 
      "integrated behavior", 
      "variation", 
      "depletion", 
      "changes", 
      "index", 
      "deficits", 
      "conditions", 
      "prevalent", 
      "scale", 
      "differences", 
      "levels", 
      "low", 
      "sensitivity", 
      "radiation", 
      "individuals", 
      "sum", 
      "breaks", 
      "behavior", 
      "position", 
      "daily Ec", 
      "low QoS", 
      "high QoS", 
      "QoS", 
      "sap flux-scaled transpiration responses", 
      "flux-scaled transpiration responses", 
      "upland eastern hardwood forests", 
      "sap flux-scaled daily EC", 
      "flux-scaled daily EC", 
      "higher intrinsic GS", 
      "intrinsic GS", 
      "southeastern deciduous forests"
    ], 
    "name": "Transpiration in response to variation in microclimate and soil moisture in southeastern deciduous forests", 
    "pagination": "549-559", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1036951770"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s004420000622"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "pubmed_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "28547493"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420000622", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036951770"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-01-01T18:10", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220101/entities/gbq_results/article/article_326.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420000622"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004420000622'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004420000622'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004420000622'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004420000622'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

155 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      112 URIs      104 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s004420000622 schema:about anzsrc-for:06
2 anzsrc-for:0602
3 schema:author N432d05ef20364043ac8a1f6d328c3b64
4 schema:datePublished 2001-05-01
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2001-05-01
6 schema:description Responses of forests to changes in environmental conditions reflect the integrated behavior of their constituent species. We investigated sap flux-scaled transpiration responses of two species prevalent in upland eastern hardwood forests, Quercus alba in the upper canopy and Acer rubrum in the low to mid canopy, to changes in photosynthetically active radiation above the canopy (Qo), vapor pressure deficit within the canopy (D), and soil moisture depletion during an entire growing season. Water loss before bud break (presumably through the bark) increased linearly with D, reaching 8% of daily stand transpiration (EC) as measured when leaf area index was at maximum, and accounting for 5% of annual water loss. After leaves were completely expanded and when soil moisture was high, sap flux-scaled daily EC increased linearly with the daily sum of Qo. Species differences in this response were observed. Q. alba reached a maximum transpiration at low Qo, while A. rubrum showed increasing transpiration with Qo at all light levels. Daily EC increased in response to daily average D, with an asymptotic response due to the behavior of Q. alba. Transpiration of A. rubrum showed a greater response to soil moisture depletion than did that of Q. alba. When evaluated at a half-hourly scale under high Qo, mean canopy stomatal conductance (GS) of individuals decreased with D. The sensitivity of GS to D was greater in species with higher intrinsic GS. Regardless of position in the canopy, diffuse-porous species in this and an additional, more mesic stand showed higher GS and greater stomatal sensitivity to environmental variation than do ring-porous species.
7 schema:genre article
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
10 schema:isPartOf N05b4a2c6ecf64f92b3cd07b4744b6b8d
11 N729509cc2e35447990eba039d7b30d6b
12 sg:journal.1009586
13 schema:keywords Acer rubrum
14 EC
15 GS
16 QoS
17 Quercus
18 active radiation
19 alba
20 annual water loss
21 area index
22 asymptotic response
23 behavior
24 breaks
25 bud break
26 canopy
27 changes
28 conditions
29 conductance
30 constituent species
31 daily Ec
32 daily sums
33 deciduous forest
34 deficits
35 depletion
36 differences
37 diffuse-porous species
38 eastern hardwood forests
39 environmental conditions
40 environmental variation
41 flux-scaled daily EC
42 flux-scaled transpiration responses
43 forest
44 greater response
45 greater stomatal sensitivity
46 hardwood forests
47 high GS
48 high QoS
49 higher intrinsic GS
50 hourly scale
51 index
52 individuals
53 integrated behavior
54 intrinsic GS
55 leaf area index
56 leaves
57 levels
58 light levels
59 loss
60 low
61 low QoS
62 maximum transpiration
63 mesic stands
64 microclimate
65 mid canopy
66 moisture
67 moisture depletion
68 position
69 pressure deficit
70 prevalent
71 radiation
72 response
73 response of forests
74 ring-porous species
75 rubrum
76 sap flux-scaled daily EC
77 sap flux-scaled transpiration responses
78 scale
79 season
80 sensitivity
81 sensitivity of gs
82 soil moisture
83 soil moisture depletion
84 southeastern deciduous forests
85 species
86 species differences
87 species prevalent
88 stands
89 stomatal conductance
90 stomatal sensitivity
91 sum
92 transpiration
93 transpiration response
94 upland eastern hardwood forests
95 upper canopy
96 vapor pressure deficit
97 variation
98 water loss
99 schema:name Transpiration in response to variation in microclimate and soil moisture in southeastern deciduous forests
100 schema:pagination 549-559
101 schema:productId N4308eab83b6942168d70814f414b0af1
102 N7e57f211163841a69ff421bd31096e90
103 N8fe38c4774b9491d99e52c6a1c937df0
104 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036951770
105 https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420000622
106 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-01-01T18:10
107 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
108 schema:sdPublisher Ndca2ca6f8c0245ddb8a14f0cfe643b25
109 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s004420000622
110 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
111 sgo:sdDataset articles
112 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
113 N05b4a2c6ecf64f92b3cd07b4744b6b8d schema:issueNumber 4
114 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
115 N4308eab83b6942168d70814f414b0af1 schema:name doi
116 schema:value 10.1007/s004420000622
117 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
118 N432d05ef20364043ac8a1f6d328c3b64 rdf:first sg:person.01164701223.05
119 rdf:rest N81229fec10b84876a3f0113d494b8780
120 N729509cc2e35447990eba039d7b30d6b schema:volumeNumber 127
121 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
122 N7e57f211163841a69ff421bd31096e90 schema:name dimensions_id
123 schema:value pub.1036951770
124 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
125 N81229fec10b84876a3f0113d494b8780 rdf:first sg:person.011551506554.51
126 rdf:rest rdf:nil
127 N8fe38c4774b9491d99e52c6a1c937df0 schema:name pubmed_id
128 schema:value 28547493
129 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
130 Ndca2ca6f8c0245ddb8a14f0cfe643b25 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
131 rdf:type schema:Organization
132 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
133 schema:name Biological Sciences
134 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
135 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
136 schema:name Ecology
137 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
138 sg:journal.1009586 schema:issn 0029-8549
139 1432-1939
140 schema:name Oecologia
141 schema:publisher Springer Nature
142 rdf:type schema:Periodical
143 sg:person.011551506554.51 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.26009.3d
144 schema:familyName Pataki
145 schema:givenName Diane E.
146 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.011551506554.51
147 rdf:type schema:Person
148 sg:person.01164701223.05 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.26009.3d
149 schema:familyName Oren
150 schema:givenName Ram
151 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01164701223.05
152 rdf:type schema:Person
153 grid-institutes:grid.26009.3d schema:alternateName School of the Environment, Duke University, 27708-0328, Durham, NC, USA
154 schema:name School of the Environment, Duke University, 27708-0328, Durham, NC, USA
155 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...