Zircon megacrysts from kimberlite: oxygen isotope variability among mantle melts View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1998-10

AUTHORS

John W. Valley, Peter D. Kinny, Daniel J. Schulze, Michael J. Spicuzza

ABSTRACT

The oxygen isotope ratios of Phanerozoic zircons from kimberlite pipes in the Kaapvaal Craton of southern Africa and the Siberian Platform vary from 4.7 to 5.9‰ VSMOW. High precision, accurate analyses by laser reveal subtle pipe-to-pipe differences not previously suspected. These zircons have distinctive chemical and physical characteristics identifying them as mantle-derived megacrysts similar to zircons found associated with diamond, coesite, MARID xenoliths, Cr-diopside, K-richterite, or Mg-rich ilmenite. Several lines of evidence indicate that these 18O values are unaltered by kimberlite magmas during eruption and represent compositions preserved since crystallization in the mantle, including: U/Pb age, large crystal size, and the slow rate of oxygen exchange in non-metamict zircon. The average 18O of mantle zircons is 5.3‰, ∼0.1 higher and in equilibrium with values for olivine in peridotite xenoliths and oceanic basalts. Zircon megacrysts from within 250 km of Kimberley, South Africa have average 18O=5.32±0.17 (n=28). Small, but significant, differences among other kimberlite pipes or groups of pipes may indicate isotopically distinct reservoirs in the sub-continental lithosphere or asthenosphere, some of which are anomalous with respect to normal mantle values of 5.3±0.3. Precambrian zircons (2.1–2.7 Ga) from Jwaneng, Botswana have the lowest values yet measured in a mantle zircon, 18O=3.4 to 4.7‰. These zircon megacrysts originally crystallized in mafic or ultramafic rocks either through melting and metasomatism associated with kimberlite magmatism or during metamorphism. The low 18O zircons are best explained by subduction of late Archean ocean crust that exchanged with heated seawater prior to underplating as eclogite and to associated metasomatism of the mantle wedge. Smaller differences among other pipes and districts may result from variable temperatures of equilibration, mafic versus ultramafic hosts, or variable underplating. The narrow range in zircon compositions found in most pipes suggests magmatic homogenization. If this is correct, these zircons document the existence of significant quantities of magma in the sub-continental mantle that was regionally variable in 18O and this information restricts theories about the nature of ancient subduction. More... »

PAGES

1-11

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004100050432

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s004100050432

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001095580


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0403", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Geology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/04", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Earth Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of Wisconsin\u2013Madison", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.14003.36", 
          "name": [
            "Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin, 1215 W. Dayton St., Madison, WI 53706, USA; Fax: 608/262-0693; E-mail: VALLEY@GEOLOGY.WISC.EDU, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Valley", 
        "givenName": "John W.", 
        "id": "sg:person.013070671177.63", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013070671177.63"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Curtin University", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.1032.0", 
          "name": [
            "Tectonics Special Research Center, School of Applied Geology, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6001, Australia, Australia"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Kinny", 
        "givenName": "Peter D.", 
        "id": "sg:person.014563034101.22", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.014563034101.22"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of Toronto", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.17063.33", 
          "name": [
            "Dept. of Geology, University of Toronto, Erindale College, Mississauga, ON LL 1C6, Canada, Canada"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Schulze", 
        "givenName": "Daniel J.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01164552576.93", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01164552576.93"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of Wisconsin\u2013Madison", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.14003.36", 
          "name": [
            "Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin, 1215 W. Dayton St., Madison, WI 53706, USA; Fax: 608/262-0693; E-mail: VALLEY@GEOLOGY.WISC.EDU, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Spicuzza", 
        "givenName": "Michael J.", 
        "id": "sg:person.015134053161.98", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.015134053161.98"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1998-10", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1998-10-01", 
    "description": "The oxygen isotope ratios of Phanerozoic zircons from kimberlite pipes in the Kaapvaal Craton of southern Africa and the Siberian Platform vary from 4.7 to 5.9\u2030 VSMOW. High precision, accurate analyses by laser reveal subtle pipe-to-pipe differences not previously suspected. These zircons have distinctive chemical and physical characteristics identifying them as mantle-derived megacrysts similar to zircons found associated with diamond, coesite, MARID xenoliths, Cr-diopside, K-richterite, or Mg-rich ilmenite. Several lines of evidence indicate that these 18O values are unaltered by kimberlite magmas during eruption and represent compositions preserved since crystallization in the mantle, including: U/Pb age, large crystal size, and the slow rate of oxygen exchange in non-metamict zircon. The average 18O of mantle zircons is 5.3\u2030, \u223c0.1 higher and in equilibrium with values for olivine in peridotite xenoliths and oceanic basalts. Zircon megacrysts from within 250 km of Kimberley, South Africa have average 18O=5.32\u00b10.17 (n=28). Small, but significant, differences among other kimberlite pipes or groups of pipes may indicate isotopically distinct reservoirs in the sub-continental lithosphere or asthenosphere, some of which are anomalous with respect to normal mantle values of 5.3\u00b10.3. Precambrian zircons (2.1\u20132.7 Ga) from Jwaneng, Botswana have the lowest values yet measured in a mantle zircon, 18O=3.4 to 4.7\u2030. These zircon megacrysts originally crystallized in mafic or ultramafic rocks either through melting and metasomatism associated with kimberlite magmatism or during metamorphism. The low 18O zircons are best explained by subduction of late Archean ocean crust that exchanged with heated seawater prior to underplating as eclogite and to associated metasomatism of the mantle wedge. Smaller differences among other pipes and districts may result from variable temperatures of equilibration, mafic versus ultramafic hosts, or variable underplating. The narrow range in zircon compositions found in most pipes suggests magmatic homogenization. If this is correct, these zircons document the existence of significant quantities of magma in the sub-continental mantle that was regionally variable in 18O and this information restricts theories about the nature of ancient subduction.", 
    "genre": "research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s004100050432", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1026106", 
        "issn": [
          "0010-7999", 
          "1432-0967"
        ], 
        "name": "Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "1-2", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "133"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "Zircon megacrysts from kimberlite: oxygen isotope variability among mantle melts", 
    "pagination": "1-11", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "053838cf3cfa9b82f97214ced3fd6a685ce6789a7386812bf182963e627f7589"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s004100050432"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1001095580"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s004100050432", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001095580"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-11T01:01", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000001_0000000264/records_8697_00000485.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s004100050432"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004100050432'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004100050432'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004100050432'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004100050432'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

88 TRIPLES      20 PREDICATES      27 URIs      19 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s004100050432 schema:about anzsrc-for:04
2 anzsrc-for:0403
3 schema:author Nfafb540c99214117aab801d86db3a3c2
4 schema:datePublished 1998-10
5 schema:datePublishedReg 1998-10-01
6 schema:description The oxygen isotope ratios of Phanerozoic zircons from kimberlite pipes in the Kaapvaal Craton of southern Africa and the Siberian Platform vary from 4.7 to 5.9‰ VSMOW. High precision, accurate analyses by laser reveal subtle pipe-to-pipe differences not previously suspected. These zircons have distinctive chemical and physical characteristics identifying them as mantle-derived megacrysts similar to zircons found associated with diamond, coesite, MARID xenoliths, Cr-diopside, K-richterite, or Mg-rich ilmenite. Several lines of evidence indicate that these 18O values are unaltered by kimberlite magmas during eruption and represent compositions preserved since crystallization in the mantle, including: U/Pb age, large crystal size, and the slow rate of oxygen exchange in non-metamict zircon. The average 18O of mantle zircons is 5.3‰, ∼0.1 higher and in equilibrium with values for olivine in peridotite xenoliths and oceanic basalts. Zircon megacrysts from within 250 km of Kimberley, South Africa have average 18O=5.32±0.17 (n=28). Small, but significant, differences among other kimberlite pipes or groups of pipes may indicate isotopically distinct reservoirs in the sub-continental lithosphere or asthenosphere, some of which are anomalous with respect to normal mantle values of 5.3±0.3. Precambrian zircons (2.1–2.7 Ga) from Jwaneng, Botswana have the lowest values yet measured in a mantle zircon, 18O=3.4 to 4.7‰. These zircon megacrysts originally crystallized in mafic or ultramafic rocks either through melting and metasomatism associated with kimberlite magmatism or during metamorphism. The low 18O zircons are best explained by subduction of late Archean ocean crust that exchanged with heated seawater prior to underplating as eclogite and to associated metasomatism of the mantle wedge. Smaller differences among other pipes and districts may result from variable temperatures of equilibration, mafic versus ultramafic hosts, or variable underplating. The narrow range in zircon compositions found in most pipes suggests magmatic homogenization. If this is correct, these zircons document the existence of significant quantities of magma in the sub-continental mantle that was regionally variable in 18O and this information restricts theories about the nature of ancient subduction.
7 schema:genre research_article
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
10 schema:isPartOf Nd224b5c5803b4e5f9eb602c6c55cbb70
11 Nfa7efce1bff04a3c94ddf2b60e7d174e
12 sg:journal.1026106
13 schema:name Zircon megacrysts from kimberlite: oxygen isotope variability among mantle melts
14 schema:pagination 1-11
15 schema:productId N445dfbfbc05a4a19978c639570b6b4bc
16 Naeec155424aa4b5e8b76d0441a65256e
17 Nf3e6612de48d4bbe835f0ed07a567a84
18 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001095580
19 https://doi.org/10.1007/s004100050432
20 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-11T01:01
21 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
22 schema:sdPublisher N561bd9484ab04504ae839ed5a3522310
23 schema:url http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s004100050432
24 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
25 sgo:sdDataset articles
26 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
27 N445dfbfbc05a4a19978c639570b6b4bc schema:name doi
28 schema:value 10.1007/s004100050432
29 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
30 N539e2612dfd94da69af784b6e86f5c2a rdf:first sg:person.015134053161.98
31 rdf:rest rdf:nil
32 N561bd9484ab04504ae839ed5a3522310 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
33 rdf:type schema:Organization
34 N70401dd7e40944e6bdcc023da494d27a rdf:first sg:person.01164552576.93
35 rdf:rest N539e2612dfd94da69af784b6e86f5c2a
36 N89c00e95c55c4da68b550153421a97b1 rdf:first sg:person.014563034101.22
37 rdf:rest N70401dd7e40944e6bdcc023da494d27a
38 Naeec155424aa4b5e8b76d0441a65256e schema:name readcube_id
39 schema:value 053838cf3cfa9b82f97214ced3fd6a685ce6789a7386812bf182963e627f7589
40 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
41 Nd224b5c5803b4e5f9eb602c6c55cbb70 schema:volumeNumber 133
42 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
43 Nf3e6612de48d4bbe835f0ed07a567a84 schema:name dimensions_id
44 schema:value pub.1001095580
45 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
46 Nfa7efce1bff04a3c94ddf2b60e7d174e schema:issueNumber 1-2
47 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
48 Nfafb540c99214117aab801d86db3a3c2 rdf:first sg:person.013070671177.63
49 rdf:rest N89c00e95c55c4da68b550153421a97b1
50 anzsrc-for:04 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
51 schema:name Earth Sciences
52 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
53 anzsrc-for:0403 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
54 schema:name Geology
55 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
56 sg:journal.1026106 schema:issn 0010-7999
57 1432-0967
58 schema:name Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology
59 rdf:type schema:Periodical
60 sg:person.01164552576.93 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.17063.33
61 schema:familyName Schulze
62 schema:givenName Daniel J.
63 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01164552576.93
64 rdf:type schema:Person
65 sg:person.013070671177.63 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.14003.36
66 schema:familyName Valley
67 schema:givenName John W.
68 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013070671177.63
69 rdf:type schema:Person
70 sg:person.014563034101.22 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.1032.0
71 schema:familyName Kinny
72 schema:givenName Peter D.
73 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.014563034101.22
74 rdf:type schema:Person
75 sg:person.015134053161.98 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.14003.36
76 schema:familyName Spicuzza
77 schema:givenName Michael J.
78 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.015134053161.98
79 rdf:type schema:Person
80 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.1032.0 schema:alternateName Curtin University
81 schema:name Tectonics Special Research Center, School of Applied Geology, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth 6001, Australia, Australia
82 rdf:type schema:Organization
83 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.14003.36 schema:alternateName University of Wisconsin–Madison
84 schema:name Dept. of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin, 1215 W. Dayton St., Madison, WI 53706, USA; Fax: 608/262-0693; E-mail: VALLEY@GEOLOGY.WISC.EDU, USA
85 rdf:type schema:Organization
86 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.17063.33 schema:alternateName University of Toronto
87 schema:name Dept. of Geology, University of Toronto, Erindale College, Mississauga, ON LL 1C6, Canada, Canada
88 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...