Formation and destruction of periclase by fluid flow in two contact aureoles View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1997-08

AUTHORS

John M. Ferry, Douglas Rumble III.

ABSTRACT

Periclase formed in steeply dipping marbles from the Beinn an Dubhaich aureole, Scotland, and the Silver Star aureole, Montana, by the reaction dolomite = periclase + calcite + CO2. Equilibrium between rock and fluids with XCO2 < 1 requires that reaction was infiltration-driven. Brucite pseudomorphs after periclase occur in the Beinn an Dubhaich aureole either as bed-by-bed replacement of dolomite or in a lens along the contact between dolomite and a pre-metamorphic dike. Transport theory predicts that infiltration drove both periclase reaction and 18O-depletion fronts which moved at significantly different velocities along the flow path. The distributions of brucite and 18O-depleted rocks are identical in surface exposures, thus indicating upward flow. Time-integrated flux (q) was <500 mol/cm2 and the fluid source was magmatic. Because periclase and its hydrated equivalent brucite are unaltered to dolomite by retrograde reactions, the exposure of brucite marbles accurately images the flow paths of peak metamorphic fluids. In the Silver Star aureole brucite pseudomorphs after periclase exclusively occur in tabular bodies that are beds with elevated Mg/Ca. The spatial pattern of 18O-depletion requires upward vertical fluid flow. Estimated prograde q ≈ 103–104 mol/cm2 and the fluid source was magmatic. Low Mg/Ca, 18O-depleted, brucite-free rocks pose a dilemma because the periclase reaction front should have traveled ≈18 times further through them than the isotope alteration front. The dilemma is resolved by reaction textures that indicate periclase and brucite were destroyed in low Mg/Ca rocks by infiltration-driven retrograde carbonation reactions. Values of retrograde q were ≈103–104 mol/cm2. Brucite (after periclase) was preserved only in high Mg/Ca layers where periclase developed in greater abundance. The geometry of brucite marbles at Silver Star thus reflects the location of high Mg/Ca beds rather than the geometry of fluid flow. Retrograde reactions must be considered before the mineralogical record of prograde fluid flow can correctly be interpreted. In both aureoles fluid flow, mineral reaction, and isotope depletion were structurally controlled by bedding and lithologic contacts. More... »

PAGES

313-334

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s004100050312

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s004100050312

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1024478923


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