Website transparency of dermatology residency programs: a cross-sectional study View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2022-08-17

AUTHORS

W. Austin Wyant, Scott A. Elman, Vinod E. Nambudiri

ABSTRACT

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the dermatology residency application process rapidly transitioned in a number of dimensions. As in-person activities were canceled and USMLE Step 1 has become pass/fail, there have been several proposed changes to enhance the process, including a push for increased transparency. Given than most dermatology applicants use program websites to learn more about potential residency programs, we conducted a cross-sectional study to quantify how transparent dermatology residency program website were, relative to published guidelines. From February 11, 2022, to February 25, 2022, we examined the available websites of all ACGME-accredited dermatology residencies to determine transparency regarding information dissemination, selection criteria, interview process, program priorities, and program requirements and opportunities. 136 out of 143 dermatology programs (95.1%) were included. Overall, programs were most transparent with program requirements and opportunities (87.25%). This included information on hospital locations, subspecialty clinics, and rotation/call/didactic schedules. Programs were least transparent with sharing their selection and/or exclusion criteria (31.13%) and varied in how much information they shared about the interview process (39.34%), as well as program priorities (64.56%). Opportunities remain for dermatology programs to improve website transparency and aid applicants in this difficult-to-navigate process. These results identify real transparency gaps, with several potential foci for improvement. Our main study limitation is its focus on a single time-period; to ensure that this information remains up to date, ongoing efforts to periodically resurvey content changes is warranted. Our findings provide an overview of programs’ successes and remaining opportunities to follow published transparency guidelines; overall, these findings may guide individual program directors aiming to improve the transparency of their dermatology residency programs and ultimately benefit our future workforce. More... »

PAGES

1-3

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1150278852

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35976407


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/11", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Medical and Health Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1117", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Public Health and Health Services", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Room 2023, 33136, Miami, FL, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26790.3a", 
          "name": [
            "Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Room 2023, 33136, Miami, FL, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Wyant", 
        "givenName": "W. Austin", 
        "id": "sg:person.012773122575.40", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.012773122575.40"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Room 2023, 33136, Miami, FL, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26790.3a", 
          "name": [
            "Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Room 2023, 33136, Miami, FL, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Elman", 
        "givenName": "Scott A.", 
        "id": "sg:person.014702555630.36", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.014702555630.36"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.38142.3c", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women\u2019s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA", 
            "Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Nambudiri", 
        "givenName": "Vinod E.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01331233127.19", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01331233127.19"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2022-08-17", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2022-08-17", 
    "description": "With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the dermatology residency application process rapidly transitioned in a number of dimensions. As in-person activities were canceled and USMLE Step 1 has become pass/fail, there have been several proposed changes to enhance the process, including a push for increased transparency. Given than most dermatology applicants use program websites to learn more about potential residency programs, we conducted a cross-sectional study to quantify how transparent dermatology residency program website were, relative to published guidelines. From February 11, 2022, to February 25, 2022, we examined the available websites of all ACGME-accredited dermatology residencies to determine transparency regarding information dissemination, selection criteria, interview process, program priorities, and program requirements and opportunities. 136 out of 143 dermatology programs (95.1%) were included. Overall, programs were most transparent with program requirements and opportunities (87.25%). This included information on hospital locations, subspecialty clinics, and rotation/call/didactic schedules. Programs were least transparent with sharing their selection and/or exclusion criteria (31.13%) and varied in how much information they shared about the interview process (39.34%), as well as program priorities (64.56%). Opportunities remain for dermatology programs to improve website transparency and aid applicants in this difficult-to-navigate process. These results identify real transparency gaps, with several potential foci for improvement. Our main study limitation is its focus on a single time-period; to ensure that this information remains up to date, ongoing efforts to periodically resurvey content changes is warranted. Our findings provide an overview of programs\u2019 successes and remaining opportunities to follow published transparency guidelines; overall, these findings may guide individual program directors aiming to improve the transparency of their dermatology residency programs and ultimately benefit our future workforce.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": true, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1054393", 
        "issn": [
          "0340-3696", 
          "1432-069X"
        ], 
        "name": "Archives of Dermatological Research", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "cross-sectional study", 
      "dermatology residency programs", 
      "residency programs", 
      "main study limitation", 
      "dermatology programs", 
      "subspecialty clinics", 
      "exclusion criteria", 
      "hospital location", 
      "program priorities", 
      "program websites", 
      "COVID-19 pandemic", 
      "residency program websites", 
      "dermatology residency", 
      "study limitations", 
      "potential focus", 
      "program directors", 
      "program requirements", 
      "selection criteria", 
      "guidelines", 
      "interview process", 
      "clinic", 
      "findings", 
      "available websites", 
      "individual program directors", 
      "criteria", 
      "onset", 
      "study", 
      "program", 
      "ACGME", 
      "overview of programs", 
      "Step 1", 
      "ongoing efforts", 
      "residency application process", 
      "pandemic", 
      "residency", 
      "pass/", 
      "changes", 
      "dissemination", 
      "schedule", 
      "activity", 
      "future workforce", 
      "person activities", 
      "priority", 
      "date", 
      "USMLE Step 1", 
      "improvement", 
      "focus", 
      "information", 
      "websites", 
      "opportunities", 
      "workforce", 
      "number", 
      "success", 
      "results", 
      "overview", 
      "limitations", 
      "efforts", 
      "applicants", 
      "location", 
      "dermatology applicants", 
      "selection", 
      "process", 
      "directors", 
      "requirements", 
      "content changes", 
      "application process", 
      "information dissemination", 
      "gap", 
      "transparency guidelines", 
      "push", 
      "dimensions", 
      "transparency", 
      "number of dimensions", 
      "transparency gap"
    ], 
    "name": "Website transparency of dermatology residency programs: a cross-sectional study", 
    "pagination": "1-3", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1150278852"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "pubmed_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "35976407"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1150278852"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-11-24T21:08", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221124/entities/gbq_results/article/article_929.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

147 TRIPLES      20 PREDICATES      97 URIs      89 LITERALS      5 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6 schema:about anzsrc-for:11
2 anzsrc-for:1117
3 schema:author N169b4bf28e3545a09be5ad4979b88ea5
4 schema:datePublished 2022-08-17
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2022-08-17
6 schema:description With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the dermatology residency application process rapidly transitioned in a number of dimensions. As in-person activities were canceled and USMLE Step 1 has become pass/fail, there have been several proposed changes to enhance the process, including a push for increased transparency. Given than most dermatology applicants use program websites to learn more about potential residency programs, we conducted a cross-sectional study to quantify how transparent dermatology residency program website were, relative to published guidelines. From February 11, 2022, to February 25, 2022, we examined the available websites of all ACGME-accredited dermatology residencies to determine transparency regarding information dissemination, selection criteria, interview process, program priorities, and program requirements and opportunities. 136 out of 143 dermatology programs (95.1%) were included. Overall, programs were most transparent with program requirements and opportunities (87.25%). This included information on hospital locations, subspecialty clinics, and rotation/call/didactic schedules. Programs were least transparent with sharing their selection and/or exclusion criteria (31.13%) and varied in how much information they shared about the interview process (39.34%), as well as program priorities (64.56%). Opportunities remain for dermatology programs to improve website transparency and aid applicants in this difficult-to-navigate process. These results identify real transparency gaps, with several potential foci for improvement. Our main study limitation is its focus on a single time-period; to ensure that this information remains up to date, ongoing efforts to periodically resurvey content changes is warranted. Our findings provide an overview of programs’ successes and remaining opportunities to follow published transparency guidelines; overall, these findings may guide individual program directors aiming to improve the transparency of their dermatology residency programs and ultimately benefit our future workforce.
7 schema:genre article
8 schema:isAccessibleForFree true
9 schema:isPartOf sg:journal.1054393
10 schema:keywords ACGME
11 COVID-19 pandemic
12 Step 1
13 USMLE Step 1
14 activity
15 applicants
16 application process
17 available websites
18 changes
19 clinic
20 content changes
21 criteria
22 cross-sectional study
23 date
24 dermatology applicants
25 dermatology programs
26 dermatology residency
27 dermatology residency programs
28 dimensions
29 directors
30 dissemination
31 efforts
32 exclusion criteria
33 findings
34 focus
35 future workforce
36 gap
37 guidelines
38 hospital location
39 improvement
40 individual program directors
41 information
42 information dissemination
43 interview process
44 limitations
45 location
46 main study limitation
47 number
48 number of dimensions
49 ongoing efforts
50 onset
51 opportunities
52 overview
53 overview of programs
54 pandemic
55 pass/
56 person activities
57 potential focus
58 priority
59 process
60 program
61 program directors
62 program priorities
63 program requirements
64 program websites
65 push
66 requirements
67 residency
68 residency application process
69 residency program websites
70 residency programs
71 results
72 schedule
73 selection
74 selection criteria
75 study
76 study limitations
77 subspecialty clinics
78 success
79 transparency
80 transparency gap
81 transparency guidelines
82 websites
83 workforce
84 schema:name Website transparency of dermatology residency programs: a cross-sectional study
85 schema:pagination 1-3
86 schema:productId N6ad8f4aa5dac4c70bf91b1392b1484a7
87 N76a119120b014155bf5822e87e071e62
88 Nd8029b6de5d34793ba0dfde492574685
89 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1150278852
90 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6
91 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-11-24T21:08
92 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
93 schema:sdPublisher N3e67802e7ebf42e28056909b9a4b6906
94 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6
95 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
96 sgo:sdDataset articles
97 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
98 N14b7a54fbc0649d5aeac9607e3269d2d rdf:first sg:person.014702555630.36
99 rdf:rest N8fe0f822bce84d9db0836d0e581d335b
100 N169b4bf28e3545a09be5ad4979b88ea5 rdf:first sg:person.012773122575.40
101 rdf:rest N14b7a54fbc0649d5aeac9607e3269d2d
102 N3e67802e7ebf42e28056909b9a4b6906 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
103 rdf:type schema:Organization
104 N6ad8f4aa5dac4c70bf91b1392b1484a7 schema:name doi
105 schema:value 10.1007/s00403-022-02384-6
106 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
107 N76a119120b014155bf5822e87e071e62 schema:name dimensions_id
108 schema:value pub.1150278852
109 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
110 N8fe0f822bce84d9db0836d0e581d335b rdf:first sg:person.01331233127.19
111 rdf:rest rdf:nil
112 Nd8029b6de5d34793ba0dfde492574685 schema:name pubmed_id
113 schema:value 35976407
114 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
115 anzsrc-for:11 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
116 schema:name Medical and Health Sciences
117 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
118 anzsrc-for:1117 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
119 schema:name Public Health and Health Services
120 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
121 sg:journal.1054393 schema:issn 0340-3696
122 1432-069X
123 schema:name Archives of Dermatological Research
124 schema:publisher Springer Nature
125 rdf:type schema:Periodical
126 sg:person.012773122575.40 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.26790.3a
127 schema:familyName Wyant
128 schema:givenName W. Austin
129 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.012773122575.40
130 rdf:type schema:Person
131 sg:person.01331233127.19 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.38142.3c
132 schema:familyName Nambudiri
133 schema:givenName Vinod E.
134 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01331233127.19
135 rdf:type schema:Person
136 sg:person.014702555630.36 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.26790.3a
137 schema:familyName Elman
138 schema:givenName Scott A.
139 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.014702555630.36
140 rdf:type schema:Person
141 grid-institutes:grid.26790.3a schema:alternateName Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Room 2023, 33136, Miami, FL, USA
142 schema:name Dr. Phillip Frost Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1600 NW 10th Ave, Room 2023, 33136, Miami, FL, USA
143 rdf:type schema:Organization
144 grid-institutes:grid.38142.3c schema:alternateName Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
145 schema:name Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
146 Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
147 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...