The role of the individual air-sea flux components in CO2-induced changes of the ocean's circulation and climate View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2000-08

AUTHORS

U. Mikolajewicz, R. Voss

ABSTRACT

In this study we investigate the role of heat, freshwater and momentum fluxes in changing the oceanic climate and thermohaline circulation as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. Two baseline integrations with a fully coupled ocean atmosphere general circulation model with either fixed or increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations have been performed. In a set of sensitivity experiments either freshwater (precipitation, evaporation and runoff from the continents) and/or momentum fluxes were no longer simulated, but prescribed according to one of the fully coupled baseline experiments. This approach gives a direct estimate of the contribution from the individual flux components. The direct effect of surface warming and the associated feedbacks in ocean circulation are the dominant processes in weakening the Atlantic thermohaline circulation in our model. The relative contribution of momentum and freshwater fluxes to the total response turned out to be less than 25%, each. Changes in atmospheric water vapour transport lead to enhanced freshwater input into middle and high latitudes, which weakens the overturning. A stronger export of freshwater from the Atlantic drainage basin to the Indian and Pacific ocean, on the other hand, intensifies the Atlantic overturning circulation. In total the modified freshwater fluxes slightly weaken the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. The contribution of the modified momentum fluxes has a similar magnitude, but enhances the formation of North Atlantic deep water. Salinity anomalies in the Atlantic as a consequence of greenhouse warming stem in almost equal parts from changes in net freshwater fluxes and from changes in ocean circulation caused by the surface warming due to atmospheric heat fluxes. Important effects of the momentum fluxes are a poleward shift of the front between Northern Hemisphere subtropical and subpolar gyres and a southward shift in the position of the Antarctic circumpolar current, with a clear signal in sea level. More... »

PAGES

627-642

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s003820000066

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s003820000066

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027780110


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/04", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Earth Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0405", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Oceanography", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Max-Planck-Institut f\u00fcr Meteorologie, Bundesstr. 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany E-mail: mikolajewicz@dkrz.de, DE", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.450268.d", 
          "name": [
            "Max-Planck-Institut f\u00fcr Meteorologie, Bundesstr. 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany E-mail: mikolajewicz@dkrz.de, DE"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Mikolajewicz", 
        "givenName": "U.", 
        "id": "sg:person.07735453701.56", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.07735453701.56"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Max-Planck-Institut f\u00fcr Meteorologie, Bundesstr. 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany E-mail: mikolajewicz@dkrz.de, DE", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.450268.d", 
          "name": [
            "Max-Planck-Institut f\u00fcr Meteorologie, Bundesstr. 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany E-mail: mikolajewicz@dkrz.de, DE"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Voss", 
        "givenName": "R.", 
        "id": "sg:person.014244276466.52", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.014244276466.52"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2000-08", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2000-08-01", 
    "description": "Abstract\u2002In this study we investigate the role of heat, freshwater and momentum fluxes in changing the oceanic climate and thermohaline circulation as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. Two baseline integrations with a fully coupled ocean atmosphere general circulation model with either fixed or increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations have been performed. In a set of sensitivity experiments either freshwater (precipitation, evaporation and runoff from the continents) and/or momentum fluxes were no longer simulated, but prescribed according to one of the fully coupled baseline experiments. This approach gives a direct estimate of the contribution from the individual flux components. The direct effect of surface warming and the associated feedbacks in ocean circulation are the dominant processes in weakening the Atlantic thermohaline circulation in our model. The relative contribution of momentum and freshwater fluxes to the total response turned out to be less than 25%, each. Changes in atmospheric water vapour transport lead to enhanced freshwater input into middle and high latitudes, which weakens the overturning. A stronger export of freshwater from the Atlantic drainage basin to the Indian and Pacific ocean, on the other hand, intensifies the Atlantic overturning circulation. In total the modified freshwater fluxes slightly weaken the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. The contribution of the modified momentum fluxes has a similar magnitude, but enhances the formation of North Atlantic deep water. Salinity anomalies in the Atlantic as a consequence of greenhouse warming stem in almost equal parts from changes in net freshwater fluxes and from changes in ocean circulation caused by the surface warming due to atmospheric heat fluxes. Important effects of the momentum fluxes are a poleward shift of the front between Northern Hemisphere subtropical and subpolar gyres and a southward shift in the position of the Antarctic circumpolar current, with a clear signal in sea level.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s003820000066", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1049631", 
        "issn": [
          "0930-7575", 
          "1432-0894"
        ], 
        "name": "Climate Dynamics", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "8", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "16"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "freshwater flux", 
      "Atlantic thermohaline circulation", 
      "atmospheric CO2 concentration", 
      "thermohaline circulation", 
      "ocean circulation", 
      "momentum flux", 
      "freshwater", 
      "ocean-atmosphere general circulation model", 
      "enhanced freshwater input", 
      "North Atlantic Deep Water", 
      "net freshwater flux", 
      "atmosphere general circulation model", 
      "CO2 concentration", 
      "Atlantic Deep Water", 
      "atmospheric heat fluxes", 
      "Antarctic Circumpolar Current", 
      "general circulation model", 
      "freshwater input", 
      "Atlantic drainage basin", 
      "flux components", 
      "individual flux components", 
      "salinity anomalies", 
      "subpolar gyre", 
      "surface warming", 
      "southward shift", 
      "Circumpolar Current", 
      "circulation model", 
      "sensitivity experiments", 
      "poleward shift", 
      "drainage basin", 
      "Pacific Ocean", 
      "sea level", 
      "Northern Hemisphere", 
      "deep water", 
      "oceanic climate", 
      "high latitudes", 
      "baseline integration", 
      "strong export", 
      "dominant process", 
      "role of heat", 
      "heat flux", 
      "circulation", 
      "flux", 
      "clear signal", 
      "Atlantic", 
      "transport lead", 
      "climate", 
      "similar magnitude", 
      "direct estimates", 
      "relative contribution", 
      "gyre", 
      "Ocean", 
      "basin", 
      "overturning", 
      "warming", 
      "baseline experiments", 
      "latitudes", 
      "anomalies", 
      "hemisphere", 
      "changes", 
      "front", 
      "water", 
      "important effect", 
      "CO2", 
      "contribution", 
      "export", 
      "estimates", 
      "concentration", 
      "magnitude", 
      "shift", 
      "input", 
      "current", 
      "model", 
      "formation", 
      "part", 
      "surface", 
      "total response", 
      "heat", 
      "components", 
      "feedback", 
      "consequences", 
      "lead", 
      "equal parts", 
      "process", 
      "experiments", 
      "direct effect", 
      "momentum", 
      "set", 
      "signals", 
      "role", 
      "position", 
      "effect", 
      "response", 
      "study", 
      "levels", 
      "integration", 
      "hand", 
      "approach", 
      "total", 
      "stem"
    ], 
    "name": "The role of the individual air-sea flux components in CO2-induced changes of the ocean's circulation and climate", 
    "pagination": "627-642", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1027780110"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s003820000066"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s003820000066", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027780110"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-10-01T06:31", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221001/entities/gbq_results/article/article_344.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s003820000066"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s003820000066'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s003820000066'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s003820000066'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s003820000066'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

164 TRIPLES      20 PREDICATES      125 URIs      117 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s003820000066 schema:about anzsrc-for:04
2 anzsrc-for:0405
3 schema:author N1c136b01bda641248ebae9a096d5ca32
4 schema:datePublished 2000-08
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2000-08-01
6 schema:description Abstract In this study we investigate the role of heat, freshwater and momentum fluxes in changing the oceanic climate and thermohaline circulation as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. Two baseline integrations with a fully coupled ocean atmosphere general circulation model with either fixed or increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations have been performed. In a set of sensitivity experiments either freshwater (precipitation, evaporation and runoff from the continents) and/or momentum fluxes were no longer simulated, but prescribed according to one of the fully coupled baseline experiments. This approach gives a direct estimate of the contribution from the individual flux components. The direct effect of surface warming and the associated feedbacks in ocean circulation are the dominant processes in weakening the Atlantic thermohaline circulation in our model. The relative contribution of momentum and freshwater fluxes to the total response turned out to be less than 25%, each. Changes in atmospheric water vapour transport lead to enhanced freshwater input into middle and high latitudes, which weakens the overturning. A stronger export of freshwater from the Atlantic drainage basin to the Indian and Pacific ocean, on the other hand, intensifies the Atlantic overturning circulation. In total the modified freshwater fluxes slightly weaken the Atlantic thermohaline circulation. The contribution of the modified momentum fluxes has a similar magnitude, but enhances the formation of North Atlantic deep water. Salinity anomalies in the Atlantic as a consequence of greenhouse warming stem in almost equal parts from changes in net freshwater fluxes and from changes in ocean circulation caused by the surface warming due to atmospheric heat fluxes. Important effects of the momentum fluxes are a poleward shift of the front between Northern Hemisphere subtropical and subpolar gyres and a southward shift in the position of the Antarctic circumpolar current, with a clear signal in sea level.
7 schema:genre article
8 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
9 schema:isPartOf N1a2a18e836b14c2dbb6b6a527734a100
10 Nc870107539274cc4a518e6b0a4bf60f9
11 sg:journal.1049631
12 schema:keywords Antarctic Circumpolar Current
13 Atlantic
14 Atlantic Deep Water
15 Atlantic drainage basin
16 Atlantic thermohaline circulation
17 CO2
18 CO2 concentration
19 Circumpolar Current
20 North Atlantic Deep Water
21 Northern Hemisphere
22 Ocean
23 Pacific Ocean
24 anomalies
25 approach
26 atmosphere general circulation model
27 atmospheric CO2 concentration
28 atmospheric heat fluxes
29 baseline experiments
30 baseline integration
31 basin
32 changes
33 circulation
34 circulation model
35 clear signal
36 climate
37 components
38 concentration
39 consequences
40 contribution
41 current
42 deep water
43 direct effect
44 direct estimates
45 dominant process
46 drainage basin
47 effect
48 enhanced freshwater input
49 equal parts
50 estimates
51 experiments
52 export
53 feedback
54 flux
55 flux components
56 formation
57 freshwater
58 freshwater flux
59 freshwater input
60 front
61 general circulation model
62 gyre
63 hand
64 heat
65 heat flux
66 hemisphere
67 high latitudes
68 important effect
69 individual flux components
70 input
71 integration
72 latitudes
73 lead
74 levels
75 magnitude
76 model
77 momentum
78 momentum flux
79 net freshwater flux
80 ocean circulation
81 ocean-atmosphere general circulation model
82 oceanic climate
83 overturning
84 part
85 poleward shift
86 position
87 process
88 relative contribution
89 response
90 role
91 role of heat
92 salinity anomalies
93 sea level
94 sensitivity experiments
95 set
96 shift
97 signals
98 similar magnitude
99 southward shift
100 stem
101 strong export
102 study
103 subpolar gyre
104 surface
105 surface warming
106 thermohaline circulation
107 total
108 total response
109 transport lead
110 warming
111 water
112 schema:name The role of the individual air-sea flux components in CO2-induced changes of the ocean's circulation and climate
113 schema:pagination 627-642
114 schema:productId N155c7a585da947a3bd4030033422ed0a
115 N811b08a3674841d2b7fb398aabadbb06
116 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027780110
117 https://doi.org/10.1007/s003820000066
118 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-10-01T06:31
119 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
120 schema:sdPublisher Nbe4c0e47afcb40dfb8b05a783c30bb25
121 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s003820000066
122 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
123 sgo:sdDataset articles
124 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
125 N155c7a585da947a3bd4030033422ed0a schema:name doi
126 schema:value 10.1007/s003820000066
127 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
128 N1a2a18e836b14c2dbb6b6a527734a100 schema:issueNumber 8
129 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
130 N1c136b01bda641248ebae9a096d5ca32 rdf:first sg:person.07735453701.56
131 rdf:rest Nea4690c19f014367b76709dc6ff77d8a
132 N811b08a3674841d2b7fb398aabadbb06 schema:name dimensions_id
133 schema:value pub.1027780110
134 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
135 Nbe4c0e47afcb40dfb8b05a783c30bb25 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
136 rdf:type schema:Organization
137 Nc870107539274cc4a518e6b0a4bf60f9 schema:volumeNumber 16
138 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
139 Nea4690c19f014367b76709dc6ff77d8a rdf:first sg:person.014244276466.52
140 rdf:rest rdf:nil
141 anzsrc-for:04 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
142 schema:name Earth Sciences
143 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
144 anzsrc-for:0405 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
145 schema:name Oceanography
146 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
147 sg:journal.1049631 schema:issn 0930-7575
148 1432-0894
149 schema:name Climate Dynamics
150 schema:publisher Springer Nature
151 rdf:type schema:Periodical
152 sg:person.014244276466.52 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.450268.d
153 schema:familyName Voss
154 schema:givenName R.
155 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.014244276466.52
156 rdf:type schema:Person
157 sg:person.07735453701.56 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.450268.d
158 schema:familyName Mikolajewicz
159 schema:givenName U.
160 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.07735453701.56
161 rdf:type schema:Person
162 grid-institutes:grid.450268.d schema:alternateName Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie, Bundesstr. 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany E-mail: mikolajewicz@dkrz.de, DE
163 schema:name Max-Planck-Institut für Meteorologie, Bundesstr. 55, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany E-mail: mikolajewicz@dkrz.de, DE
164 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...