Is quantum computing with solid state devices possible? View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2003-03

AUTHORS

R.W. Keyes

ABSTRACT

Experiments with a few qubits, the basic elements of a quantum computer, using the methods of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have demonstrated that quantum computing is possible. A useful quantum computer would need to use many qubits, while it appears that NMR with molecules is limited to about ten qubits. The easiest way to assemble a large number of qubits would be to use the existing solid state technology. However, the accuracy with which large numbers of solid state devices can be fabricated does not match the high-precision methods that have made quantum computing with magnetic resonance possible. Quantum computing with solid state devices must expect to encounter a new set of problems posed by differences between nominally identical devices. The difficulties are illustrated with examples of proposed qubits. Specific questions that must be addressed in attempts to use solid state devices for quantum computing are suggested. More... »

PAGES

737-741

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00339-002-1899-1

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00339-002-1899-1

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049603455


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