Morph-specific differences in escape behavior in a color polymorphic lizard View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2022-07-14

AUTHORS

Kinsey M. Brock, Indiana E. Madden

ABSTRACT

Variation in color morph behavior is an important factor in the maintenance of color polymorphism. Alternative anti-predator behaviors are often associated with morphological traits such as coloration, possibly because predator-mediated viability selection favors certain combinations of anti-predator behavior and color. The Aegean wall lizard, Podarcis erhardii, is color polymorphic and populations can have up to three monochromatic morphs: orange, yellow, and white. We investigated whether escape behaviors differ among coexisting color morphs, and if morph behaviors are repeatable across different populations with the same predator species. Specifically, we assessed color morph flight initiation distance (FID), distance to the nearest refuge (DNR), and distance to chosen refuge (DR) in two populations of Aegean wall lizards from Naxos island. We also analyzed the type of refugia color morphs selected and their re-emergence behavior following a standardized approach. We found that orange morphs have different escape behaviors from white and yellow morphs, and these differences are consistent in both populations we sampled. Orange morphs have shorter FIDs, DNRs, and DRs; select different refuge types; and re-emerge less often after being approached compared to white and yellow morphs. Observed differences in color morph escape behaviors support the idea that morphs have evolved alternative behavioral strategies that may play a role in population-level morph maintenance and loss.Significance statementColor polymorphic species often differ in behaviors related to reproduction, but differences in other behaviors are relatively underexplored. In this study, we use an experimental approach in two natural populations of color populations of color polymorphic lizards to determine that color morphs have diverged in their escape behaviors. By conducting our experiments in two different populations with similar predator regimes, we show for the first time that behavioral differences among intra-specific color morphs are repeatable across populations, suggesting that alternative behavioral strategies have evolved in this species. Using this experimental approach, we demonstrate that the brightest orange morph stays closer to refuge than other morphs, uses a different refuge type (vegetation) more often than other morphs (wall crevices), and take much longer to emerge from refuge after a simulated predation event than other morphs. Thus, selective pressures from visual predators may differ between morphs and play a role in the evolution and maintenance of color polymorphisms in these types of systems. Our study species, Podarcis erhardii, belongs to a highly color polymorphic genus (19/23 spp. are color polymorphic) that contains the same three color morphs, thus we believe our results may be relevant to more than just P. erhardii. More... »

PAGES

104

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1149471844


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Ecology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, College of Natural Resources, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.47840.3f", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, College of Natural Resources, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Brock", 
        "givenName": "Kinsey M.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0663546704.47", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0663546704.47"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.27860.3b", 
          "name": [
            "School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Madden", 
        "givenName": "Indiana E.", 
        "id": "sg:person.010245070072.54", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.010245070072.54"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10709-010-9435-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041300711", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10709-010-9435-2"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/380240a0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1016682353", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/380240a0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/srep19815", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1034907626", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/srep19815"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf02207566", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017846289", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02207566"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10682-005-2777-z", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1052535511", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10682-005-2777-z"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-018-2550-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1105914873", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2550-2"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/342542a0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001241604", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/342542a0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/237348a0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033068513", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/237348a0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2022-07-14", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2022-07-14", 
    "description": "Variation in color morph behavior is an important factor in the maintenance of color polymorphism. Alternative anti-predator behaviors are often associated with morphological traits such as coloration, possibly because predator-mediated viability selection favors certain combinations of anti-predator behavior and color. The Aegean wall lizard, Podarcis erhardii, is color polymorphic and populations can have up to three monochromatic morphs: orange, yellow, and white. We investigated whether escape behaviors differ among coexisting color morphs, and if morph behaviors are repeatable across different populations with the same predator species. Specifically, we assessed color morph flight initiation distance (FID), distance to the nearest refuge (DNR), and distance to chosen refuge (DR) in two populations of Aegean wall lizards from Naxos island. We also analyzed the type of refugia color morphs selected and their re-emergence behavior following a standardized approach. We found that orange morphs have different escape behaviors from white and yellow morphs, and these differences are consistent in both populations we sampled. Orange morphs have shorter FIDs, DNRs, and DRs; select different refuge types; and re-emerge less often after being approached compared to white and yellow morphs. Observed differences in color morph escape behaviors support the idea that morphs have evolved alternative behavioral strategies that may play a role in population-level morph maintenance and loss.Significance statementColor polymorphic species often differ in behaviors related to reproduction, but differences in other behaviors are relatively underexplored. In this study, we use an experimental approach in two natural populations of color populations of color polymorphic lizards to determine that color morphs have diverged in their escape behaviors. By conducting our experiments in two different populations with similar predator regimes, we show for the first time that behavioral differences among intra-specific color morphs are repeatable across populations, suggesting that alternative behavioral strategies have evolved in this species. Using this experimental approach, we demonstrate that the brightest orange morph stays closer to refuge than other morphs, uses a different refuge type (vegetation) more often than other morphs\u00a0(wall crevices), and take much longer to emerge from refuge after a simulated predation event than other morphs. Thus, selective pressures from visual predators may differ between morphs and play a role in the evolution and maintenance of color polymorphisms in these types of systems. Our study species, Podarcis erhardii, belongs to a highly color polymorphic genus (19/23 spp. are color polymorphic) that contains the same three color morphs, thus we believe our results may be relevant to more than just P. erhardii.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": true, 
    "isFundedItemOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:grant.9730016", 
        "type": "MonetaryGrant"
      }
    ], 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1085476", 
        "issn": [
          "0340-5443", 
          "1432-0762"
        ], 
        "name": "Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "7", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "76"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "flight initiation distance", 
      "colour polymorphic lizard", 
      "colour morphs", 
      "Aegean wall lizards", 
      "anti-predator behaviour", 
      "alternative behavioral strategies", 
      "orange morph", 
      "polymorphic lizard", 
      "Podarcis erhardii", 
      "colour polymorphism", 
      "wall lizards", 
      "yellow morph", 
      "refuge type", 
      "shorter flight initiation distances", 
      "simulated predation events", 
      "morph-specific differences", 
      "same predator species", 
      "escape behavior", 
      "P. erhardii", 
      "predator regimes", 
      "natural populations", 
      "polymorphic species", 
      "morphological traits", 
      "viability selection", 
      "predator species", 
      "study species", 
      "different populations", 
      "predation events", 
      "visual predators", 
      "selective pressure", 
      "initiation distance", 
      "morphs", 
      "lizards", 
      "experimental approach", 
      "polymorphic genus", 
      "species", 
      "refuge", 
      "nearest refuge", 
      "behavioral strategies", 
      "behavioral differences", 
      "polymorphism", 
      "maintenance", 
      "predators", 
      "genus", 
      "population", 
      "traits", 
      "reproduction", 
      "coloration", 
      "observed differences", 
      "role", 
      "first time", 
      "islands", 
      "color populations", 
      "Naxos Island", 
      "evolution", 
      "selection", 
      "important factor", 
      "types", 
      "variation", 
      "certain combinations", 
      "differences", 
      "strategies", 
      "distance", 
      "color", 
      "loss", 
      "events", 
      "factors", 
      "DNRs", 
      "combination", 
      "experiments", 
      "approach", 
      "study", 
      "behavior", 
      "results", 
      "system", 
      "regime", 
      "time", 
      "standardized approach", 
      "DR", 
      "idea", 
      "pressure", 
      "type of system", 
      "different escape behaviors"
    ], 
    "name": "Morph-specific differences in escape behavior in a color polymorphic lizard", 
    "pagination": "104", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1149471844"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1149471844"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-10-01T06:49", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221001/entities/gbq_results/article/article_925.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

184 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      115 URIs      99 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8 schema:about anzsrc-for:06
2 anzsrc-for:0602
3 schema:author Nd585d29cfef74855980c18b1aa2c68f4
4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/bf02207566
5 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-018-2550-2
6 sg:pub.10.1007/s10682-005-2777-z
7 sg:pub.10.1007/s10709-010-9435-2
8 sg:pub.10.1038/237348a0
9 sg:pub.10.1038/342542a0
10 sg:pub.10.1038/380240a0
11 sg:pub.10.1038/srep19815
12 schema:datePublished 2022-07-14
13 schema:datePublishedReg 2022-07-14
14 schema:description Variation in color morph behavior is an important factor in the maintenance of color polymorphism. Alternative anti-predator behaviors are often associated with morphological traits such as coloration, possibly because predator-mediated viability selection favors certain combinations of anti-predator behavior and color. The Aegean wall lizard, Podarcis erhardii, is color polymorphic and populations can have up to three monochromatic morphs: orange, yellow, and white. We investigated whether escape behaviors differ among coexisting color morphs, and if morph behaviors are repeatable across different populations with the same predator species. Specifically, we assessed color morph flight initiation distance (FID), distance to the nearest refuge (DNR), and distance to chosen refuge (DR) in two populations of Aegean wall lizards from Naxos island. We also analyzed the type of refugia color morphs selected and their re-emergence behavior following a standardized approach. We found that orange morphs have different escape behaviors from white and yellow morphs, and these differences are consistent in both populations we sampled. Orange morphs have shorter FIDs, DNRs, and DRs; select different refuge types; and re-emerge less often after being approached compared to white and yellow morphs. Observed differences in color morph escape behaviors support the idea that morphs have evolved alternative behavioral strategies that may play a role in population-level morph maintenance and loss.Significance statementColor polymorphic species often differ in behaviors related to reproduction, but differences in other behaviors are relatively underexplored. In this study, we use an experimental approach in two natural populations of color populations of color polymorphic lizards to determine that color morphs have diverged in their escape behaviors. By conducting our experiments in two different populations with similar predator regimes, we show for the first time that behavioral differences among intra-specific color morphs are repeatable across populations, suggesting that alternative behavioral strategies have evolved in this species. Using this experimental approach, we demonstrate that the brightest orange morph stays closer to refuge than other morphs, uses a different refuge type (vegetation) more often than other morphs (wall crevices), and take much longer to emerge from refuge after a simulated predation event than other morphs. Thus, selective pressures from visual predators may differ between morphs and play a role in the evolution and maintenance of color polymorphisms in these types of systems. Our study species, Podarcis erhardii, belongs to a highly color polymorphic genus (19/23 spp. are color polymorphic) that contains the same three color morphs, thus we believe our results may be relevant to more than just P. erhardii.
15 schema:genre article
16 schema:isAccessibleForFree true
17 schema:isPartOf N2a52ea8e092344baaa3378376fb80d51
18 Nd659f936489147cbade4bdff139a6f27
19 sg:journal.1085476
20 schema:keywords Aegean wall lizards
21 DNRs
22 DR
23 Naxos Island
24 P. erhardii
25 Podarcis erhardii
26 alternative behavioral strategies
27 anti-predator behaviour
28 approach
29 behavior
30 behavioral differences
31 behavioral strategies
32 certain combinations
33 color
34 color populations
35 coloration
36 colour morphs
37 colour polymorphic lizard
38 colour polymorphism
39 combination
40 differences
41 different escape behaviors
42 different populations
43 distance
44 escape behavior
45 events
46 evolution
47 experimental approach
48 experiments
49 factors
50 first time
51 flight initiation distance
52 genus
53 idea
54 important factor
55 initiation distance
56 islands
57 lizards
58 loss
59 maintenance
60 morph-specific differences
61 morphological traits
62 morphs
63 natural populations
64 nearest refuge
65 observed differences
66 orange morph
67 polymorphic genus
68 polymorphic lizard
69 polymorphic species
70 polymorphism
71 population
72 predation events
73 predator regimes
74 predator species
75 predators
76 pressure
77 refuge
78 refuge type
79 regime
80 reproduction
81 results
82 role
83 same predator species
84 selection
85 selective pressure
86 shorter flight initiation distances
87 simulated predation events
88 species
89 standardized approach
90 strategies
91 study
92 study species
93 system
94 time
95 traits
96 type of system
97 types
98 variation
99 viability selection
100 visual predators
101 wall lizards
102 yellow morph
103 schema:name Morph-specific differences in escape behavior in a color polymorphic lizard
104 schema:pagination 104
105 schema:productId N4d6897d09f3d429aa293605ffdd66f50
106 Nbbfe52e656f244f6b2c188e98ef465a0
107 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1149471844
108 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8
109 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-10-01T06:49
110 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
111 schema:sdPublisher N70cf11c065bc4ff2a76a067e34a9ad15
112 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8
113 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
114 sgo:sdDataset articles
115 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
116 N2a52ea8e092344baaa3378376fb80d51 schema:volumeNumber 76
117 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
118 N34c9a58ba77b44f7b54900ba22fe8514 rdf:first sg:person.010245070072.54
119 rdf:rest rdf:nil
120 N4d6897d09f3d429aa293605ffdd66f50 schema:name dimensions_id
121 schema:value pub.1149471844
122 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
123 N70cf11c065bc4ff2a76a067e34a9ad15 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
124 rdf:type schema:Organization
125 Nbbfe52e656f244f6b2c188e98ef465a0 schema:name doi
126 schema:value 10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8
127 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
128 Nd585d29cfef74855980c18b1aa2c68f4 rdf:first sg:person.0663546704.47
129 rdf:rest N34c9a58ba77b44f7b54900ba22fe8514
130 Nd659f936489147cbade4bdff139a6f27 schema:issueNumber 7
131 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
132 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
133 schema:name Biological Sciences
134 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
135 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
136 schema:name Ecology
137 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
138 sg:grant.9730016 http://pending.schema.org/fundedItem sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03211-8
139 rdf:type schema:MonetaryGrant
140 sg:journal.1085476 schema:issn 0340-5443
141 1432-0762
142 schema:name Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
143 schema:publisher Springer Nature
144 rdf:type schema:Periodical
145 sg:person.010245070072.54 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.27860.3b
146 schema:familyName Madden
147 schema:givenName Indiana E.
148 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.010245070072.54
149 rdf:type schema:Person
150 sg:person.0663546704.47 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.47840.3f
151 schema:familyName Brock
152 schema:givenName Kinsey M.
153 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0663546704.47
154 rdf:type schema:Person
155 sg:pub.10.1007/bf02207566 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017846289
156 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02207566
157 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
158 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-018-2550-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1105914873
159 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-018-2550-2
160 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
161 sg:pub.10.1007/s10682-005-2777-z schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1052535511
162 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10682-005-2777-z
163 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
164 sg:pub.10.1007/s10709-010-9435-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041300711
165 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10709-010-9435-2
166 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
167 sg:pub.10.1038/237348a0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033068513
168 https://doi.org/10.1038/237348a0
169 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
170 sg:pub.10.1038/342542a0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001241604
171 https://doi.org/10.1038/342542a0
172 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
173 sg:pub.10.1038/380240a0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1016682353
174 https://doi.org/10.1038/380240a0
175 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
176 sg:pub.10.1038/srep19815 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1034907626
177 https://doi.org/10.1038/srep19815
178 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
179 grid-institutes:grid.27860.3b schema:alternateName School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA
180 schema:name School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA
181 rdf:type schema:Organization
182 grid-institutes:grid.47840.3f schema:alternateName Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, College of Natural Resources, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
183 schema:name Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, College of Natural Resources, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
184 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...