Male–male associations in spotted bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus maculatus) exhibit attributes of courtship coalitions View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2022-07-07

AUTHORS

Giovanni Spezie, Leonida Fusani

ABSTRACT

Despite strong selective pressures inherent in competition for mates, in species with non-resource-based mating systems males commonly engage in non-agonistic interactions with same-sex visitors at display arenas. Bowerbirds perform courtship dances on elaborate display structures — known as bowers — that are built and defended by one resident male. Several reports have suggested that bower owners tolerate the presence of specific male visitors at their display arenas, referred to here as ‘subordinates’. Subordinate males may learn the skills required for successful sexual signalling via prolonged social interactions at adults’ arenas, but little is known about whether courtship proficiency changes with experience and/or whether subordinates actively contribute to enhancing the resident male’s mating success. In this study, we investigated male-male associations in wild spotted bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus maculatus). We first sought to determine whether courtship behaviour differs based on bower ownership status. We then examined whether social interactions between bower owners and subordinate males may qualify as courtship coalitions. Our analysis of courtship postural components did not reveal differences in timing or relative occurrence of postural components between subordinate males and bower owners, whereas we found evidence that male-male associations in spotted bowerbirds may provide an example of rudimentary courtship coalitions. In particular, higher subordinate attendance is associated with lower destruction rates by neighbouring rivals and with overall higher mating success, and male pairs are stable in subsequent years. This study provides novel information about social dynamics among male bowerbirds, and further insights into the evolution of coalitionary behaviour in male displays.Significance statementSame-sex associations between established males and subordinate visitors on display arenas are common in birds, yet poorly understood. Using video recordings from a population of wild spotted bowerbirds, Ptilonorhynchus maculatus, we performed a quantitative analysis on motor courtship components across males, and on their social interactions on display arenas to investigate the nature of male–male partnerships. Our results showed that motor courtship performance in subordinate visitors is not suggestive of an early ontogenetic stage, as previously speculated. Moreover, though bower ‘owners’ and subordinate males do not coordinate their behaviour during courtship or bower building, male–male partnerships may qualify as a rudimentary or incipient form of courtship coalitions. Subordinate males are tolerated at bowers, the magnitude of subordinate attendance correlates with owner males’ mating success, and repeated interactions between individuals reveal consistent partner associations. More... »

PAGES

97

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1149306941

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35818498


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Ecology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.6583.8", 
          "name": [
            "Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Spezie", 
        "givenName": "Giovanni", 
        "id": "sg:person.014547517671.47", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.014547517671.47"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.10420.37", 
          "name": [
            "Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria", 
            "Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Fusani", 
        "givenName": "Leonida", 
        "id": "sg:person.0713100512.71", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0713100512.71"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/415279a", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1053328730", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/415279a"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-0-387-21706-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1035613449", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-21706-2"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10071-007-0092-5", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030346435", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-007-0092-5"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/nature03325", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036942171", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/nature03325"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-003-0583-6", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1086068860", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-003-0583-6"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10336-019-01627-0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1111834798", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-019-01627-0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/nature02419", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047184854", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/nature02419"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-3242-6", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1109705877", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-3242-6"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00165962", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1029074835", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00165962"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/s41593-018-0209-y", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1106100351", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/s41593-018-0209-y"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10336-011-0809-8", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031003515", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-011-0809-8"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11692-010-9105-4", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039659983", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11692-010-9105-4"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00302934", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1004781703", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00302934"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2022-07-07", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2022-07-07", 
    "description": "Despite strong selective pressures inherent in competition for mates, in species with non-resource-based mating systems males commonly engage in non-agonistic interactions with same-sex visitors at display arenas. Bowerbirds perform courtship dances on elaborate display structures \u2014 known as bowers \u2014 that are built and defended by one resident male. Several reports have suggested that bower owners tolerate the presence of specific male visitors at their display arenas, referred to here as \u2018subordinates\u2019. Subordinate males may learn the skills required for successful sexual signalling via prolonged social interactions at adults\u2019 arenas, but little is known about whether courtship proficiency changes with experience and/or whether subordinates actively contribute to enhancing the resident male\u2019s mating success. In this study, we investigated male-male associations in wild spotted bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus maculatus). We first sought to determine whether courtship behaviour differs based on bower\u00a0ownership status. We then examined whether social interactions between bower owners and subordinate males may qualify as courtship coalitions. Our analysis of courtship postural components did not reveal differences in timing or relative occurrence of postural components between subordinate males and bower owners, whereas we found evidence that male-male associations in spotted bowerbirds may provide an example of rudimentary courtship coalitions. In particular, higher subordinate attendance is associated with lower destruction rates by neighbouring rivals and with overall higher mating success, and male pairs are stable in subsequent years. This study provides novel information about social dynamics among male bowerbirds, and further insights into the evolution of coalitionary behaviour in male displays.Significance statementSame-sex associations between established males and subordinate visitors on display arenas are common in birds, yet poorly understood. Using video recordings from a population of wild spotted bowerbirds, Ptilonorhynchus maculatus, we performed a quantitative analysis on motor courtship components across males, and on their social interactions on display arenas to investigate the nature of male\u2013male partnerships. Our results showed that motor courtship performance in subordinate visitors is not suggestive of an early ontogenetic stage, as previously speculated. Moreover, though bower \u2018owners\u2019 and subordinate males do not coordinate their behaviour during courtship or bower building, male\u2013male partnerships may qualify as a rudimentary or incipient form of courtship coalitions. Subordinate males are tolerated at bowers, the magnitude of subordinate attendance correlates with owner males\u2019 mating success, and repeated interactions between individuals reveal consistent partner associations.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": true, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1085476", 
        "issn": [
          "0340-5443", 
          "1432-0762"
        ], 
        "name": "Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "7", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "76"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "male-male associations", 
      "bower owners", 
      "mating success", 
      "display arenas", 
      "subordinate males", 
      "male-male partnerships", 
      "male mating success", 
      "higher mating success", 
      "strong selective pressure", 
      "early ontogenetic stages", 
      "sexual signalling", 
      "owner males", 
      "selective pressure", 
      "elaborate displays", 
      "male displays", 
      "bower building", 
      "courtship dance", 
      "Male bowerbirds", 
      "courtship components", 
      "courtship performance", 
      "ontogenetic stages", 
      "bowerbirds", 
      "prolonged social interactions", 
      "resident males", 
      "coalitionary behavior", 
      "novel information", 
      "relative occurrence", 
      "lowest destruction rates", 
      "exhibit attributes", 
      "further insight", 
      "partner associations", 
      "male pairs", 
      "signaling", 
      "maculatus", 
      "courtship", 
      "mates", 
      "species", 
      "birds", 
      "interaction", 
      "incipient form", 
      "males", 
      "subsequent years", 
      "components", 
      "evolution", 
      "association", 
      "insights", 
      "population", 
      "competition", 
      "male visitors", 
      "success", 
      "non-agonistic interactions", 
      "differs", 
      "Bowers", 
      "analysis", 
      "visitors", 
      "pairs", 
      "quantitative analysis", 
      "stage", 
      "behavior differs", 
      "dynamics", 
      "display", 
      "presence", 
      "timing", 
      "evidence", 
      "study", 
      "occurrence", 
      "individuals", 
      "social interaction", 
      "postural component", 
      "form", 
      "correlates", 
      "status", 
      "differences", 
      "nature", 
      "subordinates", 
      "information", 
      "results", 
      "attributes", 
      "arena", 
      "rivals", 
      "report", 
      "rate", 
      "social dynamics", 
      "adults", 
      "example", 
      "behavior", 
      "video recordings", 
      "years", 
      "magnitude", 
      "pressure", 
      "recordings", 
      "dance", 
      "partnership", 
      "ownership status", 
      "proficiency", 
      "destruction rate", 
      "owners", 
      "coalition", 
      "performance", 
      "buildings", 
      "attendance", 
      "experience", 
      "skills"
    ], 
    "name": "Male\u2013male associations in spotted bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus maculatus) exhibit attributes of courtship coalitions", 
    "pagination": "97", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1149306941"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "pubmed_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "35818498"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1149306941"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-10-01T06:50", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221001/entities/gbq_results/article/article_945.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

227 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      141 URIs      120 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x schema:about anzsrc-for:06
2 anzsrc-for:0602
3 schema:author N82c474277c1643ec8ad6b2e72162fef7
4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/978-0-387-21706-2
5 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-3242-6
6 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00165962
7 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00302934
8 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-003-0583-6
9 sg:pub.10.1007/s10071-007-0092-5
10 sg:pub.10.1007/s10336-011-0809-8
11 sg:pub.10.1007/s10336-019-01627-0
12 sg:pub.10.1007/s11692-010-9105-4
13 sg:pub.10.1038/415279a
14 sg:pub.10.1038/nature02419
15 sg:pub.10.1038/nature03325
16 sg:pub.10.1038/s41593-018-0209-y
17 schema:datePublished 2022-07-07
18 schema:datePublishedReg 2022-07-07
19 schema:description Despite strong selective pressures inherent in competition for mates, in species with non-resource-based mating systems males commonly engage in non-agonistic interactions with same-sex visitors at display arenas. Bowerbirds perform courtship dances on elaborate display structures — known as bowers — that are built and defended by one resident male. Several reports have suggested that bower owners tolerate the presence of specific male visitors at their display arenas, referred to here as ‘subordinates’. Subordinate males may learn the skills required for successful sexual signalling via prolonged social interactions at adults’ arenas, but little is known about whether courtship proficiency changes with experience and/or whether subordinates actively contribute to enhancing the resident male’s mating success. In this study, we investigated male-male associations in wild spotted bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus maculatus). We first sought to determine whether courtship behaviour differs based on bower ownership status. We then examined whether social interactions between bower owners and subordinate males may qualify as courtship coalitions. Our analysis of courtship postural components did not reveal differences in timing or relative occurrence of postural components between subordinate males and bower owners, whereas we found evidence that male-male associations in spotted bowerbirds may provide an example of rudimentary courtship coalitions. In particular, higher subordinate attendance is associated with lower destruction rates by neighbouring rivals and with overall higher mating success, and male pairs are stable in subsequent years. This study provides novel information about social dynamics among male bowerbirds, and further insights into the evolution of coalitionary behaviour in male displays.Significance statementSame-sex associations between established males and subordinate visitors on display arenas are common in birds, yet poorly understood. Using video recordings from a population of wild spotted bowerbirds, Ptilonorhynchus maculatus, we performed a quantitative analysis on motor courtship components across males, and on their social interactions on display arenas to investigate the nature of male–male partnerships. Our results showed that motor courtship performance in subordinate visitors is not suggestive of an early ontogenetic stage, as previously speculated. Moreover, though bower ‘owners’ and subordinate males do not coordinate their behaviour during courtship or bower building, male–male partnerships may qualify as a rudimentary or incipient form of courtship coalitions. Subordinate males are tolerated at bowers, the magnitude of subordinate attendance correlates with owner males’ mating success, and repeated interactions between individuals reveal consistent partner associations.
20 schema:genre article
21 schema:isAccessibleForFree true
22 schema:isPartOf N2f1c406d6e984e44ada5f6e6e8a8061c
23 Neb74ef6104b64f16823bda08d5109a31
24 sg:journal.1085476
25 schema:keywords Bowers
26 Male bowerbirds
27 adults
28 analysis
29 arena
30 association
31 attendance
32 attributes
33 behavior
34 behavior differs
35 birds
36 bower building
37 bower owners
38 bowerbirds
39 buildings
40 coalition
41 coalitionary behavior
42 competition
43 components
44 correlates
45 courtship
46 courtship components
47 courtship dance
48 courtship performance
49 dance
50 destruction rate
51 differences
52 differs
53 display
54 display arenas
55 dynamics
56 early ontogenetic stages
57 elaborate displays
58 evidence
59 evolution
60 example
61 exhibit attributes
62 experience
63 form
64 further insight
65 higher mating success
66 incipient form
67 individuals
68 information
69 insights
70 interaction
71 lowest destruction rates
72 maculatus
73 magnitude
74 male displays
75 male mating success
76 male pairs
77 male visitors
78 male-male associations
79 male-male partnerships
80 males
81 mates
82 mating success
83 nature
84 non-agonistic interactions
85 novel information
86 occurrence
87 ontogenetic stages
88 owner males
89 owners
90 ownership status
91 pairs
92 partner associations
93 partnership
94 performance
95 population
96 postural component
97 presence
98 pressure
99 proficiency
100 prolonged social interactions
101 quantitative analysis
102 rate
103 recordings
104 relative occurrence
105 report
106 resident males
107 results
108 rivals
109 selective pressure
110 sexual signalling
111 signaling
112 skills
113 social dynamics
114 social interaction
115 species
116 stage
117 status
118 strong selective pressure
119 study
120 subordinate males
121 subordinates
122 subsequent years
123 success
124 timing
125 video recordings
126 visitors
127 years
128 schema:name Male–male associations in spotted bowerbirds (Ptilonorhynchus maculatus) exhibit attributes of courtship coalitions
129 schema:pagination 97
130 schema:productId N1e7a967a2690409295858edad9c7c54a
131 N8b71a05c13a04442a49898c1046402c8
132 Ndfd1ca9addb14e01affa7b6260936fae
133 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1149306941
134 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x
135 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-10-01T06:50
136 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
137 schema:sdPublisher N9a8dc8b4ede54d92af5560430dc040e4
138 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x
139 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
140 sgo:sdDataset articles
141 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
142 N0ddb441b4f434f42add8d65a720c0e8e rdf:first sg:person.0713100512.71
143 rdf:rest rdf:nil
144 N1e7a967a2690409295858edad9c7c54a schema:name doi
145 schema:value 10.1007/s00265-022-03200-x
146 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
147 N2f1c406d6e984e44ada5f6e6e8a8061c schema:volumeNumber 76
148 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
149 N82c474277c1643ec8ad6b2e72162fef7 rdf:first sg:person.014547517671.47
150 rdf:rest N0ddb441b4f434f42add8d65a720c0e8e
151 N8b71a05c13a04442a49898c1046402c8 schema:name dimensions_id
152 schema:value pub.1149306941
153 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
154 N9a8dc8b4ede54d92af5560430dc040e4 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
155 rdf:type schema:Organization
156 Ndfd1ca9addb14e01affa7b6260936fae schema:name pubmed_id
157 schema:value 35818498
158 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
159 Neb74ef6104b64f16823bda08d5109a31 schema:issueNumber 7
160 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
161 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
162 schema:name Biological Sciences
163 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
164 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
165 schema:name Ecology
166 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
167 sg:journal.1085476 schema:issn 0340-5443
168 1432-0762
169 schema:name Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
170 schema:publisher Springer Nature
171 rdf:type schema:Periodical
172 sg:person.014547517671.47 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.6583.8
173 schema:familyName Spezie
174 schema:givenName Giovanni
175 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.014547517671.47
176 rdf:type schema:Person
177 sg:person.0713100512.71 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.10420.37
178 schema:familyName Fusani
179 schema:givenName Leonida
180 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0713100512.71
181 rdf:type schema:Person
182 sg:pub.10.1007/978-0-387-21706-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1035613449
183 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-21706-2
184 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
185 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-3242-6 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1109705877
186 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-3242-6
187 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
188 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00165962 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1029074835
189 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00165962
190 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
191 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00302934 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1004781703
192 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00302934
193 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
194 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-003-0583-6 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1086068860
195 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-003-0583-6
196 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
197 sg:pub.10.1007/s10071-007-0092-5 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030346435
198 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10071-007-0092-5
199 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
200 sg:pub.10.1007/s10336-011-0809-8 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031003515
201 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-011-0809-8
202 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
203 sg:pub.10.1007/s10336-019-01627-0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1111834798
204 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10336-019-01627-0
205 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
206 sg:pub.10.1007/s11692-010-9105-4 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039659983
207 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11692-010-9105-4
208 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
209 sg:pub.10.1038/415279a schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1053328730
210 https://doi.org/10.1038/415279a
211 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
212 sg:pub.10.1038/nature02419 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047184854
213 https://doi.org/10.1038/nature02419
214 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
215 sg:pub.10.1038/nature03325 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036942171
216 https://doi.org/10.1038/nature03325
217 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
218 sg:pub.10.1038/s41593-018-0209-y schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1106100351
219 https://doi.org/10.1038/s41593-018-0209-y
220 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
221 grid-institutes:grid.10420.37 schema:alternateName Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
222 schema:name Department of Behavioural and Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
223 Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
224 rdf:type schema:Organization
225 grid-institutes:grid.6583.8 schema:alternateName Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
226 schema:name Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
227 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...