Do female amphibians and reptiles have greater reproductive output if they have more mates? View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2022-07-07

AUTHORS

Patricia L. M. Lee, Craig D. H. Sherman, Lee A. Rollins, Erik Wapstra, Karl P. Phillips

ABSTRACT

In general, males mate with multiple females to increase individual reproductive success. Whether or not, and under what circumstances, females benefit from multiple mating has been less clear. Our review of 154 studies covering 184 populations of amphibians and reptiles showed that polyandry was widespread and variable among and within taxonomic groups. We investigated whether amphibian and reptile females had greater reproductive output as the number of sires for offspring increased. Meta-analysis revealed significant heterogeneity in the dataset of all taxa. Expected heterozygosity was a significant moderator (covariate) of positive relationships between female reproductive output and the number of sires, but a sensitivity test showed the result was tenuous. Significant heterogeneity remained despite controlling for expected heterozygosity and other variables but was resolved for most taxonomic groups with subgroup meta-analyses. Subgroup meta-analyses showed that only female salamanders (Caudata) had significantly greater reproductive output with an increased number of sires. For many species of Caudata, males cannot coerce females into accepting spermatophores. We therefore suggest that if females control the number of matings, they can use polyandry to increase their fitness. Caudata offers ideal models with which to test this hypothesis and to explore factors enabling and maintaining the evolution of female choice. Outstanding problems may be addressed by expanding taxonomic coverage and data collection and improving data reporting. Significance StatementMany factors and combinations of factors drive polyandry. Whether or not females benefit from mating with more than one male remains equivocal. Focusing on amphibians and reptiles, our analyses demonstrate that female salamanders produced more offspring when mated with multiple males, whereas this was not the case for reptiles. Unlike many other species in our dataset, the polyandrous female salamanders fully control sperm intake and have chosen to mate multiple times. We further highlight problems and key directions for future research in the field. More... »

PAGES

96

References to SciGraph publications

  • 2008-04-13. Mating system, multiple paternity and effective population size in the endemic flatback turtle (Natator depressus) in Australia in CONSERVATION GENETICS
  • 2014-07-19. Female reproductive qualities affect male painted turtle (Chrysemys picta marginata) reproductive success in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1992-04. Multiple paternity in a wild population of northern water snakes, Nerodia sipedon in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1998-10. Social monogamy and extra-pair fertilization in an Australian lizard, Tiliqua rugosa in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 2013-05-16. Spatial aspects of movements, mating patterns, and nest distributions influence gene flow among population subunits of Blanding’s turtles (Emydoidea blandingii) in CONSERVATION GENETICS
  • 1948-12. Intra-sexual selection in Drosophila in HEREDITY
  • 2002-07-24. Multiple paternity and female-biased mutation at a microsatellite locus in the olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) in HEREDITY
  • 2002-01. Multiple paternity, sperm storage, and reproductive success of female and male painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) in nature in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 2001-01. Multiple insemination increases reproductive success of female Montandon’s newt (Triturus montandoni, Caudata, Salamandridae) in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 2007-08-10. Reproductive and Mating Success in the Small-Mouthed Salamander (Ambystoma texanum) Estimated via Microsatellite Parentage Analysis in EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1149306940


    Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
    Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

    JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

    TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

    [
      {
        "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
        "about": [
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Biological Sciences", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0604", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Genetics", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }
        ], 
        "author": [
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.1021.2", 
              "name": [
                "School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Lee", 
            "givenName": "Patricia L. M.", 
            "id": "sg:person.01202341532.14", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01202341532.14"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.1021.2", 
              "name": [
                "School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Sherman", 
            "givenName": "Craig D. H.", 
            "id": "sg:person.0672265623.30", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0672265623.30"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "Evolution & Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.1005.4", 
              "name": [
                "Evolution & Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Rollins", 
            "givenName": "Lee A.", 
            "id": "sg:person.01126001775.12", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01126001775.12"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "School of Natural Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.1009.8", 
              "name": [
                "School of Natural Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Wapstra", 
            "givenName": "Erik", 
            "id": "sg:person.01053032515.34", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01053032515.34"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.7872.a", 
              "name": [
                "School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Phillips", 
            "givenName": "Karl P.", 
            "id": "sg:person.01125503644.08", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01125503644.08"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }
        ], 
        "citation": [
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10592-008-9583-4", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002533526", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10592-008-9583-4"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00166703", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1051546996", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00166703"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s002650000277", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033129350", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s002650000277"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s002650050515", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031269389", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s002650050515"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/hdy.1948.21", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032768392", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1038/hdy.1948.21"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s11692-007-9009-0", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1005235736", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s11692-007-9009-0"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-014-1768-x", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011445280", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-014-1768-x"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-001-0421-7", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1006926041", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-001-0421-7"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/sj.hdy.6800103", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019875186", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.hdy.6800103"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s10592-013-0493-8", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1044815940", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/s10592-013-0493-8"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }
        ], 
        "datePublished": "2022-07-07", 
        "datePublishedReg": "2022-07-07", 
        "description": "In general, males mate with multiple females to increase individual reproductive success. Whether or not, and under what circumstances, females benefit from multiple mating has been less clear. Our review of 154 studies covering 184 populations of amphibians and reptiles showed that polyandry was widespread and variable among and within taxonomic groups. We investigated whether amphibian and reptile females had greater reproductive output as the number of sires for offspring increased. Meta-analysis revealed significant heterogeneity in the dataset of all taxa. Expected heterozygosity was a significant moderator (covariate) of positive relationships between female reproductive output and the number of sires, but a sensitivity test showed the result was tenuous. Significant heterogeneity remained despite controlling for expected heterozygosity and other variables but was resolved for most taxonomic groups with subgroup meta-analyses. Subgroup meta-analyses showed that only female salamanders (Caudata) had significantly greater reproductive output with an increased number of sires. For many species of Caudata, males cannot coerce females into accepting spermatophores. We therefore suggest that if females control the number of matings, they can use polyandry to increase their fitness. Caudata offers ideal models with which to test this hypothesis and to explore factors enabling and maintaining the evolution of female choice. Outstanding problems may be addressed by expanding taxonomic coverage and data collection and improving data reporting. Significance StatementMany factors and combinations of factors drive polyandry. Whether or not females benefit from mating with more than one male remains equivocal. Focusing on amphibians and reptiles, our analyses demonstrate that female salamanders produced more offspring when mated with multiple males, whereas this was not the case for reptiles. Unlike many other species in our dataset, the polyandrous female salamanders fully control sperm intake and have chosen to mate multiple times. We further highlight problems and key directions for future research in the field.", 
        "genre": "article", 
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6", 
        "isAccessibleForFree": true, 
        "isPartOf": [
          {
            "id": "sg:journal.1085476", 
            "issn": [
              "0340-5443", 
              "1432-0762"
            ], 
            "name": "Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology", 
            "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
            "type": "Periodical"
          }, 
          {
            "issueNumber": "7", 
            "type": "PublicationIssue"
          }, 
          {
            "type": "PublicationVolume", 
            "volumeNumber": "76"
          }
        ], 
        "keywords": [
          "greater reproductive output", 
          "number of sires", 
          "reproductive output", 
          "female salamanders", 
          "taxonomic groups", 
          "individual reproductive success", 
          "populations of amphibians", 
          "most taxonomic groups", 
          "female reproductive output", 
          "number of matings", 
          "multiple mating", 
          "female choice", 
          "taxonomic coverage", 
          "reproductive success", 
          "multiple males", 
          "more mates", 
          "expected heterozygosity", 
          "multiple females", 
          "more offspring", 
          "polyandry", 
          "reptiles", 
          "amphibians", 
          "salamanders", 
          "caudata", 
          "heterozygosity", 
          "mating", 
          "species", 
          "ideal model", 
          "sires", 
          "offspring", 
          "taxa", 
          "multiple times", 
          "spermatophores", 
          "mates", 
          "females", 
          "female amphibians", 
          "fitness", 
          "combination of factors", 
          "males", 
          "heterogeneity", 
          "positive relationship", 
          "evolution", 
          "factors", 
          "number", 
          "population", 
          "hypothesis", 
          "significant heterogeneity", 
          "analysis", 
          "dataset", 
          "collection", 
          "success", 
          "review", 
          "outstanding problems", 
          "combination", 
          "group", 
          "relationship", 
          "future research", 
          "study", 
          "results", 
          "subgroups", 
          "highlight problems", 
          "key directions", 
          "sensitivity tests", 
          "time", 
          "research", 
          "model", 
          "output", 
          "field", 
          "coverage", 
          "choice", 
          "intake", 
          "circumstances", 
          "direction", 
          "test", 
          "variables", 
          "data reporting", 
          "cases", 
          "data collection", 
          "problem", 
          "reporting", 
          "significant moderator", 
          "moderator"
        ], 
        "name": "Do female amphibians and reptiles have greater reproductive output if they have more mates?", 
        "pagination": "96", 
        "productId": [
          {
            "name": "dimensions_id", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "pub.1149306940"
            ]
          }, 
          {
            "name": "doi", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6"
            ]
          }
        ], 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6", 
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1149306940"
        ], 
        "sdDataset": "articles", 
        "sdDatePublished": "2022-09-02T16:07", 
        "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
        "sdPublisher": {
          "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220902/entities/gbq_results/article/article_938.jsonl", 
        "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
        "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6"
      }
    ]
     

    Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

    HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

    JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6'

    N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6'

    Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

    curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6'

    RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6'


     

    This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

    216 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      116 URIs      98 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6 schema:about anzsrc-for:06
    2 anzsrc-for:0604
    3 schema:author Na7ec7548aca8474eb323a24a008c8148
    4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/bf00166703
    5 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-001-0421-7
    6 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-014-1768-x
    7 sg:pub.10.1007/s002650000277
    8 sg:pub.10.1007/s002650050515
    9 sg:pub.10.1007/s10592-008-9583-4
    10 sg:pub.10.1007/s10592-013-0493-8
    11 sg:pub.10.1007/s11692-007-9009-0
    12 sg:pub.10.1038/hdy.1948.21
    13 sg:pub.10.1038/sj.hdy.6800103
    14 schema:datePublished 2022-07-07
    15 schema:datePublishedReg 2022-07-07
    16 schema:description In general, males mate with multiple females to increase individual reproductive success. Whether or not, and under what circumstances, females benefit from multiple mating has been less clear. Our review of 154 studies covering 184 populations of amphibians and reptiles showed that polyandry was widespread and variable among and within taxonomic groups. We investigated whether amphibian and reptile females had greater reproductive output as the number of sires for offspring increased. Meta-analysis revealed significant heterogeneity in the dataset of all taxa. Expected heterozygosity was a significant moderator (covariate) of positive relationships between female reproductive output and the number of sires, but a sensitivity test showed the result was tenuous. Significant heterogeneity remained despite controlling for expected heterozygosity and other variables but was resolved for most taxonomic groups with subgroup meta-analyses. Subgroup meta-analyses showed that only female salamanders (Caudata) had significantly greater reproductive output with an increased number of sires. For many species of Caudata, males cannot coerce females into accepting spermatophores. We therefore suggest that if females control the number of matings, they can use polyandry to increase their fitness. Caudata offers ideal models with which to test this hypothesis and to explore factors enabling and maintaining the evolution of female choice. Outstanding problems may be addressed by expanding taxonomic coverage and data collection and improving data reporting. Significance StatementMany factors and combinations of factors drive polyandry. Whether or not females benefit from mating with more than one male remains equivocal. Focusing on amphibians and reptiles, our analyses demonstrate that female salamanders produced more offspring when mated with multiple males, whereas this was not the case for reptiles. Unlike many other species in our dataset, the polyandrous female salamanders fully control sperm intake and have chosen to mate multiple times. We further highlight problems and key directions for future research in the field.
    17 schema:genre article
    18 schema:isAccessibleForFree true
    19 schema:isPartOf N7cd30b74c70c40d99e61ace86df6cf46
    20 Nb047baa700c44165b6b7195a4d08077e
    21 sg:journal.1085476
    22 schema:keywords amphibians
    23 analysis
    24 cases
    25 caudata
    26 choice
    27 circumstances
    28 collection
    29 combination
    30 combination of factors
    31 coverage
    32 data collection
    33 data reporting
    34 dataset
    35 direction
    36 evolution
    37 expected heterozygosity
    38 factors
    39 female amphibians
    40 female choice
    41 female reproductive output
    42 female salamanders
    43 females
    44 field
    45 fitness
    46 future research
    47 greater reproductive output
    48 group
    49 heterogeneity
    50 heterozygosity
    51 highlight problems
    52 hypothesis
    53 ideal model
    54 individual reproductive success
    55 intake
    56 key directions
    57 males
    58 mates
    59 mating
    60 model
    61 moderator
    62 more mates
    63 more offspring
    64 most taxonomic groups
    65 multiple females
    66 multiple males
    67 multiple mating
    68 multiple times
    69 number
    70 number of matings
    71 number of sires
    72 offspring
    73 output
    74 outstanding problems
    75 polyandry
    76 population
    77 populations of amphibians
    78 positive relationship
    79 problem
    80 relationship
    81 reporting
    82 reproductive output
    83 reproductive success
    84 reptiles
    85 research
    86 results
    87 review
    88 salamanders
    89 sensitivity tests
    90 significant heterogeneity
    91 significant moderator
    92 sires
    93 species
    94 spermatophores
    95 study
    96 subgroups
    97 success
    98 taxa
    99 taxonomic coverage
    100 taxonomic groups
    101 test
    102 time
    103 variables
    104 schema:name Do female amphibians and reptiles have greater reproductive output if they have more mates?
    105 schema:pagination 96
    106 schema:productId N35486d83b6e949e7a4434f452d93435e
    107 N4ec1a3887307477688a2fa706738680f
    108 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1149306940
    109 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6
    110 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-09-02T16:07
    111 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    112 schema:sdPublisher N0af3dc2cea1e475fbf9b5264ab06a2e2
    113 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6
    114 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
    115 sgo:sdDataset articles
    116 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
    117 N0af3dc2cea1e475fbf9b5264ab06a2e2 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
    118 rdf:type schema:Organization
    119 N115189ea9d184be0a6ccadd69e2072dd rdf:first sg:person.01125503644.08
    120 rdf:rest rdf:nil
    121 N15370fb4aca045488cbc458a472d2a3f rdf:first sg:person.01053032515.34
    122 rdf:rest N115189ea9d184be0a6ccadd69e2072dd
    123 N2cd4f16e40284da8ba4398778584e25a rdf:first sg:person.0672265623.30
    124 rdf:rest Nab3c308306f544cabcf4b1a94d1368c2
    125 N35486d83b6e949e7a4434f452d93435e schema:name dimensions_id
    126 schema:value pub.1149306940
    127 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    128 N4ec1a3887307477688a2fa706738680f schema:name doi
    129 schema:value 10.1007/s00265-022-03194-6
    130 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    131 N7cd30b74c70c40d99e61ace86df6cf46 schema:issueNumber 7
    132 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
    133 Na7ec7548aca8474eb323a24a008c8148 rdf:first sg:person.01202341532.14
    134 rdf:rest N2cd4f16e40284da8ba4398778584e25a
    135 Nab3c308306f544cabcf4b1a94d1368c2 rdf:first sg:person.01126001775.12
    136 rdf:rest N15370fb4aca045488cbc458a472d2a3f
    137 Nb047baa700c44165b6b7195a4d08077e schema:volumeNumber 76
    138 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
    139 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    140 schema:name Biological Sciences
    141 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    142 anzsrc-for:0604 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    143 schema:name Genetics
    144 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    145 sg:journal.1085476 schema:issn 0340-5443
    146 1432-0762
    147 schema:name Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
    148 schema:publisher Springer Nature
    149 rdf:type schema:Periodical
    150 sg:person.01053032515.34 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.1009.8
    151 schema:familyName Wapstra
    152 schema:givenName Erik
    153 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01053032515.34
    154 rdf:type schema:Person
    155 sg:person.01125503644.08 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.7872.a
    156 schema:familyName Phillips
    157 schema:givenName Karl P.
    158 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01125503644.08
    159 rdf:type schema:Person
    160 sg:person.01126001775.12 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.1005.4
    161 schema:familyName Rollins
    162 schema:givenName Lee A.
    163 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01126001775.12
    164 rdf:type schema:Person
    165 sg:person.01202341532.14 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.1021.2
    166 schema:familyName Lee
    167 schema:givenName Patricia L. M.
    168 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01202341532.14
    169 rdf:type schema:Person
    170 sg:person.0672265623.30 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.1021.2
    171 schema:familyName Sherman
    172 schema:givenName Craig D. H.
    173 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0672265623.30
    174 rdf:type schema:Person
    175 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00166703 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1051546996
    176 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00166703
    177 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    178 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-001-0421-7 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1006926041
    179 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-001-0421-7
    180 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    181 sg:pub.10.1007/s00265-014-1768-x schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011445280
    182 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00265-014-1768-x
    183 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    184 sg:pub.10.1007/s002650000277 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033129350
    185 https://doi.org/10.1007/s002650000277
    186 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    187 sg:pub.10.1007/s002650050515 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031269389
    188 https://doi.org/10.1007/s002650050515
    189 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    190 sg:pub.10.1007/s10592-008-9583-4 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002533526
    191 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10592-008-9583-4
    192 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    193 sg:pub.10.1007/s10592-013-0493-8 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1044815940
    194 https://doi.org/10.1007/s10592-013-0493-8
    195 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    196 sg:pub.10.1007/s11692-007-9009-0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1005235736
    197 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11692-007-9009-0
    198 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    199 sg:pub.10.1038/hdy.1948.21 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032768392
    200 https://doi.org/10.1038/hdy.1948.21
    201 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    202 sg:pub.10.1038/sj.hdy.6800103 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019875186
    203 https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.hdy.6800103
    204 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    205 grid-institutes:grid.1005.4 schema:alternateName Evolution & Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    206 schema:name Evolution & Ecology Research Centre, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    207 rdf:type schema:Organization
    208 grid-institutes:grid.1009.8 schema:alternateName School of Natural Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
    209 schema:name School of Natural Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia
    210 rdf:type schema:Organization
    211 grid-institutes:grid.1021.2 schema:alternateName School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia
    212 schema:name School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia
    213 rdf:type schema:Organization
    214 grid-institutes:grid.7872.a schema:alternateName School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
    215 schema:name School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
    216 rdf:type schema:Organization
     




    Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


    ...