A European cross-sectional survey to investigate how involved doctors training in clinical pharmacology are in drug concentration monitoring View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2022-04-14

AUTHORS

Thomas J. Green, Lauren E. Walker, Richard M. Turner

ABSTRACT

PurposeTherapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is widely recognised as a key attribute of clinical pharmacologists; yet, the extent to which physicians undertaking postgraduate training in clinical pharmacology (hereafter trainees) are involved in TDM is poorly characterised. Our own experience suggests wide variation in trainee exposure to TDM.MethodWe performed a Europe-wide cross-sectional internet-based survey of trainees to determine the nature and extent of trainee involvement in TDM.ResultsThere were 43 responses from eight countries analysed. Of the 21 respondents from the UK, all were also training in general internal medicine (GIM), while all of the respondents who were solely training in clinical pharmacology were from outside the UK. Overall, 86.0% of respondents reported access to drug monitoring for clinical care at their affiliated institution, of which 81.0% were personally involved in TDM in some capacity. On average, trainees reported that drug monitoring was available for 16 of the 33 (48%) of the drug/drug classes surveyed. UK-based respondents were involved in requesting drug-level investigations and interpreting the results for patients under their care in 76.2% and 85.7% of cases, respectively, while non-UK respondents supported other healthcare professionals to interpret results in 45.4% of cases. Trainees felt TDM training was generally either insufficient or very inadequate.ConclusionWhile access to TDM is relatively available at institutions where trainees are based, the role of trainees is variable and affected by a variety of factors including country and training programme. Universally, trainees feel they need more education in TDM. More... »

PAGES

1-9

References to SciGraph publications

  • 2013-05-10. Clinical Pharmacology in European health care—outcome of a questionnaire study in 31 countries in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
  • 2014-12-04. Clinical pharmacology in Russia—historical development and current state in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
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    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00228-022-03316-z

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    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00228-022-03316-z

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    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1147115724

    PUBMED

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/35426080


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