Feeding responses of the bivalves Crassostreagigas and Mytilustrossulus to chemical composition of fresh and aged kelp detritus View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2002-08

AUTHORS

J. Levinton, J. Ward, S. Shumway

ABSTRACT

The chemical composition of kelps (e.g. polyphenolics) deters grazing by herbivores, but kelp detritus is potentially a source of nutrition for suspension feeders. The effects of kelp detritus derived from two species [Agarumfimbriatum Harvey and Costariacostata (Turner) Saunders] on feeding of oysters, Crassostreagigas Thunberg, and mussels, Mytilustrossulus Gould, were examined in feeding experiments. Fresh and aged kelp particles were sequentially presented in combination with the microalga Rhodomonaslens at an initial total concentration of 5×10–4 ml–1. Aging of kelp particles for 4 days in seawater significantly reduced the concentration of polyphenolics without changing the total carbon or nitrogen content. Clearance rates of both mussels and oysters were significantly lower in the presence of fresh versus aged kelp particles, and clearance rates declined overall with declining polyphenolic concentrations. Video endoscopy was used to examine feeding selectivity at the level of the gill in oysters in the same food treatments used in the clearance rate experiments. Comparison of particle composition in the water versus the pseudofeces in both oysters and mussels was also used as a measure of feeding selectivity. When presented with R. lens in combination with fresh and aged kelp particles selectivity for R. lens tended to be greater against fresh than aged particles, and there was some indication that this was stronger for A. fimbriatum than for C. costata particles. The ability to select was lower at very high polyphenolic concentrations, which may reflect poisoning of sensory binding sites. These data suggest that bivalves distinguish among particles of varying chemical composition and respond by changing their clearance rates and their selectivity. More... »

PAGES

367-376

Journal

TITLE

Marine Biology

ISSUE

2

VOLUME

141

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00227-002-0830-9

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00227-002-0830-9

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1022309607


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