Rekonstruktive Aortenklappenchirurgie: Ross-, David- und Yacoub-Verfahren View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

2006-08

AUTHORS

J. F. Matthias Bechtel, Armin W. Erasmi, Martin Misfeld, Hans-H. Sievers

ABSTRACT

The aortic valve consists of three cusps attached to the wall of the aortic root. During the cardiac cycle, the aortic root undergoes complex movements that precede and aid opening and closing of the aortic valve. The aortic valve cusps themselves form thin-walled pocket-like structures, made from specialized tissue with fibrous, elastic, nervous, and muscular properties. The complex interactions of this tissue with the aortic root and within the cardiac cycle are only incompletely understood yet. In summary, the aortic valve is a complex structure which shows a perfect function in systole and diastole and under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. No valve prosthesis (so far) can keep up with the function of the native aortic valve. Therefore, surgical techniques have been invented that aim at sparing the aortic valve or replacing it with very similar autologous tissue. Besides the resulting (near) normal valve function, one appealing advantage of these techniques is that oral anticoagulation can be abandoned completely. If the valve cusps themselves are normal, but the aortic root is aneurysmatic or dissected (with or without resulting secondary aortic insufficiency), the aortic valve can be spared by resecting the aortic root tissue and replacing it by a vascular graft. The aortic valve can then be implanted into the vascular graft in a way described by David, or can be remodeled into it (Yacoub technique) - in this case, the graft first needs to be incised at its base so that the three commissures of the valve can be sewn into the three incisions. This way pseudosinuses within the vascular graft are created. The sinuses within the aortic root are considered important for aortic valve function and coronary perfusion. On the other hand, incisions at the base of the vascular graft harbor the potential for redilatation of the aortic root because of a missing circular fixation. Such a fixation is achieved by the David technique. Therefore, there is a great debate in the surgical community which valve-sparing technique is the best and numerous modifications of the original techniques exist. A clear clinical advantage of one technique over the other could not be demonstrated so far, but many authorities advise that the David technique is to be used preferentially in patients with Marfan's syndrome (or other connective tissue disorders) and those with a very wide basal aortic root. If the aortic valve cusps themselves are diseased and cannot be reconstructed, the autologous pulmonary valve is the most physiological substitute. Replacing the aortic valve with the autologous pulmonary valve is named Ross procedure. The defect in the right ventricular outflow tract that is created while harvesting the autograft must be reconstructed during the same procedure; usually, a pulmonary valve allograft is used for this purpose. With all reconstructive surgical techniques and with all autologous replacements there is a risk of reoperation, mainly (besides technical issues) because it is feared that leaving autologous tissue in place leads to recurrence of the original illness. The published results, however, with aortic valve-sparing surgery and with the Ross procedure show that the risk of reoperation appears to be very acceptable. This statement is especially true for the Ross procedure for which more and longer experience exists worldwide. Echocardiographic studies show that the aortic valve function after valve-sparing techniques and - especially - after the Ross procedure is indeed excellent. Therefore, patients with aortic root pathologies or aortic valve diseases should be informed about valve-sparing aortic root reconstructive techniques or the Ross procedure. The choice of technique should be made in close contact between patient, cardiologist, and cardiac surgeon. However, the described techniques require extensive experience within the surgical team. More... »

PAGES

413-422

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039072205

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16944060


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1102", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/11", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Medical and Health Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Aortic Aneurysm", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Aortic Valve", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Follow-Up Studies", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Heart Valve Diseases", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Humans", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Postoperative Complications", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Prosthesis Design", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Reoperation", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Sinus of Valsalva", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "inDefinedTermSet": "https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/", 
        "name": "Suture Techniques", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "name": [
            "Klinik f\u00fcr Herzchirurgie, Universit\u00e4tsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus L\u00fcbeck, L\u00fcbeck"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Bechtel", 
        "givenName": "J. F. Matthias", 
        "id": "sg:person.01173455537.93", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01173455537.93"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "name": [
            "Klinik f\u00fcr Herzchirurgie, Universit\u00e4tsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus L\u00fcbeck, L\u00fcbeck"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Erasmi", 
        "givenName": "Armin W.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0665225277.02", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0665225277.02"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "name": [
            "Klinik f\u00fcr Herzchirurgie, Universit\u00e4tsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus L\u00fcbeck, L\u00fcbeck"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Misfeld", 
        "givenName": "Martin", 
        "id": "sg:person.01344167770.56", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01344167770.56"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "name": [
            "Klinik f\u00fcr Herzchirurgie, Universit\u00e4tsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus L\u00fcbeck, L\u00fcbeck", 
            "Klinik f\u00fcr Herzchirurgie,\nUniversit\u00e4tsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus L\u00fcbeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, L\u00fcbeck"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Sievers", 
        "givenName": "Hans-H.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01163467044.11", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01163467044.11"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2006-08", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2006-08-01", 
    "description": "The aortic valve consists of three cusps attached to the wall of the aortic root. During the cardiac cycle, the aortic root undergoes complex movements that precede and aid opening and closing of the aortic valve. The aortic valve cusps themselves form thin-walled pocket-like structures, made from specialized tissue with fibrous, elastic, nervous, and muscular properties. The complex interactions of this tissue with the aortic root and within the cardiac cycle are only incompletely understood yet. In summary, the aortic valve is a complex structure which shows a perfect function in systole and diastole and under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. No valve prosthesis (so far) can keep up with the function of the native aortic valve. Therefore, surgical techniques have been invented that aim at sparing the aortic valve or replacing it with very similar autologous tissue. Besides the resulting (near) normal valve function, one appealing advantage of these techniques is that oral anticoagulation can be abandoned completely. If the valve cusps themselves are normal, but the aortic root is aneurysmatic or dissected (with or without resulting secondary aortic insufficiency), the aortic valve can be spared by resecting the aortic root tissue and replacing it by a vascular graft. The aortic valve can then be implanted into the vascular graft in a way described by David, or can be remodeled into it (Yacoub technique) - in this case, the graft first needs to be incised at its base so that the three commissures of the valve can be sewn into the three incisions. This way pseudosinuses within the vascular graft are created. The sinuses within the aortic root are considered important for aortic valve function and coronary perfusion. On the other hand, incisions at the base of the vascular graft harbor the potential for redilatation of the aortic root because of a missing circular fixation. Such a fixation is achieved by the David technique. Therefore, there is a great debate in the surgical community which valve-sparing technique is the best and numerous modifications of the original techniques exist. A clear clinical advantage of one technique over the other could not be demonstrated so far, but many authorities advise that the David technique is to be used preferentially in patients with Marfan's syndrome (or other connective tissue disorders) and those with a very wide basal aortic root. If the aortic valve cusps themselves are diseased and cannot be reconstructed, the autologous pulmonary valve is the most physiological substitute. Replacing the aortic valve with the autologous pulmonary valve is named Ross procedure. The defect in the right ventricular outflow tract that is created while harvesting the autograft must be reconstructed during the same procedure; usually, a pulmonary valve allograft is used for this purpose. With all reconstructive surgical techniques and with all autologous replacements there is a risk of reoperation, mainly (besides technical issues) because it is feared that leaving autologous tissue in place leads to recurrence of the original illness. The published results, however, with aortic valve-sparing surgery and with the Ross procedure show that the risk of reoperation appears to be very acceptable. This statement is especially true for the Ross procedure for which more and longer experience exists worldwide. Echocardiographic studies show that the aortic valve function after valve-sparing techniques and - especially - after the Ross procedure is indeed excellent. Therefore, patients with aortic root pathologies or aortic valve diseases should be informed about valve-sparing aortic root reconstructive techniques or the Ross procedure. The choice of technique should be made in close contact between patient, cardiologist, and cardiac surgeon. However, the described techniques require extensive experience within the surgical team.", 
    "genre": "research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "de"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1087175", 
        "issn": [
          "0340-9937", 
          "1615-6692"
        ], 
        "name": "Herz", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "5", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "31"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "Rekonstruktive Aortenklappenchirurgie: Ross-, David- und Yacoub-Verfahren", 
    "pagination": "413-422", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "ba1ecaecb41db052b484a9819d712b0249433223fe5a62913d554548a3869f81"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "pubmed_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "16944060"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nlm_unique_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "7801231"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1039072205"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039072205"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-10T14:53", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000001_0000000264/records_8663_00000482.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

144 TRIPLES      20 PREDICATES      41 URIs      33 LITERALS      21 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4 schema:about N20393252b08d47309770f4bbba6902c1
2 N430ad445e48b427a9e09c0866d20e4d4
3 N4d8d0e8ccd574572aa4c2bd5950f5e0a
4 N528867aba4df47eb92407c65145879e5
5 N5334afcc433642a78ff680628f5dd87e
6 N721c7d1d5eb146fdb4bbc2c10e9747d2
7 N80c93006b2524035ad964c4604c131d4
8 N9573fa447cad47068766f3062e2656ae
9 N96ccb30a24124322abacda2b60e27baa
10 N9e81b74160264483afd10b4c5702899e
11 Nad9b66656d914407a3839b00b2c5005e
12 Nbbe4edf4834c4e1087039a2ac58c2944
13 anzsrc-for:11
14 anzsrc-for:1102
15 schema:author N2edf4509420c4cf8975efb3ba4772f82
16 schema:datePublished 2006-08
17 schema:datePublishedReg 2006-08-01
18 schema:description The aortic valve consists of three cusps attached to the wall of the aortic root. During the cardiac cycle, the aortic root undergoes complex movements that precede and aid opening and closing of the aortic valve. The aortic valve cusps themselves form thin-walled pocket-like structures, made from specialized tissue with fibrous, elastic, nervous, and muscular properties. The complex interactions of this tissue with the aortic root and within the cardiac cycle are only incompletely understood yet. In summary, the aortic valve is a complex structure which shows a perfect function in systole and diastole and under a wide range of hemodynamic conditions. No valve prosthesis (so far) can keep up with the function of the native aortic valve. Therefore, surgical techniques have been invented that aim at sparing the aortic valve or replacing it with very similar autologous tissue. Besides the resulting (near) normal valve function, one appealing advantage of these techniques is that oral anticoagulation can be abandoned completely. If the valve cusps themselves are normal, but the aortic root is aneurysmatic or dissected (with or without resulting secondary aortic insufficiency), the aortic valve can be spared by resecting the aortic root tissue and replacing it by a vascular graft. The aortic valve can then be implanted into the vascular graft in a way described by David, or can be remodeled into it (Yacoub technique) - in this case, the graft first needs to be incised at its base so that the three commissures of the valve can be sewn into the three incisions. This way pseudosinuses within the vascular graft are created. The sinuses within the aortic root are considered important for aortic valve function and coronary perfusion. On the other hand, incisions at the base of the vascular graft harbor the potential for redilatation of the aortic root because of a missing circular fixation. Such a fixation is achieved by the David technique. Therefore, there is a great debate in the surgical community which valve-sparing technique is the best and numerous modifications of the original techniques exist. A clear clinical advantage of one technique over the other could not be demonstrated so far, but many authorities advise that the David technique is to be used preferentially in patients with Marfan's syndrome (or other connective tissue disorders) and those with a very wide basal aortic root. If the aortic valve cusps themselves are diseased and cannot be reconstructed, the autologous pulmonary valve is the most physiological substitute. Replacing the aortic valve with the autologous pulmonary valve is named Ross procedure. The defect in the right ventricular outflow tract that is created while harvesting the autograft must be reconstructed during the same procedure; usually, a pulmonary valve allograft is used for this purpose. With all reconstructive surgical techniques and with all autologous replacements there is a risk of reoperation, mainly (besides technical issues) because it is feared that leaving autologous tissue in place leads to recurrence of the original illness. The published results, however, with aortic valve-sparing surgery and with the Ross procedure show that the risk of reoperation appears to be very acceptable. This statement is especially true for the Ross procedure for which more and longer experience exists worldwide. Echocardiographic studies show that the aortic valve function after valve-sparing techniques and - especially - after the Ross procedure is indeed excellent. Therefore, patients with aortic root pathologies or aortic valve diseases should be informed about valve-sparing aortic root reconstructive techniques or the Ross procedure. The choice of technique should be made in close contact between patient, cardiologist, and cardiac surgeon. However, the described techniques require extensive experience within the surgical team.
19 schema:genre research_article
20 schema:inLanguage de
21 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
22 schema:isPartOf N10dcb2cbe02b4d61b502842aaa0cd504
23 N3b14d777a21d4570a1925f6f81963e6d
24 sg:journal.1087175
25 schema:name Rekonstruktive Aortenklappenchirurgie: Ross-, David- und Yacoub-Verfahren
26 schema:pagination 413-422
27 schema:productId N05f1f832acab478ea0eec8d20048446e
28 N0f08cfe9cbfa437bbe57b3d118af6e95
29 N14b8d9356f8a4b98a8fd665ebe506aee
30 N688b2eec01364da59ba5ad6c4be64f84
31 Nbb9b831946eb45c8a8ad22e98b918b44
32 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1039072205
33 https://doi.org/10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4
34 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-10T14:53
35 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
36 schema:sdPublisher N34157b19ce9b45db8b54daf1cdb3c1ae
37 schema:url http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4
38 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
39 sgo:sdDataset articles
40 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
41 N05f1f832acab478ea0eec8d20048446e schema:name doi
42 schema:value 10.1007/s00059-006-2836-4
43 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
44 N0f08cfe9cbfa437bbe57b3d118af6e95 schema:name dimensions_id
45 schema:value pub.1039072205
46 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
47 N10dcb2cbe02b4d61b502842aaa0cd504 schema:volumeNumber 31
48 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
49 N14b8d9356f8a4b98a8fd665ebe506aee schema:name nlm_unique_id
50 schema:value 7801231
51 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
52 N20393252b08d47309770f4bbba6902c1 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
53 schema:name Suture Techniques
54 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
55 N2edf4509420c4cf8975efb3ba4772f82 rdf:first sg:person.01173455537.93
56 rdf:rest Nb6b10cc85e874e1990e024c0b6f9296f
57 N34157b19ce9b45db8b54daf1cdb3c1ae schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
58 rdf:type schema:Organization
59 N3b14d777a21d4570a1925f6f81963e6d schema:issueNumber 5
60 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
61 N430ad445e48b427a9e09c0866d20e4d4 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
62 schema:name Humans
63 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
64 N45a5f23e5f0d455ea8972638f2cc1808 schema:name Klinik für Herzchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Lübeck
65 Klinik für Herzchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck
66 rdf:type schema:Organization
67 N4d8d0e8ccd574572aa4c2bd5950f5e0a schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
68 schema:name Postoperative Complications
69 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
70 N528867aba4df47eb92407c65145879e5 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
71 schema:name Follow-Up Studies
72 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
73 N5334afcc433642a78ff680628f5dd87e schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
74 schema:name Reoperation
75 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
76 N688b2eec01364da59ba5ad6c4be64f84 schema:name pubmed_id
77 schema:value 16944060
78 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
79 N721c7d1d5eb146fdb4bbc2c10e9747d2 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
80 schema:name Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation
81 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
82 N7e47f06a3058405bba10cb03910b5f0e rdf:first sg:person.01344167770.56
83 rdf:rest N9c38c34926bd4e60a280a8f7faaf783d
84 N80c93006b2524035ad964c4604c131d4 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
85 schema:name Prosthesis Design
86 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
87 N82e34385c6ba4d5f97c3586bd05cf0a6 schema:name Klinik für Herzchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck
88 rdf:type schema:Organization
89 N9573fa447cad47068766f3062e2656ae schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
90 schema:name Aortic Valve
91 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
92 N96ccb30a24124322abacda2b60e27baa schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
93 schema:name Heart Valve Diseases
94 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
95 N96e76dcdcb0d47dd80d47de4d9128cae schema:name Klinik für Herzchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck
96 rdf:type schema:Organization
97 N9c38c34926bd4e60a280a8f7faaf783d rdf:first sg:person.01163467044.11
98 rdf:rest rdf:nil
99 N9e81b74160264483afd10b4c5702899e schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
100 schema:name Aortic Aneurysm
101 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
102 Nacc735872f21492fbbc8e09a4e43b5c5 schema:name Klinik für Herzchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck
103 rdf:type schema:Organization
104 Nad9b66656d914407a3839b00b2c5005e schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
105 schema:name Sinus of Valsalva
106 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
107 Nb6b10cc85e874e1990e024c0b6f9296f rdf:first sg:person.0665225277.02
108 rdf:rest N7e47f06a3058405bba10cb03910b5f0e
109 Nbb9b831946eb45c8a8ad22e98b918b44 schema:name readcube_id
110 schema:value ba1ecaecb41db052b484a9819d712b0249433223fe5a62913d554548a3869f81
111 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
112 Nbbe4edf4834c4e1087039a2ac58c2944 schema:inDefinedTermSet https://www.nlm.nih.gov/mesh/
113 schema:name Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation
114 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
115 anzsrc-for:11 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
116 schema:name Medical and Health Sciences
117 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
118 anzsrc-for:1102 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
119 schema:name Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology
120 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
121 sg:journal.1087175 schema:issn 0340-9937
122 1615-6692
123 schema:name Herz
124 rdf:type schema:Periodical
125 sg:person.01163467044.11 schema:affiliation N45a5f23e5f0d455ea8972638f2cc1808
126 schema:familyName Sievers
127 schema:givenName Hans-H.
128 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01163467044.11
129 rdf:type schema:Person
130 sg:person.01173455537.93 schema:affiliation N82e34385c6ba4d5f97c3586bd05cf0a6
131 schema:familyName Bechtel
132 schema:givenName J. F. Matthias
133 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01173455537.93
134 rdf:type schema:Person
135 sg:person.01344167770.56 schema:affiliation N96e76dcdcb0d47dd80d47de4d9128cae
136 schema:familyName Misfeld
137 schema:givenName Martin
138 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01344167770.56
139 rdf:type schema:Person
140 sg:person.0665225277.02 schema:affiliation Nacc735872f21492fbbc8e09a4e43b5c5
141 schema:familyName Erasmi
142 schema:givenName Armin W.
143 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0665225277.02
144 rdf:type schema:Person
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...