Thermal imaging reveals massive heat accumulation in flowers across a broad spectrum of alpine taxa View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

2014-01-28

AUTHORS

Lars Dietrich, Christian Körner

ABSTRACT

By their small size, alpine plants escape free atmospheric convection and operate in a warm canopy climate depending on exposure and solar radiation. Inflorescences commonly protrude from that aerodynamically sheltered microenvironment and, thus, can be expected to experience a comparatively cooler climate. Using a high-resolution thermal camera, we performed a mid-summer field survey in the Swiss Alps at 300 m above the climatic treeline to examine floral temperatures as related to solar radiation and flower diameter, height, brightness of flowering units and their area density across a sample of 43 alpine species. We show that flowers of alpine species are actually warmer (mostly 3 K) rather than cooler than canopy foliage on bright days. The degree of heating largely depends on solar radiation, with flowering unit diameter and their area density as significant co-factors. Only in cushion plants, we found flowers to be slightly cooler than the compact leaf canopy. Abrupt shading of flowers revealed the dynamics of heat loss, with two-thirds of the extra heat lost in about 2–3 min. The study evidences that the size and shape of alpine flowers overcompensate the expected negative effects of greater wind exposure on experienced temperature as long as the sun is out. The thermal conditions for floral processes are, thus, not much different from lower elevation conditions during good weather. The remaining reproductive constraints are related to the duration of such favourable periods and season length in general. More... »

PAGES

27-35

References to SciGraph publications

  • 1976-09. Energie- und Wasserhaushalt eines alpinen Zwergstrauchbestandes während einer Föhnperiode in THEORETICAL AND APPLIED CLIMATOLOGY
  • 2011-09-12. From the Flower Bud to the Mature Seed: Timing and Dynamics of Flower and Seed Development in High-Mountain Plants in PLANTS IN ALPINE REGIONS
  • 2011-09-12. Bioclimatic Temperatures in the High Alps in PLANTS IN ALPINE REGIONS
  • 1982-01. Effects of heliotropic movements of flowers of Dryas octopetala L. on gynoecium temperature and seed development in OECOLOGIA
  • 2012-11-04. Multifunctional bracts enhance plant fitness during flowering and seed development in Rheum nobile (Polygonaceae), a giant herb endemic to the high Himalayas in OECOLOGIA
  • 2002-06-18. Thermal insulation and accumulation of heat in the downy inflorescences of Saussurea medusa (Asteraceae) at high elevation in Yunnan, China in JOURNAL OF PLANT RESEARCH
  • 1989-03. Consequences of flower heliotropism for reproduction in an alpine buttercup (Ranunculus adoneus) in OECOLOGIA
  • 2003. Alpine Plant Life, Functional Plant Ecology of High Mountain Ecosystems in NONE
  • 2006-02-08. Solar furnaces or swamp coolers: costs and benefits of water use by solar-tracking flowers of the alpine snow buttercup, Ranunculus adoneus in OECOLOGIA
  • 2009-05-12. Elevational trends of biodiversity and plant traits do not converge—a test in the Helan Range, NW China in PLANT ECOLOGY
  • 2010-03-05. Flower heliotropism of Anemone rivularis (Ranunculaceae) in the Himalayas: effects on floral temperature and reproductive fitness in PLANT ECOLOGY
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00035-014-0123-1

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00035-014-0123-1

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032721401


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