Reduced fitness at early life stages in peripheral versus core populations of Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra) is not reflected ... View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

2012-08-18

AUTHORS

Kristina Salzer, Felix Gugerli

ABSTRACT

Small and fragmented populations are prone to mating among related individuals, increasing homozygosity and likely negatively affecting offspring fitness. Such a trend may be enforced by environmental changes in species with narrow ecological niches because inbred populations are more prone to become maladapted as compared to outcrossed populations. Here, we studied differences in offspring fitness and inbreeding levels between core and peripheral populations of Swiss stone pine (Pinus cembra). We collected open-pollinated progenies of P. cembra in large, contiguous and in small, isolated populations (core vs. periphery). Seeds were germinated and grown in a common garden to test for differences in fitness parameters, whereas subsamples of seed lots were genotyped at seven nuclear microsatellites to calculate selfing rates. We found significantly lower seed production, higher embryo abortion rates and lower germination success in small peripheral compared to large core populations of P. cembra. In contrast, winter survival and first-year growth of seedlings did not significantly differ between the two population types. These results indicate higher inbreeding depression at the earliest life stages in small and fragmented populations compared to populations from the contiguous range of P. cembra. However, we found no correlation between any fitness parameters and progeny-derived selfing rates. We explain this discrepancy by the fact that inbreeding depression mostly affects embryo abortion rates in Pinaceae. This cannot be genetically quantified because non-developed embryos cannot be genotyped. We infer that population fragmentation in the long term negatively affects natural regeneration in this long-lived, wind-pollinated conifer species. More... »

PAGES

75-85

References to SciGraph publications

  • 2006-10. Dynamics of allozyme heterozygosity in Siberian dwarf pine Pinus pumila (Pall.) Regel populations of the Russian Far East: Comparison of embryos and maternal plants in RUSSIAN JOURNAL OF GENETICS
  • 2005-08-03. Inbreeding depression in benign and stressful environments in HEREDITY
  • 1999-04-01. Factors influencing the extent of inbreeding depression: an example from Scots pine in HEREDITY
  • 2002-04-02. Extensions of models for the estimation of mating systems using n independent loci in HEREDITY
  • 1999-03. Why do plants abort so many developing seeds: bad offspring or bad maternal genotypes? in EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY
  • 1993-08. The degree of early inbreeding depression determines the selfing rate at the seed stage: model and results from Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) in HEREDITY
  • 2005-11. Allozyme Polymorphism of Swiss Stone Pine Pinus cembra L. in Mountain Populations of the Alps and the Eastern Carpathians in RUSSIAN JOURNAL OF GENETICS
  • 1991-08. Effects of a change in the level of inbreeding on the genetic load in NATURE
  • 1993-06. Selection against inbreds in early life-cycle phases in Pinus leucodermis Ant. in HEREDITY
  • 1992-10. Estimating numbers of embryonic lethals in conifers in HEREDITY
  • 2009-07-09. Gradual decline in genetic diversity in Swiss stone pine populations (Pinus cembra) across Switzerland suggests postglacial re-colonization into the Alps from a common eastern glacial refugium in ALPINE BOTANY
  • 2006-08-16. Impacts of forest fragmentation on the mating system and genetic diversity of white spruce (Picea glauca) at the landscape level in HEREDITY
  • 2007-02-23. Mating system and inbreeding depression in whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis Engelm.) in TREE GENETICS & GENOMES
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    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/s00035-012-0106-z

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00035-012-0106-z

    DIMENSIONS

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