Applied behavior analysis and the movement to restructure schools: Compatibilities and opportunities for collaboration View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1992-12

AUTHORS

Frank W. Kohler, Phillip S. Strain

ABSTRACT

The field of applied behavior analysis has devoted considerable effort to the problem of educating America's youth. In addition to developing a wide range of procedures to improve children's academic and classroom survival skills, behavioral researchers have discussed a wide range of technological characteristics that are likely to facilitate the adoption of their procedures by educational decision-makers and practitioners. A movement to restructure American schools has become highly popularized within educational, political, and public media forums over the past several years. One general characteristic of this movement is its failure to recommend the more frequent implementation of applied behavior analysis techniques to educate America's youth. A close inspection of three global models for school reform, however, reveals notable compatibilities with the focus and goals of applied behavior analysis. Applied behavior analysts can collaborate with and contribute to the school restructuring movement by pursuing the more formal and systematic analyses of characteristics essential to the adoption process. More... »

PAGES

367-390

References to SciGraph publications

  • 1991-09. The problem: American education the solution: Use behavior analytic technology in JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL EDUCATION
  • 1991-09. The relationship variable in behavioral consultation in JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL EDUCATION
  • 1979-09. Behavioral Assessment of Human Preference in PERSPECTIVES ON BEHAVIOR SCIENCE
  • 1991-09. Behavior analysis and education: An unfulfilled dream in JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL EDUCATION
  • 1991-09. Change schools through revolution, not evolution in JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL EDUCATION
  • 1981. Children as Instructional Agents for Handicapped Peers in THE UTILIZATION OF CLASSROOM PEERS AS BEHAVIOR CHANGE AGENTS
  • 1991-09. Is the three-term contingency trial a predictor of effective instruction? in JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL EDUCATION
  • 1991-10-01. The Teacher as Strategic Scientist: A Solution to Our Educational Crisis? in BEHAVIOR AND SOCIAL ISSUES
  • 1991-06. Teaching practices to save America's schools: The legacy of B. F. Skinner in JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL EDUCATION
  • 1981. Peer Tutoring in Academic Settings in THE UTILIZATION OF CLASSROOM PEERS AS BEHAVIOR CHANGE AGENTS
  • 1986. Performance-Based Assessment of Depriving Environments: Comparison of Context/Response Interactions Within Inner-City and Suburban School Settings in HUMAN ASSESSMENT: COGNITION AND MOTIVATION
  • 1991-06. Direct instruction: What it is and what it is becoming in JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL EDUCATION
  • 1991-04. The Right to Effective Education in PERSPECTIVES ON BEHAVIOR SCIENCE
  • 1981. Peer-Oriented Behavioral Technology and Ethical Issues in THE UTILIZATION OF CLASSROOM PEERS AS BEHAVIOR CHANGE AGENTS
  • 1991-09. Marketing measurably effective instructional methods in JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL EDUCATION
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00952355

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00952355

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1048868194


    Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
    Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

    JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

    TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

    [
      {
        "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
        "about": [
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/13", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Education", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1303", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Specialist Studies In Education", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }
        ], 
        "author": [
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Reseach Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/None", 
              "name": [
                "Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Reseach Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Kohler", 
            "givenName": "Frank W.", 
            "id": "sg:person.01143132370.57", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01143132370.57"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }, 
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.280673.8", 
              "name": [
                "Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Strain", 
            "givenName": "Phillip S.", 
            "id": "sg:person.015716135147.34", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.015716135147.34"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }
        ], 
        "citation": [
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00957004", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049078436", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00957004"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_9", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1026241414", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_9"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf03392556", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1078543356", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf03392556"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947188", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1000358723", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947188"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00957002", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1029320167", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00957002"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947182", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002347313", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947182"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947185", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047542464", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947185"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947186", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019867638", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947186"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_6", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036912023", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_6"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947187", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001950058", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947187"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-94-009-4406-0_41", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028020302", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-4406-0_41"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_10", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001034521", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_10"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf03391837", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1078543552", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf03391837"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947184", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1042083566", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947184"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.5210/bsi.v1i2.165", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1072708885", 
              "https://doi.org/10.5210/bsi.v1i2.165"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }
        ], 
        "datePublished": "1992-12", 
        "datePublishedReg": "1992-12-01", 
        "description": "The field of applied behavior analysis has devoted considerable effort to the problem of educating America's youth. In addition to developing a wide range of procedures to improve children's academic and classroom survival skills, behavioral researchers have discussed a wide range of technological characteristics that are likely to facilitate the adoption of their procedures by educational decision-makers and practitioners. A movement to restructure American schools has become highly popularized within educational, political, and public media forums over the past several years. One general characteristic of this movement is its failure to recommend the more frequent implementation of applied behavior analysis techniques to educate America's youth. A close inspection of three global models for school reform, however, reveals notable compatibilities with the focus and goals of applied behavior analysis. Applied behavior analysts can collaborate with and contribute to the school restructuring movement by pursuing the more formal and systematic analyses of characteristics essential to the adoption process.", 
        "genre": "article", 
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00952355", 
        "inLanguage": "en", 
        "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
        "isPartOf": [
          {
            "id": "sg:journal.1130228", 
            "issn": [
              "1053-0819", 
              "1573-3513"
            ], 
            "name": "Journal of Behavioral Education", 
            "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
            "type": "Periodical"
          }, 
          {
            "issueNumber": "4", 
            "type": "PublicationIssue"
          }, 
          {
            "type": "PublicationVolume", 
            "volumeNumber": "2"
          }
        ], 
        "keywords": [
          "applied behavior analysis", 
          "America's youth", 
          "applied behavior analysis techniques", 
          "school restructuring movement", 
          "classroom survival skills", 
          "school reform", 
          "restructuring movement", 
          "American schools", 
          "behavior analysis techniques", 
          "survival skills", 
          "media forums", 
          "applied behavior analysts", 
          "frequent implementation", 
          "behavior analysis", 
          "schools", 
          "youth", 
          "behavior analysts", 
          "skills", 
          "reform", 
          "adoption process", 
          "collaboration", 
          "forum", 
          "opportunities", 
          "analysis techniques", 
          "researchers", 
          "general characteristics", 
          "practitioners", 
          "children", 
          "goal", 
          "implementation", 
          "focus", 
          "adoption", 
          "efforts", 
          "systematic analysis", 
          "considerable effort", 
          "wide range", 
          "analysis", 
          "behavioral researchers", 
          "process", 
          "years", 
          "problem", 
          "movement", 
          "technological characteristics", 
          "characteristics", 
          "closer inspection", 
          "field", 
          "model", 
          "procedure", 
          "addition", 
          "range", 
          "analysts", 
          "inspection", 
          "compatibility", 
          "failure", 
          "technique", 
          "global model", 
          "public media forums", 
          "notable compatibilities"
        ], 
        "name": "Applied behavior analysis and the movement to restructure schools: Compatibilities and opportunities for collaboration", 
        "pagination": "367-390", 
        "productId": [
          {
            "name": "dimensions_id", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "pub.1048868194"
            ]
          }, 
          {
            "name": "doi", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "10.1007/bf00952355"
            ]
          }
        ], 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00952355", 
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1048868194"
        ], 
        "sdDataset": "articles", 
        "sdDatePublished": "2021-11-01T17:59", 
        "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
        "sdPublisher": {
          "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20211101/entities/gbq_results/article/article_232.jsonl", 
        "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
        "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00952355"
      }
    ]
     

    Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

    HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

    JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00952355'

    N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00952355'

    Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

    curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00952355'

    RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00952355'


     

    This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

    186 TRIPLES      22 PREDICATES      99 URIs      76 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00952355 schema:about anzsrc-for:13
    2 anzsrc-for:1303
    3 schema:author Nc13f66e2a96d4f47ba505e5883ebaf6e
    4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_10
    5 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_6
    6 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_9
    7 sg:pub.10.1007/978-94-009-4406-0_41
    8 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947182
    9 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947184
    10 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947185
    11 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947186
    12 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947187
    13 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947188
    14 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00957002
    15 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00957004
    16 sg:pub.10.1007/bf03391837
    17 sg:pub.10.1007/bf03392556
    18 sg:pub.10.5210/bsi.v1i2.165
    19 schema:datePublished 1992-12
    20 schema:datePublishedReg 1992-12-01
    21 schema:description The field of applied behavior analysis has devoted considerable effort to the problem of educating America's youth. In addition to developing a wide range of procedures to improve children's academic and classroom survival skills, behavioral researchers have discussed a wide range of technological characteristics that are likely to facilitate the adoption of their procedures by educational decision-makers and practitioners. A movement to restructure American schools has become highly popularized within educational, political, and public media forums over the past several years. One general characteristic of this movement is its failure to recommend the more frequent implementation of applied behavior analysis techniques to educate America's youth. A close inspection of three global models for school reform, however, reveals notable compatibilities with the focus and goals of applied behavior analysis. Applied behavior analysts can collaborate with and contribute to the school restructuring movement by pursuing the more formal and systematic analyses of characteristics essential to the adoption process.
    22 schema:genre article
    23 schema:inLanguage en
    24 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
    25 schema:isPartOf N19a5df27bad2456c813f2ec2af93827f
    26 N45b033c0f803438c91d83f933d7f1487
    27 sg:journal.1130228
    28 schema:keywords America's youth
    29 American schools
    30 addition
    31 adoption
    32 adoption process
    33 analysis
    34 analysis techniques
    35 analysts
    36 applied behavior analysis
    37 applied behavior analysis techniques
    38 applied behavior analysts
    39 behavior analysis
    40 behavior analysis techniques
    41 behavior analysts
    42 behavioral researchers
    43 characteristics
    44 children
    45 classroom survival skills
    46 closer inspection
    47 collaboration
    48 compatibility
    49 considerable effort
    50 efforts
    51 failure
    52 field
    53 focus
    54 forum
    55 frequent implementation
    56 general characteristics
    57 global model
    58 goal
    59 implementation
    60 inspection
    61 media forums
    62 model
    63 movement
    64 notable compatibilities
    65 opportunities
    66 practitioners
    67 problem
    68 procedure
    69 process
    70 public media forums
    71 range
    72 reform
    73 researchers
    74 restructuring movement
    75 school reform
    76 school restructuring movement
    77 schools
    78 skills
    79 survival skills
    80 systematic analysis
    81 technique
    82 technological characteristics
    83 wide range
    84 years
    85 youth
    86 schema:name Applied behavior analysis and the movement to restructure schools: Compatibilities and opportunities for collaboration
    87 schema:pagination 367-390
    88 schema:productId N1744b5f2871746c1846b63921a4e3a11
    89 N8230b27f33fb46e3b834a3e369c52566
    90 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1048868194
    91 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00952355
    92 schema:sdDatePublished 2021-11-01T17:59
    93 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    94 schema:sdPublisher N950c60a70db8436b8c1f4a48815e14cc
    95 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00952355
    96 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
    97 sgo:sdDataset articles
    98 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
    99 N01ba70462aba4aa386e043907b9ffdee rdf:first sg:person.015716135147.34
    100 rdf:rest rdf:nil
    101 N1744b5f2871746c1846b63921a4e3a11 schema:name doi
    102 schema:value 10.1007/bf00952355
    103 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    104 N19a5df27bad2456c813f2ec2af93827f schema:issueNumber 4
    105 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
    106 N45b033c0f803438c91d83f933d7f1487 schema:volumeNumber 2
    107 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
    108 N8230b27f33fb46e3b834a3e369c52566 schema:name dimensions_id
    109 schema:value pub.1048868194
    110 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    111 N950c60a70db8436b8c1f4a48815e14cc schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
    112 rdf:type schema:Organization
    113 Nc13f66e2a96d4f47ba505e5883ebaf6e rdf:first sg:person.01143132370.57
    114 rdf:rest N01ba70462aba4aa386e043907b9ffdee
    115 anzsrc-for:13 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    116 schema:name Education
    117 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    118 anzsrc-for:1303 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    119 schema:name Specialist Studies In Education
    120 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    121 sg:journal.1130228 schema:issn 1053-0819
    122 1573-3513
    123 schema:name Journal of Behavioral Education
    124 schema:publisher Springer Nature
    125 rdf:type schema:Periodical
    126 sg:person.01143132370.57 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:None
    127 schema:familyName Kohler
    128 schema:givenName Frank W.
    129 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01143132370.57
    130 rdf:type schema:Person
    131 sg:person.015716135147.34 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.280673.8
    132 schema:familyName Strain
    133 schema:givenName Phillip S.
    134 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.015716135147.34
    135 rdf:type schema:Person
    136 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_10 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001034521
    137 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_10
    138 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    139 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_6 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036912023
    140 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_6
    141 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    142 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_9 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1026241414
    143 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2180-2_9
    144 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    145 sg:pub.10.1007/978-94-009-4406-0_41 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1028020302
    146 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-4406-0_41
    147 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    148 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947182 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002347313
    149 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947182
    150 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    151 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947184 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1042083566
    152 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947184
    153 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    154 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947185 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1047542464
    155 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947185
    156 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    157 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947186 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019867638
    158 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947186
    159 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    160 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947187 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001950058
    161 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947187
    162 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    163 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00947188 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1000358723
    164 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00947188
    165 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    166 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00957002 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1029320167
    167 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00957002
    168 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    169 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00957004 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049078436
    170 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00957004
    171 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    172 sg:pub.10.1007/bf03391837 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1078543552
    173 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf03391837
    174 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    175 sg:pub.10.1007/bf03392556 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1078543356
    176 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf03392556
    177 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    178 sg:pub.10.5210/bsi.v1i2.165 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1072708885
    179 https://doi.org/10.5210/bsi.v1i2.165
    180 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    181 grid-institutes:None schema:alternateName Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Reseach Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    182 schema:name Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Reseach Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    183 rdf:type schema:Organization
    184 grid-institutes:grid.280673.8 schema:alternateName Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    185 schema:name Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    186 rdf:type schema:Organization
     




    Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


    ...