Field survey report on tsunami disasters caused by the 1993 Southwest Hokkaido earthquake View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1995-09

AUTHORS

Toshihiko Shimamoto, Akito Tsutsumi, Eiko Kawamoto, Masahiro Miyawaki, Hiroshi Sato

ABSTRACT

Detailed field work at Okushiri Island and along the southwest coast of Hokkaido has revealed quantitatively (1) the advancing direction of tsunami on land, (2) the true tsunami height (i.e., height of tsunami, excluding its splashes, as measured from the ground) and (3) the flow velocity of tsunami on land, in heavily damaged areas. When a Japanese wooden house is swept away by tsunami, bolts that tie the house to its concrete foundation resist until the last moment and become bent towards the direction of the house being carried away. The orientations of more than 850 of those bent bolts and iron pipes (all that can be measured, mostly at Okushiri Island) and fell-down direction of about 400 trees clearly display how tsunami behaved on land and caused serious damage at various places. The true tsunami height was estimated by using several indicators, such as broken tree twigs and a window pane. The flow velocity of tsunami on land was determined by estimating the hydrodynamic force exerted on a bent handrail and a bent-down guardrail by the tsunami throughin situ strength tests. Contrary to the wide-spread recognition after the tsunami hazard, our results clearly indicate that only a few residential areas (i.e., Monai, eastern Hamatsumae, and a small portion at northern Aonae, all on Okushiri Island) were hit by a huge tsunami, with true heights reaching 10 m. Southern Aonae was completely swept away by tsunami that came directly from the focal region immediately to the west. The true tsunami height over the western sea wall of southern Aonae was estimated as 3 to 4 m. Northern Aonae also suffered severe damage due to tsunami that invaded from the corner zone of the sand dune (8 m high) and tide embankment at the northern end of the Aonae Harbor. This corner apparently acted as a tsunami amplifier, and tide embankment or breakwater can be quite dangerous when tsunami advances towards the corner it makes with the coast. The nearly complete devastation of Inaho at the northern end of Okushiri Island underscored the danger of tsunami whose propagation direction is parallel to the coast, since such tsunami waves tend to be amplified and tide embankment or breakwater is constructed low towards the coast at many harbors or fishing ports. Tsunami waves mostly of 2 to 4 m in true height swept away Hamatsumae on the southeast site of Okushiri Island where there were no coastal structures. Coastal structures were effective in reducing tsunami hazard at many sites. The maximum flow velocity at northern Aonae was estimated as 10 to 18 m/s (Tsutsumiet al., 1994), and such a high on-land velocity of tsunami near shore is probably due to the rapid shallowing of the deep sea near the epicentral region towards Okushiri Island. If the advancing direction, true height, and flow velocity of tsunami can be predicted by future analyses of tsunami generation and progagation, the analyses will be a powerful tool for future assessment of tsunami disasters, including the identification of blind spots in the tsunami hazard reduction. More... »

PAGES

665-691

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00874389

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00874389

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030151352


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0406", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/04", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Earth Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of Tokyo", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d", 
          "name": [
            "Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113, Tokyo, Japan"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Shimamoto", 
        "givenName": "Toshihiko", 
        "id": "sg:person.013476361011.15", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013476361011.15"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of Tokyo", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d", 
          "name": [
            "Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113, Tokyo, Japan"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Tsutsumi", 
        "givenName": "Akito", 
        "id": "sg:person.014421520501.28", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.014421520501.28"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of Tokyo", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d", 
          "name": [
            "Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113, Tokyo, Japan"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Kawamoto", 
        "givenName": "Eiko", 
        "id": "sg:person.010760224033.24", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.010760224033.24"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of Tokyo", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d", 
          "name": [
            "Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113, Tokyo, Japan"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Miyawaki", 
        "givenName": "Masahiro", 
        "id": "sg:person.012433160366.98", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.012433160366.98"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "University of Tokyo", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d", 
          "name": [
            "Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113, Tokyo, Japan"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Sato", 
        "givenName": "Hiroshi", 
        "id": "sg:person.010136162731.53", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.010136162731.53"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1029/94gl02787", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1051607905"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1086/626329", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1058822111"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1995-09", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1995-09-01", 
    "description": "Detailed field work at Okushiri Island and along the southwest coast of Hokkaido has revealed quantitatively (1) the advancing direction of tsunami on land, (2) the true tsunami height (i.e., height of tsunami, excluding its splashes, as measured from the ground) and (3) the flow velocity of tsunami on land, in heavily damaged areas. When a Japanese wooden house is swept away by tsunami, bolts that tie the house to its concrete foundation resist until the last moment and become bent towards the direction of the house being carried away. The orientations of more than 850 of those bent bolts and iron pipes (all that can be measured, mostly at Okushiri Island) and fell-down direction of about 400 trees clearly display how tsunami behaved on land and caused serious damage at various places. The true tsunami height was estimated by using several indicators, such as broken tree twigs and a window pane. The flow velocity of tsunami on land was determined by estimating the hydrodynamic force exerted on a bent handrail and a bent-down guardrail by the tsunami throughin situ strength tests. Contrary to the wide-spread recognition after the tsunami hazard, our results clearly indicate that only a few residential areas (i.e., Monai, eastern Hamatsumae, and a small portion at northern Aonae, all on Okushiri Island) were hit by a huge tsunami, with true heights reaching 10 m. Southern Aonae was completely swept away by tsunami that came directly from the focal region immediately to the west. The true tsunami height over the western sea wall of southern Aonae was estimated as 3 to 4 m. Northern Aonae also suffered severe damage due to tsunami that invaded from the corner zone of the sand dune (8 m high) and tide embankment at the northern end of the Aonae Harbor. This corner apparently acted as a tsunami amplifier, and tide embankment or breakwater can be quite dangerous when tsunami advances towards the corner it makes with the coast. The nearly complete devastation of Inaho at the northern end of Okushiri Island underscored the danger of tsunami whose propagation direction is parallel to the coast, since such tsunami waves tend to be amplified and tide embankment or breakwater is constructed low towards the coast at many harbors or fishing ports. Tsunami waves mostly of 2 to 4 m in true height swept away Hamatsumae on the southeast site of Okushiri Island where there were no coastal structures. Coastal structures were effective in reducing tsunami hazard at many sites. The maximum flow velocity at northern Aonae was estimated as 10 to 18 m/s (Tsutsumiet al., 1994), and such a high on-land velocity of tsunami near shore is probably due to the rapid shallowing of the deep sea near the epicentral region towards Okushiri Island. If the advancing direction, true height, and flow velocity of tsunami can be predicted by future analyses of tsunami generation and progagation, the analyses will be a powerful tool for future assessment of tsunami disasters, including the identification of blind spots in the tsunami hazard reduction.", 
    "genre": "research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00874389", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1136817", 
        "issn": [
          "0033-4553", 
          "1420-9136"
        ], 
        "name": "Pure and Applied Geophysics", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "3-4", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "144"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "Field survey report on tsunami disasters caused by the 1993 Southwest Hokkaido earthquake", 
    "pagination": "665-691", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "8fa3446053e698104828977787164cc9424e52af2718f38ea0a1c67ff23afb90"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/bf00874389"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1030151352"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00874389", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030151352"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-11T13:35", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000370_0000000370/records_46775_00000001.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "http://link.springer.com/10.1007/BF00874389"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00874389'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00874389'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00874389'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00874389'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

95 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      29 URIs      19 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00874389 schema:about anzsrc-for:04
2 anzsrc-for:0406
3 schema:author N17f3573dbd714617a735194cee0d10b1
4 schema:citation https://doi.org/10.1029/94gl02787
5 https://doi.org/10.1086/626329
6 schema:datePublished 1995-09
7 schema:datePublishedReg 1995-09-01
8 schema:description Detailed field work at Okushiri Island and along the southwest coast of Hokkaido has revealed quantitatively (1) the advancing direction of tsunami on land, (2) the true tsunami height (i.e., height of tsunami, excluding its splashes, as measured from the ground) and (3) the flow velocity of tsunami on land, in heavily damaged areas. When a Japanese wooden house is swept away by tsunami, bolts that tie the house to its concrete foundation resist until the last moment and become bent towards the direction of the house being carried away. The orientations of more than 850 of those bent bolts and iron pipes (all that can be measured, mostly at Okushiri Island) and fell-down direction of about 400 trees clearly display how tsunami behaved on land and caused serious damage at various places. The true tsunami height was estimated by using several indicators, such as broken tree twigs and a window pane. The flow velocity of tsunami on land was determined by estimating the hydrodynamic force exerted on a bent handrail and a bent-down guardrail by the tsunami throughin situ strength tests. Contrary to the wide-spread recognition after the tsunami hazard, our results clearly indicate that only a few residential areas (i.e., Monai, eastern Hamatsumae, and a small portion at northern Aonae, all on Okushiri Island) were hit by a huge tsunami, with true heights reaching 10 m. Southern Aonae was completely swept away by tsunami that came directly from the focal region immediately to the west. The true tsunami height over the western sea wall of southern Aonae was estimated as 3 to 4 m. Northern Aonae also suffered severe damage due to tsunami that invaded from the corner zone of the sand dune (8 m high) and tide embankment at the northern end of the Aonae Harbor. This corner apparently acted as a tsunami amplifier, and tide embankment or breakwater can be quite dangerous when tsunami advances towards the corner it makes with the coast. The nearly complete devastation of Inaho at the northern end of Okushiri Island underscored the danger of tsunami whose propagation direction is parallel to the coast, since such tsunami waves tend to be amplified and tide embankment or breakwater is constructed low towards the coast at many harbors or fishing ports. Tsunami waves mostly of 2 to 4 m in true height swept away Hamatsumae on the southeast site of Okushiri Island where there were no coastal structures. Coastal structures were effective in reducing tsunami hazard at many sites. The maximum flow velocity at northern Aonae was estimated as 10 to 18 m/s (Tsutsumiet al., 1994), and such a high on-land velocity of tsunami near shore is probably due to the rapid shallowing of the deep sea near the epicentral region towards Okushiri Island. If the advancing direction, true height, and flow velocity of tsunami can be predicted by future analyses of tsunami generation and progagation, the analyses will be a powerful tool for future assessment of tsunami disasters, including the identification of blind spots in the tsunami hazard reduction.
9 schema:genre research_article
10 schema:inLanguage en
11 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
12 schema:isPartOf N194f7eb5e20e4f35aae66827e1c50b9e
13 N61f9adc80039474aac94826c1523b616
14 sg:journal.1136817
15 schema:name Field survey report on tsunami disasters caused by the 1993 Southwest Hokkaido earthquake
16 schema:pagination 665-691
17 schema:productId N10f7b5c317234031b5759e88cab8b992
18 N32b0669661734090b173f8966cf750d8
19 N4cdade47a96b4070ba2fd22d7230a3ff
20 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030151352
21 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00874389
22 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-11T13:35
23 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
24 schema:sdPublisher Ne974f197c2d94788b0530215a4cda820
25 schema:url http://link.springer.com/10.1007/BF00874389
26 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
27 sgo:sdDataset articles
28 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
29 N10f7b5c317234031b5759e88cab8b992 schema:name doi
30 schema:value 10.1007/bf00874389
31 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
32 N17f3573dbd714617a735194cee0d10b1 rdf:first sg:person.013476361011.15
33 rdf:rest N57c8644506fa435d8633150c119c44b2
34 N194f7eb5e20e4f35aae66827e1c50b9e schema:issueNumber 3-4
35 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
36 N32b0669661734090b173f8966cf750d8 schema:name dimensions_id
37 schema:value pub.1030151352
38 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
39 N48bca10bc1ba4ab694f8c433f0535bd6 rdf:first sg:person.012433160366.98
40 rdf:rest Na5fbb87cb09f41069c69b86815d03b5f
41 N4cdade47a96b4070ba2fd22d7230a3ff schema:name readcube_id
42 schema:value 8fa3446053e698104828977787164cc9424e52af2718f38ea0a1c67ff23afb90
43 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
44 N57c8644506fa435d8633150c119c44b2 rdf:first sg:person.014421520501.28
45 rdf:rest N5e239b786c4340ea98ff8e36a8a16633
46 N5e239b786c4340ea98ff8e36a8a16633 rdf:first sg:person.010760224033.24
47 rdf:rest N48bca10bc1ba4ab694f8c433f0535bd6
48 N61f9adc80039474aac94826c1523b616 schema:volumeNumber 144
49 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
50 Na5fbb87cb09f41069c69b86815d03b5f rdf:first sg:person.010136162731.53
51 rdf:rest rdf:nil
52 Ne974f197c2d94788b0530215a4cda820 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
53 rdf:type schema:Organization
54 anzsrc-for:04 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
55 schema:name Earth Sciences
56 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
57 anzsrc-for:0406 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
58 schema:name Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
59 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
60 sg:journal.1136817 schema:issn 0033-4553
61 1420-9136
62 schema:name Pure and Applied Geophysics
63 rdf:type schema:Periodical
64 sg:person.010136162731.53 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d
65 schema:familyName Sato
66 schema:givenName Hiroshi
67 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.010136162731.53
68 rdf:type schema:Person
69 sg:person.010760224033.24 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d
70 schema:familyName Kawamoto
71 schema:givenName Eiko
72 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.010760224033.24
73 rdf:type schema:Person
74 sg:person.012433160366.98 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d
75 schema:familyName Miyawaki
76 schema:givenName Masahiro
77 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.012433160366.98
78 rdf:type schema:Person
79 sg:person.013476361011.15 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d
80 schema:familyName Shimamoto
81 schema:givenName Toshihiko
82 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013476361011.15
83 rdf:type schema:Person
84 sg:person.014421520501.28 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d
85 schema:familyName Tsutsumi
86 schema:givenName Akito
87 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.014421520501.28
88 rdf:type schema:Person
89 https://doi.org/10.1029/94gl02787 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1051607905
90 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
91 https://doi.org/10.1086/626329 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1058822111
92 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
93 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.26999.3d schema:alternateName University of Tokyo
94 schema:name Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, 113, Tokyo, Japan
95 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...