Behavoral ecology and social organization of a dendrobatid frog (Colostethus inguinalis) View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1980-09

AUTHORS

Kentwood D. Wells

ABSTRACT

A population ofColostethus inguinalis, a small diurnally active frog, was studied along a stream in seasonal tropical forest on Cerro Campana, Panama, from January through November 1976. Females laid eggs on land and carried up to 40 tadpoles on their backs to water. Tadpoles remained on their mothers' backs for up to 9 days. Sexual maturity was reached about 4–6 months after metamorphosis.Some females produced two clutches in 11 months. The average interval between clutches was 133 days. Reproduction occurred in every month except April, with a peak in May and June, the beginning of the wet season. Reproduction decreased in the wettest months.C. inguinalis has three vocalizations: an advertisement call, an encounter call used to challenge territorial intruders, and a close-range encounter call given just before an attack. The first two are given only by males, the last by females as well.Agonistic behavior included postural displays, chases, attacks, and wrestling. Encounters between same sex individuals were more likely to end in wrestling than those between males and females. Males were more effective than females in repelling intruders without physical contact.Courtship was prolonged and involved closerange vocal, visual, and tactile interactions between males and females.The behavior and spatial organization of males and females changed seasonally. Both sexes defended small territories near pools in the dry season, although males remained in one place longer than most females. In the wet season, males defended widely dispersed territories ten times the size of dry season territories. Females were more mobile and seldom defended territories for more than a few days at a time. Dry season territories appeared to provide access to moist retreats and feeding sites in short supply. Large male wet season territories were used for feeding, shelter, courtship, and mating.Both males and females defended territories against frogs of other species, but only encounters between maleC. inguinalis and maleColostethus pratti were frequent. Most of these occurred in the dry season, when the two species competed for the same retreats. There is some evidence that the two species can perceive each other's vocalizations. More... »

PAGES

199-209

References to SciGraph publications

  • 1977. The Courtship of Frogs in THE REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF AMPHIBIANS
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00569201

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00569201

    DIMENSIONS

    https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002460078


    Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
    Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

    JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

    TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

    [
      {
        "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
        "about": [
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Biological Sciences", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }, 
          {
            "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
            "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
            "name": "Ecology", 
            "type": "DefinedTerm"
          }
        ], 
        "author": [
          {
            "affiliation": {
              "alternateName": "Biological Sciences Group, University of Connecticut, 06268, Storrs, Connecticut, USA", 
              "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.63054.34", 
              "name": [
                "Biological Sciences Group, University of Connecticut, 06268, Storrs, Connecticut, USA"
              ], 
              "type": "Organization"
            }, 
            "familyName": "Wells", 
            "givenName": "Kentwood D.", 
            "id": "sg:person.013540636247.70", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013540636247.70"
            ], 
            "type": "Person"
          }
        ], 
        "citation": [
          {
            "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4757-6781-0_7", 
            "sameAs": [
              "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1012552758", 
              "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4757-6781-0_7"
            ], 
            "type": "CreativeWork"
          }
        ], 
        "datePublished": "1980-09", 
        "datePublishedReg": "1980-09-01", 
        "description": "A population ofColostethus inguinalis, a small diurnally active frog, was studied along a stream in seasonal tropical forest on Cerro Campana, Panama, from January through November 1976. Females laid eggs on land and carried up to 40 tadpoles on their backs to water. Tadpoles remained on their mothers' backs for up to 9 days. Sexual maturity was reached about 4\u20136 months after metamorphosis.Some females produced two clutches in 11 months. The average interval between clutches was 133 days. Reproduction occurred in every month except April, with a peak in May and June, the beginning of the wet season. Reproduction decreased in the wettest months.C. inguinalis has three vocalizations: an advertisement call, an encounter call used to challenge territorial intruders, and a close-range encounter call given just before an attack. The first two are given only by males, the last by females as well.Agonistic behavior included postural displays, chases, attacks, and wrestling. Encounters between same sex individuals were more likely to end in wrestling than those between males and females. Males were more effective than females in repelling intruders without physical contact.Courtship was prolonged and involved closerange vocal, visual, and tactile interactions between males and females.The behavior and spatial organization of males and females changed seasonally. Both sexes defended small territories near pools in the dry season, although males remained in one place longer than most females. In the wet season, males defended widely dispersed territories ten times the size of dry season territories. Females were more mobile and seldom defended territories for more than a few days at a time. Dry season territories appeared to provide access to moist retreats and feeding sites in short supply. Large male wet season territories were used for feeding, shelter, courtship, and mating.Both males and females defended territories against frogs of other species, but only encounters between maleC. inguinalis and maleColostethus pratti were frequent. Most of these occurred in the dry season, when the two species competed for the same retreats. There is some evidence that the two species can perceive each other's vocalizations.", 
        "genre": "article", 
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00569201", 
        "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
        "isPartOf": [
          {
            "id": "sg:journal.1085476", 
            "issn": [
              "0340-5443", 
              "1432-0762"
            ], 
            "name": "Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology", 
            "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
            "type": "Periodical"
          }, 
          {
            "issueNumber": "3", 
            "type": "PublicationIssue"
          }, 
          {
            "type": "PublicationVolume", 
            "volumeNumber": "6"
          }
        ], 
        "keywords": [
          "seasonal tropical forest", 
          "dry season", 
          "wet season", 
          "tropical forests", 
          "Cerro Campana", 
          "dendrobatid frogs", 
          "active frogs", 
          "advertisement call", 
          "territorial intruders", 
          "same-sex individuals", 
          "sexual maturity", 
          "most females", 
          "sex individuals", 
          "species", 
          "frogs", 
          "spatial organization", 
          "postural displays", 
          "small territories", 
          "courtship", 
          "encounter calls", 
          "reproduction", 
          "tadpoles", 
          "mother's back", 
          "clutches", 
          "agonistic behavior", 
          "season", 
          "wet months", 
          "ecology", 
          "mating", 
          "pratti", 
          "females", 
          "Panama", 
          "metamorphosis", 
          "forest", 
          "eggs", 
          "social organization", 
          "males", 
          "physical contact", 
          "pool", 
          "short supply", 
          "vocalizations", 
          "chase", 
          "sites", 
          "feeding", 
          "maturity", 
          "shelter", 
          "population", 
          "territory", 
          "average interval", 
          "interaction", 
          "intruders", 
          "Campana", 
          "organization", 
          "evidence", 
          "ten times", 
          "individuals", 
          "land", 
          "water", 
          "days", 
          "size", 
          "supply", 
          "streams", 
          "display", 
          "retreat", 
          "contact", 
          "sex", 
          "attacks", 
          "calls", 
          "time", 
          "beginning", 
          "behavior", 
          "encounters", 
          "place", 
          "peak", 
          "interval", 
          "tactile interaction", 
          "back", 
          "access", 
          "months", 
          "wrestling"
        ], 
        "name": "Behavoral ecology and social organization of a dendrobatid frog (Colostethus inguinalis)", 
        "pagination": "199-209", 
        "productId": [
          {
            "name": "dimensions_id", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "pub.1002460078"
            ]
          }, 
          {
            "name": "doi", 
            "type": "PropertyValue", 
            "value": [
              "10.1007/bf00569201"
            ]
          }
        ], 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00569201", 
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002460078"
        ], 
        "sdDataset": "articles", 
        "sdDatePublished": "2022-12-01T06:18", 
        "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
        "sdPublisher": {
          "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221201/entities/gbq_results/article/article_171.jsonl", 
        "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
        "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00569201"
      }
    ]
     

    Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

    HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

    JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00569201'

    N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00569201'

    Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

    curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00569201'

    RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

    curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00569201'


     

    This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

    141 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      106 URIs      97 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

    Subject Predicate Object
    1 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00569201 schema:about anzsrc-for:06
    2 anzsrc-for:0602
    3 schema:author N66c31d9dea2b48938826e66194a5df62
    4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4757-6781-0_7
    5 schema:datePublished 1980-09
    6 schema:datePublishedReg 1980-09-01
    7 schema:description A population ofColostethus inguinalis, a small diurnally active frog, was studied along a stream in seasonal tropical forest on Cerro Campana, Panama, from January through November 1976. Females laid eggs on land and carried up to 40 tadpoles on their backs to water. Tadpoles remained on their mothers' backs for up to 9 days. Sexual maturity was reached about 4–6 months after metamorphosis.Some females produced two clutches in 11 months. The average interval between clutches was 133 days. Reproduction occurred in every month except April, with a peak in May and June, the beginning of the wet season. Reproduction decreased in the wettest months.C. inguinalis has three vocalizations: an advertisement call, an encounter call used to challenge territorial intruders, and a close-range encounter call given just before an attack. The first two are given only by males, the last by females as well.Agonistic behavior included postural displays, chases, attacks, and wrestling. Encounters between same sex individuals were more likely to end in wrestling than those between males and females. Males were more effective than females in repelling intruders without physical contact.Courtship was prolonged and involved closerange vocal, visual, and tactile interactions between males and females.The behavior and spatial organization of males and females changed seasonally. Both sexes defended small territories near pools in the dry season, although males remained in one place longer than most females. In the wet season, males defended widely dispersed territories ten times the size of dry season territories. Females were more mobile and seldom defended territories for more than a few days at a time. Dry season territories appeared to provide access to moist retreats and feeding sites in short supply. Large male wet season territories were used for feeding, shelter, courtship, and mating.Both males and females defended territories against frogs of other species, but only encounters between maleC. inguinalis and maleColostethus pratti were frequent. Most of these occurred in the dry season, when the two species competed for the same retreats. There is some evidence that the two species can perceive each other's vocalizations.
    8 schema:genre article
    9 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
    10 schema:isPartOf N855e5a489d074716abb94a533c9574d4
    11 Nf0dc46d1dbab4e03914dd5deff456544
    12 sg:journal.1085476
    13 schema:keywords Campana
    14 Cerro Campana
    15 Panama
    16 access
    17 active frogs
    18 advertisement call
    19 agonistic behavior
    20 attacks
    21 average interval
    22 back
    23 beginning
    24 behavior
    25 calls
    26 chase
    27 clutches
    28 contact
    29 courtship
    30 days
    31 dendrobatid frogs
    32 display
    33 dry season
    34 ecology
    35 eggs
    36 encounter calls
    37 encounters
    38 evidence
    39 feeding
    40 females
    41 forest
    42 frogs
    43 individuals
    44 interaction
    45 interval
    46 intruders
    47 land
    48 males
    49 mating
    50 maturity
    51 metamorphosis
    52 months
    53 most females
    54 mother's back
    55 organization
    56 peak
    57 physical contact
    58 place
    59 pool
    60 population
    61 postural displays
    62 pratti
    63 reproduction
    64 retreat
    65 same-sex individuals
    66 season
    67 seasonal tropical forest
    68 sex
    69 sex individuals
    70 sexual maturity
    71 shelter
    72 short supply
    73 sites
    74 size
    75 small territories
    76 social organization
    77 spatial organization
    78 species
    79 streams
    80 supply
    81 tactile interaction
    82 tadpoles
    83 ten times
    84 territorial intruders
    85 territory
    86 time
    87 tropical forests
    88 vocalizations
    89 water
    90 wet months
    91 wet season
    92 wrestling
    93 schema:name Behavoral ecology and social organization of a dendrobatid frog (Colostethus inguinalis)
    94 schema:pagination 199-209
    95 schema:productId N19eec69715c64087a18e40099faa6489
    96 N2e6f7ef25dc94fb3a8158c647a6af4f2
    97 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002460078
    98 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00569201
    99 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-12-01T06:18
    100 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
    101 schema:sdPublisher N64157384f43f4db38bd3d256cce81fb8
    102 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00569201
    103 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
    104 sgo:sdDataset articles
    105 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
    106 N19eec69715c64087a18e40099faa6489 schema:name doi
    107 schema:value 10.1007/bf00569201
    108 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    109 N2e6f7ef25dc94fb3a8158c647a6af4f2 schema:name dimensions_id
    110 schema:value pub.1002460078
    111 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
    112 N64157384f43f4db38bd3d256cce81fb8 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
    113 rdf:type schema:Organization
    114 N66c31d9dea2b48938826e66194a5df62 rdf:first sg:person.013540636247.70
    115 rdf:rest rdf:nil
    116 N855e5a489d074716abb94a533c9574d4 schema:volumeNumber 6
    117 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
    118 Nf0dc46d1dbab4e03914dd5deff456544 schema:issueNumber 3
    119 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
    120 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    121 schema:name Biological Sciences
    122 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    123 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
    124 schema:name Ecology
    125 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
    126 sg:journal.1085476 schema:issn 0340-5443
    127 1432-0762
    128 schema:name Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
    129 schema:publisher Springer Nature
    130 rdf:type schema:Periodical
    131 sg:person.013540636247.70 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.63054.34
    132 schema:familyName Wells
    133 schema:givenName Kentwood D.
    134 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013540636247.70
    135 rdf:type schema:Person
    136 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4757-6781-0_7 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1012552758
    137 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4757-6781-0_7
    138 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
    139 grid-institutes:grid.63054.34 schema:alternateName Biological Sciences Group, University of Connecticut, 06268, Storrs, Connecticut, USA
    140 schema:name Biological Sciences Group, University of Connecticut, 06268, Storrs, Connecticut, USA
    141 rdf:type schema:Organization
     




    Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


    ...