Distribution of six major copepod species around South Georgia in early summer View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1989-06

AUTHORS

Angus Atkinson

ABSTRACT

An intensive net sampling survey was conducted around the island of South Georgia during November/December 1981. The distribution and copepodite stage structure of the dominant copepods Calanoides acutus, Calanus simillimus, C. propinquus, Rhincalanus gigas, Metridia lucens and Metridia gerlachei were compared. The herbivorous species had completed their spring vertical migration and their summer generations were developing during the survey. At every station, Calanoides acutus was noticeably more advanced than Rhincalanus gigas in its reproductive cycle. The species were also more advanced in their development in the SE oceanic part of the survey area than in the NW. However, copepod development rates are rapid at this time of year, and this apparent regional difference may be due mainly to temporal variation during the four weeks of the survey. A truly regional variation in timing of reproduction was found when development was compared between shelf and oceanic waters. Spawning of Rhincalanus gigas and particularly of Calanoides acutus was later over the shelf. The age structure of the epi-mesopelagic metridinids also differed between shelf and oceanic waters, but no age differences were found for either Calanus simillimus or C. propinquus, both of which live and spawn higher in the water column than the other species. The presence of the South Georgia shelf also limited the overall abundance of the two deeper living metridinids. However, the length of time between spawning (and production of large numbers of early copepodids) and sampling had the largest influence on observed species abundance within the survey area. More... »

PAGES

353-363

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00442525

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00442525

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1025974300


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Ecology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, CB3 0ET, Cambridge, UK", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.478592.5", 
          "name": [
            "British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, CB3 0ET, Cambridge, UK"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Atkinson", 
        "givenName": "Angus", 
        "id": "sg:person.0645015072.01", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0645015072.01"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-642-84074-6_16", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030774124", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-84074-6_16"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-8273-1_8", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017154986", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-8273-1_8"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-94-015-7204-0_11", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036908721", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-015-7204-0_11"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00442037", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1006628119", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00442037"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00263879", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001254368", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00263879"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00264723", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033159714", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00264723"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00441763", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1018795939", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00441763"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-642-82275-9_45", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1044252358", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-82275-9_45"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00443379", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033096981", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00443379"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00394210", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1053557905", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00394210"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1989-06", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1989-06-01", 
    "description": "An intensive net sampling survey was conducted around the island of South Georgia during November/December 1981. The distribution and copepodite stage structure of the dominant copepods Calanoides acutus, Calanus simillimus, C. propinquus, Rhincalanus gigas, Metridia lucens and Metridia gerlachei were compared. The herbivorous species had completed their spring vertical migration and their summer generations were developing during the survey. At every station, Calanoides acutus was noticeably more advanced than Rhincalanus gigas in its reproductive cycle. The species were also more advanced in their development in the SE oceanic part of the survey area than in the NW. However, copepod development rates are rapid at this time of year, and this apparent regional difference may be due mainly to temporal variation during the four weeks of the survey. A truly regional variation in timing of reproduction was found when development was compared between shelf and oceanic waters. Spawning of Rhincalanus gigas and particularly of Calanoides acutus was later over the shelf. The age structure of the epi-mesopelagic metridinids also differed between shelf and oceanic waters, but no age differences were found for either Calanus simillimus or C. propinquus, both of which live and spawn higher in the water column than the other species. The presence of the South Georgia shelf also limited the overall abundance of the two deeper living metridinids. However, the length of time between spawning (and production of large numbers of early copepodids) and sampling had the largest influence on observed species abundance within the survey area.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00442525", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1123873", 
        "issn": [
          "0722-4060", 
          "1432-2056"
        ], 
        "name": "Polar Biology", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "6", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "9"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "Rhincalanus gigas", 
      "observed species abundances", 
      "Calanoides acutus", 
      "South Georgia", 
      "timing of reproduction", 
      "South Georgia shelf", 
      "oceanic waters", 
      "Calanus simillimus", 
      "major copepod species", 
      "herbivorous species", 
      "species abundance", 
      "overall abundance", 
      "copepod species", 
      "summer generation", 
      "net sampling survey", 
      "copepods Calanoides acutus", 
      "Georgia shelf", 
      "species", 
      "reproductive cycle", 
      "gigas", 
      "acutus", 
      "development rate", 
      "Metridia gerlachei", 
      "propinquus", 
      "early summer", 
      "vertical migration", 
      "time of year", 
      "age structure", 
      "abundance", 
      "water column", 
      "simillimus", 
      "stage structure", 
      "temporal variation", 
      "reproduction", 
      "survey area", 
      "gerlachei", 
      "Metridia", 
      "islands", 
      "variation", 
      "Georgia", 
      "migration", 
      "shelf", 
      "sampling survey", 
      "apparent regional differences", 
      "development", 
      "summer", 
      "structure", 
      "cycle", 
      "distribution", 
      "water", 
      "large influence", 
      "presence", 
      "timing", 
      "length of time", 
      "differences", 
      "regional variation", 
      "oceanic part", 
      "regional differences", 
      "generation", 
      "area", 
      "length", 
      "sampling", 
      "part", 
      "time", 
      "column", 
      "rate", 
      "survey", 
      "influence", 
      "years", 
      "stations", 
      "weeks", 
      "NW", 
      "age differences"
    ], 
    "name": "Distribution of six major copepod species around South Georgia in early summer", 
    "pagination": "353-363", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1025974300"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/bf00442525"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00442525", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1025974300"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-05-10T09:42", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220509/entities/gbq_results/article/article_213.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00442525"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00442525'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00442525'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00442525'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00442525'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

171 TRIPLES      22 PREDICATES      109 URIs      91 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00442525 schema:about anzsrc-for:06
2 anzsrc-for:0602
3 schema:author Nb8e1fd6ff0a945b2a2b9dca9dbc01632
4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-8273-1_8
5 sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-642-82275-9_45
6 sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-642-84074-6_16
7 sg:pub.10.1007/978-94-015-7204-0_11
8 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00263879
9 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00264723
10 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00394210
11 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00441763
12 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00442037
13 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00443379
14 schema:datePublished 1989-06
15 schema:datePublishedReg 1989-06-01
16 schema:description An intensive net sampling survey was conducted around the island of South Georgia during November/December 1981. The distribution and copepodite stage structure of the dominant copepods Calanoides acutus, Calanus simillimus, C. propinquus, Rhincalanus gigas, Metridia lucens and Metridia gerlachei were compared. The herbivorous species had completed their spring vertical migration and their summer generations were developing during the survey. At every station, Calanoides acutus was noticeably more advanced than Rhincalanus gigas in its reproductive cycle. The species were also more advanced in their development in the SE oceanic part of the survey area than in the NW. However, copepod development rates are rapid at this time of year, and this apparent regional difference may be due mainly to temporal variation during the four weeks of the survey. A truly regional variation in timing of reproduction was found when development was compared between shelf and oceanic waters. Spawning of Rhincalanus gigas and particularly of Calanoides acutus was later over the shelf. The age structure of the epi-mesopelagic metridinids also differed between shelf and oceanic waters, but no age differences were found for either Calanus simillimus or C. propinquus, both of which live and spawn higher in the water column than the other species. The presence of the South Georgia shelf also limited the overall abundance of the two deeper living metridinids. However, the length of time between spawning (and production of large numbers of early copepodids) and sampling had the largest influence on observed species abundance within the survey area.
17 schema:genre article
18 schema:inLanguage en
19 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
20 schema:isPartOf N17ce5dbe92bb4c8888fb9ae04170500a
21 N76b128b98bc840e2afc354148c3d5952
22 sg:journal.1123873
23 schema:keywords Calanoides acutus
24 Calanus simillimus
25 Georgia
26 Georgia shelf
27 Metridia
28 Metridia gerlachei
29 NW
30 Rhincalanus gigas
31 South Georgia
32 South Georgia shelf
33 abundance
34 acutus
35 age differences
36 age structure
37 apparent regional differences
38 area
39 column
40 copepod species
41 copepods Calanoides acutus
42 cycle
43 development
44 development rate
45 differences
46 distribution
47 early summer
48 generation
49 gerlachei
50 gigas
51 herbivorous species
52 influence
53 islands
54 large influence
55 length
56 length of time
57 major copepod species
58 migration
59 net sampling survey
60 observed species abundances
61 oceanic part
62 oceanic waters
63 overall abundance
64 part
65 presence
66 propinquus
67 rate
68 regional differences
69 regional variation
70 reproduction
71 reproductive cycle
72 sampling
73 sampling survey
74 shelf
75 simillimus
76 species
77 species abundance
78 stage structure
79 stations
80 structure
81 summer
82 summer generation
83 survey
84 survey area
85 temporal variation
86 time
87 time of year
88 timing
89 timing of reproduction
90 variation
91 vertical migration
92 water
93 water column
94 weeks
95 years
96 schema:name Distribution of six major copepod species around South Georgia in early summer
97 schema:pagination 353-363
98 schema:productId N0ff5bba2c18f48f283f38fe9ac6a9f36
99 N452e310e22464071b30e032113a1c86f
100 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1025974300
101 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00442525
102 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-05-10T09:42
103 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
104 schema:sdPublisher N69a85b4f72034d968148199b7db3c901
105 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00442525
106 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
107 sgo:sdDataset articles
108 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
109 N0ff5bba2c18f48f283f38fe9ac6a9f36 schema:name dimensions_id
110 schema:value pub.1025974300
111 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
112 N17ce5dbe92bb4c8888fb9ae04170500a schema:issueNumber 6
113 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
114 N452e310e22464071b30e032113a1c86f schema:name doi
115 schema:value 10.1007/bf00442525
116 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
117 N69a85b4f72034d968148199b7db3c901 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
118 rdf:type schema:Organization
119 N76b128b98bc840e2afc354148c3d5952 schema:volumeNumber 9
120 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
121 Nb8e1fd6ff0a945b2a2b9dca9dbc01632 rdf:first sg:person.0645015072.01
122 rdf:rest rdf:nil
123 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
124 schema:name Biological Sciences
125 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
126 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
127 schema:name Ecology
128 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
129 sg:journal.1123873 schema:issn 0722-4060
130 1432-2056
131 schema:name Polar Biology
132 schema:publisher Springer Nature
133 rdf:type schema:Periodical
134 sg:person.0645015072.01 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.478592.5
135 schema:familyName Atkinson
136 schema:givenName Angus
137 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0645015072.01
138 rdf:type schema:Person
139 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-8273-1_8 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017154986
140 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-8273-1_8
141 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
142 sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-642-82275-9_45 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1044252358
143 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-82275-9_45
144 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
145 sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-642-84074-6_16 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030774124
146 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-84074-6_16
147 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
148 sg:pub.10.1007/978-94-015-7204-0_11 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036908721
149 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-015-7204-0_11
150 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
151 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00263879 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1001254368
152 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00263879
153 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
154 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00264723 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033159714
155 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00264723
156 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
157 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00394210 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1053557905
158 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00394210
159 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
160 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00441763 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1018795939
161 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00441763
162 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
163 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00442037 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1006628119
164 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00442037
165 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
166 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00443379 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033096981
167 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00443379
168 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
169 grid-institutes:grid.478592.5 schema:alternateName British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, CB3 0ET, Cambridge, UK
170 schema:name British Antarctic Survey, Natural Environment Research Council, High Cross, Madingley Road, CB3 0ET, Cambridge, UK
171 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...