Patterns of nitrogen utilization in the soybean View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1975-01

AUTHORS

Philip S. Thibodeau, Ernest G. Jaworski

ABSTRACT

The patterns of nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase activity in the leaves, and nitrogen fixation by the nodules were investigated in field-grown soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) over the growing season.The level of nitrate-reductase activity generally paralleled the concentration of nitrate in the leaf tissue over the entire growing season. A precipitous drop in both parameters was noted within 2–3 weeks after flowering. These parameters decreased by 80–95% at mid-pod fill, a stage where ovule (seed) development was in the logarithmic growth phase, placing a heavy demand on the plant for both energy and fixed nitrogen.The activity of nitrogen fixation of soybean root nodules bore a reciprocal relationship to that of nitrate reductase. The maximum levels of nitrogen fixation were reached at early pod fill when nitrate reductase activity had dropped to 25% of maximum activity. A rapid loss of nitrogen fixation activity occurred shortly after bean fill was initiated, again at a time when the ovules were developing at maximal rates.The total protein content of soybean leaves increased over the season to a maximum level at mid-pod fill. This was followed by a 50% drop over the next 3-week period when the plants approached senescence. This drop corresponded to that found for nitrogen fixation. A similar pattern was noted for watersoluble proteins in the leaf.These studies suggest that there is a close and competitive relationship between the processes of nitrate reduction and nitrogen fixation, with the latter process dominating as the major source of fixed nitrogen after the plants have flowered and initiated pods. At this transitional stage, both soil and environmental effects could cause pertrubation in these processes that could lead to a nitrogen stress causing flower and pod abscission.The rapid decay of nitrogen fixation at the time of midpod fill also suggests a competition between roots (nodules) and pods for available photosynthate. This competition appears to lead to the breakdown of foliar proteins and senescence. More... »

PAGES

133-147

References to SciGraph publications

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00388374

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00388374

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1037494388

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24430370


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