Coping with herbivory: Photosynthetic capacity and resource allocation in two semiarid Agropyron bunchgrasses View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1981-08

AUTHORS

M. M. Caldwell, J. H. Richards, D. A. Johnson, R. S. Nowak, R. S. Dzurec

ABSTRACT

Agropyron desertorum, a grazing-tolerant bunchgrass introduced to the western U.S. from Eurasia, and Agropyron spicatum, a grazing-sensitive bunchgrass native to North America, were examined in the field for photosynthetic capacity, growth, resource allocation, and tiller dynamics. These observations allowed identification of physiological characteristics that may contribute to grazing tolerance in semiarid environments. A uniform matrix of sagebrush, Artemisia tridentata, provided an ecologically relevant competitive environment for both bunch-grass species. Physiological activity, growth, and allocation were also followed during recovery from a severe defoliation treatment and were correlated with tiller dynamics.Potential photosynthetic carbon uptake of both species was dominated by stems and leaf sheaths during June, when maximum uptake rates occurred. For both species, water use efficiency of stems and sheaths was similar to that of leaf blades, but nitrogen investment per photosynthetic surface area was less than in blades. In addition, soluble carbohydrates in stems and sheaths of both species constituted the major labile carbon pools in control plants. Contrary to current theory, these findings suggest that culms from which leaf blades have been removed should be of considerable value to defoliated bunchgrasses, and in the case of partial defoliation could provide important supplies of organic nutrients for regrowth. These interpretations, based on total pool sizes, differ markedly from previous interpretations based on carbohydrate concentrations alone, which suggested that crowns contain large carbohydrate reserves. In this study, crowns of both species contained a minor component of the total plant carbohydrate pool.Following defoliation, A. desertorum plants rapidly reestablished a canopy with 3 to 5 times the photosynthetic surface of A. spicatum plants. This difference was primarily due to the greater number of quickly growing new tillers produced following defoliation. Agropyron spicatum produced few new tillers following defoliation despite adequate moisture, and carbohydrate pools that were equivalent to those in A. desertorum.Leaf blades of regrowing tillers had higher photosynthetic capacity than blades on unclipped plants of both species, but the relative increase, considered on a unit mass, area, or nitrogen basis, was greater for A. desertorum than for A. spicatum. Agropyron desertorum also had lower investment of nitrogen and biomass per unit area of photosynthetic tissues, more tillers and leaves per bunch, and shorter lived stems, all of which can contribute to greater tolerance of partial defoliation.Greater flexibility of resource allocation following defoliation was demonstrated by A. desertorum for both nitrogen and carbohydrates. Relatively more allocation to the shoot system and curtailed root growth in A. desertorum resulted in more rapid approach to the preclipping balance between the root and shoot systems, whereas root growth in A. spicatum continued unabated following defoliation. Nitrogen required for regrowth in both species was apparently supplied by uptake rather than reserve depletion. Carbohydrate pools in the shoot system of both species remained very low following severe defoliation and were approximately equivalent to carbon fixed in one day by photosynthesis of the whole canopy. More... »

PAGES

14-24

Journal

TITLE

Oecologia

ISSUE

1

VOLUME

50

Author Affiliations

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00378790

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00378790

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049287341

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28310058


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0607", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Plant Biology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Utah State University", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Range Science, Utah State University, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA", 
            "the Ecology Center, UMC 52, Utah State University, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Caldwell", 
        "givenName": "M. M.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0754773040.63", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0754773040.63"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Utah State University", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Range Science, Utah State University, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA", 
            "the Ecology Center, UMC 52, Utah State University, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Richards", 
        "givenName": "J. H.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0743207502.31", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0743207502.31"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Utah State University", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c", 
          "name": [
            "USDA-SEA-AR, Crops Research Laboratory, Utah State University UMC 63, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Johnson", 
        "givenName": "D. A.", 
        "id": "sg:person.015674413007.69", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.015674413007.69"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Utah State University", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Range Science, Utah State University, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA", 
            "the Ecology Center, UMC 52, Utah State University, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Nowak", 
        "givenName": "R. S.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01044643154.17", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01044643154.17"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Utah State University", 
          "id": "https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Range Science, Utah State University, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA", 
            "the Ecology Center, UMC 52, Utah State University, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Dzurec", 
        "givenName": "R. S.", 
        "id": "sg:person.013547760707.92", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013547760707.92"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/0305-1978(77)90007-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002310988"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/0305-1978(77)90007-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002310988"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.17.4.540", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1014302149"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1016/b978-0-12-774750-7.50028-2", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017106372"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3054.1979.tb03207.x", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017623816"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00332843", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1020689518", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00332843"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00332843", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1020689518", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00332843"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.66.1.97", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021023545"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf02860815", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027179894", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02860815"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf02860815", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027179894", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02860815"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.1960.tb06195.x", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033962085"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1071/pp9800527", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1034836457"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00346476", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050293744", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00346476"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00346476", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050293744", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00346476"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1021/ac60111a017", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1055031436"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1265481", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1062470892"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1126/science.155.3767.1248", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1062490773"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1126/science.161.3842.637", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1062495095"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1126/science.165.3891.415", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1062497553"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.1126/science.198.4322.1177", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1062516158"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2134/agronj1978.00021962007000040035x", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1068989933"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/1930618", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069655151"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/1932194", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069656582"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/1932611", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069656947"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/1934971", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069659140"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/1942242", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069664722"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/2402964", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069912648"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/3894509", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102530988"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/3893839", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102530993"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/3896253", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102532312"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/3896791", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102532959"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/3896873", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102532971"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/1550500", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102732107"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "https://doi.org/10.2307/1550499", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102732113"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1981-08", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1981-08-01", 
    "description": "Agropyron desertorum, a grazing-tolerant bunchgrass introduced to the western U.S. from Eurasia, and Agropyron spicatum, a grazing-sensitive bunchgrass native to North America, were examined in the field for photosynthetic capacity, growth, resource allocation, and tiller dynamics. These observations allowed identification of physiological characteristics that may contribute to grazing tolerance in semiarid environments. A uniform matrix of sagebrush, Artemisia tridentata, provided an ecologically relevant competitive environment for both bunch-grass species. Physiological activity, growth, and allocation were also followed during recovery from a severe defoliation treatment and were correlated with tiller dynamics.Potential photosynthetic carbon uptake of both species was dominated by stems and leaf sheaths during June, when maximum uptake rates occurred. For both species, water use efficiency of stems and sheaths was similar to that of leaf blades, but nitrogen investment per photosynthetic surface area was less than in blades. In addition, soluble carbohydrates in stems and sheaths of both species constituted the major labile carbon pools in control plants. Contrary to current theory, these findings suggest that culms from which leaf blades have been removed should be of considerable value to defoliated bunchgrasses, and in the case of partial defoliation could provide important supplies of organic nutrients for regrowth. These interpretations, based on total pool sizes, differ markedly from previous interpretations based on carbohydrate concentrations alone, which suggested that crowns contain large carbohydrate reserves. In this study, crowns of both species contained a minor component of the total plant carbohydrate pool.Following defoliation, A. desertorum plants rapidly reestablished a canopy with 3 to 5 times the photosynthetic surface of A. spicatum plants. This difference was primarily due to the greater number of quickly growing new tillers produced following defoliation. Agropyron spicatum produced few new tillers following defoliation despite adequate moisture, and carbohydrate pools that were equivalent to those in A. desertorum.Leaf blades of regrowing tillers had higher photosynthetic capacity than blades on unclipped plants of both species, but the relative increase, considered on a unit mass, area, or nitrogen basis, was greater for A. desertorum than for A. spicatum. Agropyron desertorum also had lower investment of nitrogen and biomass per unit area of photosynthetic tissues, more tillers and leaves per bunch, and shorter lived stems, all of which can contribute to greater tolerance of partial defoliation.Greater flexibility of resource allocation following defoliation was demonstrated by A. desertorum for both nitrogen and carbohydrates. Relatively more allocation to the shoot system and curtailed root growth in A. desertorum resulted in more rapid approach to the preclipping balance between the root and shoot systems, whereas root growth in A. spicatum continued unabated following defoliation. Nitrogen required for regrowth in both species was apparently supplied by uptake rather than reserve depletion. Carbohydrate pools in the shoot system of both species remained very low following severe defoliation and were approximately equivalent to carbon fixed in one day by photosynthesis of the whole canopy.", 
    "genre": "research_article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00378790", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1009586", 
        "issn": [
          "0029-8549", 
          "1432-1939"
        ], 
        "name": "Oecologia", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "1", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "50"
      }
    ], 
    "name": "Coping with herbivory: Photosynthetic capacity and resource allocation in two semiarid Agropyron bunchgrasses", 
    "pagination": "14-24", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/bf00378790"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "eacbc6fd497b3947c9df523b20bd42ef056ef51bc4e051c497e46c77930543e8"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1049287341"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "nlm_unique_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "0150372"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "pubmed_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "28310058"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00378790", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049287341"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-15T08:50", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000374_0000000374/records_119732_00000001.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "http://link.springer.com/10.1007%2FBF00378790"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00378790'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00378790'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00378790'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00378790'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

192 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      59 URIs      21 LITERALS      9 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00378790 schema:about anzsrc-for:06
2 anzsrc-for:0607
3 schema:author Nac938bee18ca47419def2c0df6a0fce0
4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/bf00332843
5 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00346476
6 sg:pub.10.1007/bf02860815
7 https://doi.org/10.1016/0305-1978(77)90007-2
8 https://doi.org/10.1016/b978-0-12-774750-7.50028-2
9 https://doi.org/10.1021/ac60111a017
10 https://doi.org/10.1071/pp9800527
11 https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.17.4.540
12 https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.66.1.97
13 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3054.1979.tb03207.x
14 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.1960.tb06195.x
15 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1265481
16 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.155.3767.1248
17 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.161.3842.637
18 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.165.3891.415
19 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.198.4322.1177
20 https://doi.org/10.2134/agronj1978.00021962007000040035x
21 https://doi.org/10.2307/1550499
22 https://doi.org/10.2307/1550500
23 https://doi.org/10.2307/1930618
24 https://doi.org/10.2307/1932194
25 https://doi.org/10.2307/1932611
26 https://doi.org/10.2307/1934971
27 https://doi.org/10.2307/1942242
28 https://doi.org/10.2307/2402964
29 https://doi.org/10.2307/3893839
30 https://doi.org/10.2307/3894509
31 https://doi.org/10.2307/3896253
32 https://doi.org/10.2307/3896791
33 https://doi.org/10.2307/3896873
34 schema:datePublished 1981-08
35 schema:datePublishedReg 1981-08-01
36 schema:description Agropyron desertorum, a grazing-tolerant bunchgrass introduced to the western U.S. from Eurasia, and Agropyron spicatum, a grazing-sensitive bunchgrass native to North America, were examined in the field for photosynthetic capacity, growth, resource allocation, and tiller dynamics. These observations allowed identification of physiological characteristics that may contribute to grazing tolerance in semiarid environments. A uniform matrix of sagebrush, Artemisia tridentata, provided an ecologically relevant competitive environment for both bunch-grass species. Physiological activity, growth, and allocation were also followed during recovery from a severe defoliation treatment and were correlated with tiller dynamics.Potential photosynthetic carbon uptake of both species was dominated by stems and leaf sheaths during June, when maximum uptake rates occurred. For both species, water use efficiency of stems and sheaths was similar to that of leaf blades, but nitrogen investment per photosynthetic surface area was less than in blades. In addition, soluble carbohydrates in stems and sheaths of both species constituted the major labile carbon pools in control plants. Contrary to current theory, these findings suggest that culms from which leaf blades have been removed should be of considerable value to defoliated bunchgrasses, and in the case of partial defoliation could provide important supplies of organic nutrients for regrowth. These interpretations, based on total pool sizes, differ markedly from previous interpretations based on carbohydrate concentrations alone, which suggested that crowns contain large carbohydrate reserves. In this study, crowns of both species contained a minor component of the total plant carbohydrate pool.Following defoliation, A. desertorum plants rapidly reestablished a canopy with 3 to 5 times the photosynthetic surface of A. spicatum plants. This difference was primarily due to the greater number of quickly growing new tillers produced following defoliation. Agropyron spicatum produced few new tillers following defoliation despite adequate moisture, and carbohydrate pools that were equivalent to those in A. desertorum.Leaf blades of regrowing tillers had higher photosynthetic capacity than blades on unclipped plants of both species, but the relative increase, considered on a unit mass, area, or nitrogen basis, was greater for A. desertorum than for A. spicatum. Agropyron desertorum also had lower investment of nitrogen and biomass per unit area of photosynthetic tissues, more tillers and leaves per bunch, and shorter lived stems, all of which can contribute to greater tolerance of partial defoliation.Greater flexibility of resource allocation following defoliation was demonstrated by A. desertorum for both nitrogen and carbohydrates. Relatively more allocation to the shoot system and curtailed root growth in A. desertorum resulted in more rapid approach to the preclipping balance between the root and shoot systems, whereas root growth in A. spicatum continued unabated following defoliation. Nitrogen required for regrowth in both species was apparently supplied by uptake rather than reserve depletion. Carbohydrate pools in the shoot system of both species remained very low following severe defoliation and were approximately equivalent to carbon fixed in one day by photosynthesis of the whole canopy.
37 schema:genre research_article
38 schema:inLanguage en
39 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
40 schema:isPartOf Nd6e250308acb42ebb794211317795f99
41 Ndb8502d7e1af443db182ab8a8fb377c4
42 sg:journal.1009586
43 schema:name Coping with herbivory: Photosynthetic capacity and resource allocation in two semiarid Agropyron bunchgrasses
44 schema:pagination 14-24
45 schema:productId N2184f6ed032c4f2fa77a8c19b6308278
46 N62ec766ab5b04860a141146c9d161b26
47 Na1cc480d1ce14a899f5e824e6db11b2a
48 Nc60ed4cc5aba4fa7ae34df7d4fc4b45a
49 Nf740de3a82fb43db872d3211b28d3a2d
50 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1049287341
51 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00378790
52 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-15T08:50
53 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
54 schema:sdPublisher Nfbaad1d8c0d346118b2325e7766d2003
55 schema:url http://link.springer.com/10.1007%2FBF00378790
56 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
57 sgo:sdDataset articles
58 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
59 N2184f6ed032c4f2fa77a8c19b6308278 schema:name pubmed_id
60 schema:value 28310058
61 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
62 N62ec766ab5b04860a141146c9d161b26 schema:name nlm_unique_id
63 schema:value 0150372
64 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
65 Na1cc480d1ce14a899f5e824e6db11b2a schema:name doi
66 schema:value 10.1007/bf00378790
67 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
68 Nac938bee18ca47419def2c0df6a0fce0 rdf:first sg:person.0754773040.63
69 rdf:rest Nd1e651186758496fb0b1f19555fe36db
70 Nc472952022a54c3c835ad87eaae717fe rdf:first sg:person.015674413007.69
71 rdf:rest Ne96681f4d5f942cbafa58aa345903980
72 Nc60ed4cc5aba4fa7ae34df7d4fc4b45a schema:name dimensions_id
73 schema:value pub.1049287341
74 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
75 Nccc67a6b57714974acab8771ed4ac03c rdf:first sg:person.013547760707.92
76 rdf:rest rdf:nil
77 Nd1e651186758496fb0b1f19555fe36db rdf:first sg:person.0743207502.31
78 rdf:rest Nc472952022a54c3c835ad87eaae717fe
79 Nd6e250308acb42ebb794211317795f99 schema:issueNumber 1
80 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
81 Ndb8502d7e1af443db182ab8a8fb377c4 schema:volumeNumber 50
82 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
83 Ne96681f4d5f942cbafa58aa345903980 rdf:first sg:person.01044643154.17
84 rdf:rest Nccc67a6b57714974acab8771ed4ac03c
85 Nf740de3a82fb43db872d3211b28d3a2d schema:name readcube_id
86 schema:value eacbc6fd497b3947c9df523b20bd42ef056ef51bc4e051c497e46c77930543e8
87 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
88 Nfbaad1d8c0d346118b2325e7766d2003 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
89 rdf:type schema:Organization
90 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
91 schema:name Biological Sciences
92 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
93 anzsrc-for:0607 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
94 schema:name Plant Biology
95 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
96 sg:journal.1009586 schema:issn 0029-8549
97 1432-1939
98 schema:name Oecologia
99 rdf:type schema:Periodical
100 sg:person.01044643154.17 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c
101 schema:familyName Nowak
102 schema:givenName R. S.
103 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01044643154.17
104 rdf:type schema:Person
105 sg:person.013547760707.92 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c
106 schema:familyName Dzurec
107 schema:givenName R. S.
108 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.013547760707.92
109 rdf:type schema:Person
110 sg:person.015674413007.69 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c
111 schema:familyName Johnson
112 schema:givenName D. A.
113 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.015674413007.69
114 rdf:type schema:Person
115 sg:person.0743207502.31 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c
116 schema:familyName Richards
117 schema:givenName J. H.
118 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0743207502.31
119 rdf:type schema:Person
120 sg:person.0754773040.63 schema:affiliation https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c
121 schema:familyName Caldwell
122 schema:givenName M. M.
123 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0754773040.63
124 rdf:type schema:Person
125 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00332843 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1020689518
126 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00332843
127 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
128 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00346476 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1050293744
129 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00346476
130 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
131 sg:pub.10.1007/bf02860815 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027179894
132 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02860815
133 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
134 https://doi.org/10.1016/0305-1978(77)90007-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1002310988
135 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
136 https://doi.org/10.1016/b978-0-12-774750-7.50028-2 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017106372
137 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
138 https://doi.org/10.1021/ac60111a017 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1055031436
139 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
140 https://doi.org/10.1071/pp9800527 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1034836457
141 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
142 https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.17.4.540 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1014302149
143 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
144 https://doi.org/10.1104/pp.66.1.97 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021023545
145 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
146 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1399-3054.1979.tb03207.x schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017623816
147 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
148 https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.1960.tb06195.x schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033962085
149 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
150 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1265481 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1062470892
151 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
152 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.155.3767.1248 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1062490773
153 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
154 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.161.3842.637 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1062495095
155 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
156 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.165.3891.415 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1062497553
157 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
158 https://doi.org/10.1126/science.198.4322.1177 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1062516158
159 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
160 https://doi.org/10.2134/agronj1978.00021962007000040035x schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1068989933
161 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
162 https://doi.org/10.2307/1550499 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102732113
163 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
164 https://doi.org/10.2307/1550500 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102732107
165 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
166 https://doi.org/10.2307/1930618 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069655151
167 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
168 https://doi.org/10.2307/1932194 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069656582
169 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
170 https://doi.org/10.2307/1932611 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069656947
171 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
172 https://doi.org/10.2307/1934971 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069659140
173 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
174 https://doi.org/10.2307/1942242 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069664722
175 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
176 https://doi.org/10.2307/2402964 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1069912648
177 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
178 https://doi.org/10.2307/3893839 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102530993
179 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
180 https://doi.org/10.2307/3894509 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102530988
181 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
182 https://doi.org/10.2307/3896253 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102532312
183 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
184 https://doi.org/10.2307/3896791 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102532959
185 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
186 https://doi.org/10.2307/3896873 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1102532971
187 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
188 https://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.53857.3c schema:alternateName Utah State University
189 schema:name Department of Range Science, Utah State University, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA
190 USDA-SEA-AR, Crops Research Laboratory, Utah State University UMC 63, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA
191 the Ecology Center, UMC 52, Utah State University, 84322, Logan, Utah, USA
192 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...