Hydrodynamic effects on cells in agitated tissue culture reactors View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

1986-03

AUTHORS

R. S. Cherry, E. T. Papoutsakis

ABSTRACT

Tissue cells are known to be sensitive to mechanical stresses imposed on them by agitation in bioreactors. The amount of agitation provided in a microcarrier or suspension bioreactor should be only enough to provide an effective homogeneity. Three distinct flow regions can be identified in the reactor: bulk turbulent flow, bulk laminar flow, and boundary-layer flows. Possible mechanisms of cell damage are examined by analyzing the motion of microcarriers or free cells relative to the surrounding fluid, to each other, and to moving or stationary solid surfaces. The primary mechanisms of cell damage appear to result from (a) direct interaction between microcarriers and turbulent eddies, (b) collisions between microcarriers in turbulent flow, and (c) collisions against the impeller or other stationary surfaces. If the smallest eddies of turbulent flow are of the same size as the microcarrier beads, they may cause high shear stresses on the cells. Eddies the size of the average interbead spacing may cause bead-bead collisions which damage cells. The severity of the collisions increases when the eddies are also of the same size as the beads. Bead size and the interbead distance are virtually equal in typical microcarrier suspensions. Impeller collisions occur when the beads cannot avoid the impeller leading edge as it advances through the liquid. The implications of the results of this analysis on the design and operation of tissue culture bioreactors are also discussed. More... »

PAGES

29-41

References to SciGraph publications

  • 1984. A High Efficiency Stirrer for Suspension Cell Culture with or without Microcarriers in EUKARYOTIC CELL CULTURES
  • 1974. Transient and oscillatory states of continuous culture in ADVANCES IN BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEERING, VOLUME 3
  • 1983-01. The large-scale cultivation of mammalian cells. in SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN
  • 1981-12. Oxygen demand and supply in cell culture in APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
  • 1984-05-01. Novel Bioreactor Systems and Their Applications in NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY
  • Identifiers

    URI

    http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00369462

    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00369462

    DIMENSIONS

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