Invertebrate introductions in marine habitats: two species of hydromedusae (Cnidaria) native to the Black Sea, Maeotias inexspectata and Blackfordia virginica, ... View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1995-04

AUTHORS

C. E. Mills, F. Sommer

ABSTRACT

The hydrozoans Maeotias inexspectata Ostroumoff, 1896 and Blackfordia virginica Mayer, 1910, believed to be native to the Black Sea (i.e. Sarmatic) and resident in a variety of estuarine habitats worldwide, were found as introduced species in the Petaluma River and Napa River, California, in 1992 and 1993. These rivers are mostly-estuarine tributaries that flow into north San Francisco Bay. Both species appeared to be well-established in this brackishwater habitat. Salinities at the collection sites were about 11‰ during the summer, rising to nearly 20‰ in the early autumn and falling to near 0‰ in the winter. Large numbers of all sizes of both species of medusae were observed and collected, indicating that the hydroid stages of the life cycles of the two are also well-established in these rivers. In the Petaluma River, populations of both species were at maximum in late July, with numbers of individuals declining through August and into September; the Napa River was sampled only in October, and at that time only B. virginica was found. Examination of full guts of M. inexspectata and B. virginica medusae revealed that both species had fed nearly exclusively on small crustaceans, principally barnacle nauplii, copepods and their eggs and nauplii, and crab zoea larvae (M. inexspectata only). All the M. inexspectata medusae were males, indicating that the population has probably developed from the introduction of perhaps only a single male polyp or polyp bud. In spite of its inability to reproduce sexually, this population appears to be maintained by the prodigious ability of the polyp to bud and reproduce asexually, and is fully capable of invading additional low-salinity habitats from its present Petaluma River site. Male and female B. virginica medusae were collected in both the Petaluma River and the Napa River, indicating that B. virginica may have been introduced by either the polyp or medusa stage (or both), but that multiple individuals (of both sexes) must have arrived from another port in one or more invasions. As indicated for M. inexspectata, the B. virginica population will also probably seed new populations in San Francisco Bay and elsewhere. Based on its cnidome as well as the morphology of both medusa and polyp, M. inexspectata has been reclassified by moving it from the family Olindiidae, Limnomedusae, to the family Moerisiidae, Anthomedusae. More... »

PAGES

279-288

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00348941

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00348941

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1086116266


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/05", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Environmental Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0502", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Environmental Science and Management", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0602", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Ecology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, 620 University Road, 98250, Friday Harbot, Washington, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.34477.33", 
          "name": [
            "Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, 620 University Road, 98250, Friday Harbot, Washington, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Mills", 
        "givenName": "C. E.", 
        "id": "sg:person.011505726307.00", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.011505726307.00"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Monterey Bay Aquarium, 886 Cannery Row, 93940-1085, Monterey, California, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/None", 
          "name": [
            "Monterey Bay Aquarium, 886 Cannery Row, 93940-1085, Monterey, California, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Sommer", 
        "givenName": "F.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/180445a0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1051746459", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/180445a0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/222694a0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030623885", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/222694a0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.2307/1351633", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031613216", 
          "https://doi.org/10.2307/1351633"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1995-04", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1995-04-01", 
    "description": "The hydrozoans Maeotias inexspectata Ostroumoff, 1896 and Blackfordia virginica Mayer, 1910, believed to be native to the Black Sea (i.e. Sarmatic) and resident in a variety of estuarine habitats worldwide, were found as introduced species in the Petaluma River and Napa River, California, in 1992 and 1993. These rivers are mostly-estuarine tributaries that flow into north San Francisco Bay. Both species appeared to be well-established in this brackishwater habitat. Salinities at the collection sites were about 11\u2030 during the summer, rising to nearly 20\u2030 in the early autumn and falling to near 0\u2030 in the winter. Large numbers of all sizes of both species of medusae were observed and collected, indicating that the hydroid stages of the life cycles of the two are also well-established in these rivers. In the Petaluma River, populations of both species were at maximum in late July, with numbers of individuals declining through August and into September; the Napa River was sampled only in October, and at that time only B. virginica was found. Examination of full guts of M. inexspectata and B. virginica medusae revealed that both species had fed nearly exclusively on small crustaceans, principally barnacle nauplii, copepods and their eggs and nauplii, and crab zoea larvae (M. inexspectata only). All the M. inexspectata medusae were males, indicating that the population has probably developed from the introduction of perhaps only a single male polyp or polyp bud. In spite of its inability to reproduce sexually, this population appears to be maintained by the prodigious ability of the polyp to bud and reproduce asexually, and is fully capable of invading additional low-salinity habitats from its present Petaluma River site. Male and female B. virginica medusae were collected in both the Petaluma River and the Napa River, indicating that B. virginica may have been introduced by either the polyp or medusa stage (or both), but that multiple individuals (of both sexes) must have arrived from another port in one or more invasions. As indicated for M. inexspectata, the B. virginica population will also probably seed new populations in San Francisco Bay and elsewhere. Based on its cnidome as well as the morphology of both medusa and polyp, M. inexspectata has been reclassified by moving it from the family Olindiidae, Limnomedusae, to the family Moerisiidae, Anthomedusae.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00348941", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1327717", 
        "issn": [
          "0025-3162", 
          "1432-1793"
        ], 
        "name": "Marine Biology", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "2", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "122"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "San Francisco Bay", 
      "Petaluma River", 
      "Napa River", 
      "B. virginica", 
      "North San Francisco Bay", 
      "low-salinity habitats", 
      "Black Sea", 
      "species of hydromedusae", 
      "species of medusae", 
      "invertebrate introductions", 
      "Blackfordia virginica", 
      "estuarine habitats", 
      "marine habitats", 
      "River Site", 
      "number of individuals", 
      "estuarine tributaries", 
      "more invasion", 
      "habitats", 
      "River", 
      "small crustaceans", 
      "collection sites", 
      "new population", 
      "full guts", 
      "male polyps", 
      "hydroid stage", 
      "medusa stage", 
      "early autumn", 
      "species", 
      "barnacle nauplii", 
      "Bay", 
      "polyp buds", 
      "virginica", 
      "zoea larvae", 
      "medusae", 
      "prodigious ability", 
      "multiple individuals", 
      "Sea", 
      "life cycle", 
      "buds", 
      "population", 
      "nauplii", 
      "tributaries", 
      "sites", 
      "copepods", 
      "crustaceans", 
      "salinity", 
      "hydromedusae", 
      "autumn", 
      "Limnomedusae", 
      "Anthomedusae", 
      "summer", 
      "winter", 
      "cnidome", 
      "larvae", 
      "California", 
      "invasion", 
      "eggs", 
      "large number", 
      "gut", 
      "introduction", 
      "stage", 
      "individuals", 
      "cycle", 
      "number", 
      "residents", 
      "variety", 
      "morphology", 
      "males", 
      "ability", 
      "ports", 
      "spite", 
      "inability", 
      "size", 
      "polyps", 
      "maximum", 
      "time", 
      "examination"
    ], 
    "name": "Invertebrate introductions in marine habitats: two species of hydromedusae (Cnidaria) native to the Black Sea, Maeotias inexspectata and Blackfordia virginica, invade San Francisco Bay", 
    "pagination": "279-288", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1086116266"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/bf00348941"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00348941", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1086116266"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-10-01T06:29", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221001/entities/gbq_results/article/article_277.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00348941"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00348941'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00348941'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00348941'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00348941'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

163 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      107 URIs      94 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00348941 schema:about anzsrc-for:05
2 anzsrc-for:0502
3 anzsrc-for:06
4 anzsrc-for:0602
5 schema:author N73577dbcdae14b4da1e39b9ee070be77
6 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1038/180445a0
7 sg:pub.10.1038/222694a0
8 sg:pub.10.2307/1351633
9 schema:datePublished 1995-04
10 schema:datePublishedReg 1995-04-01
11 schema:description The hydrozoans Maeotias inexspectata Ostroumoff, 1896 and Blackfordia virginica Mayer, 1910, believed to be native to the Black Sea (i.e. Sarmatic) and resident in a variety of estuarine habitats worldwide, were found as introduced species in the Petaluma River and Napa River, California, in 1992 and 1993. These rivers are mostly-estuarine tributaries that flow into north San Francisco Bay. Both species appeared to be well-established in this brackishwater habitat. Salinities at the collection sites were about 11‰ during the summer, rising to nearly 20‰ in the early autumn and falling to near 0‰ in the winter. Large numbers of all sizes of both species of medusae were observed and collected, indicating that the hydroid stages of the life cycles of the two are also well-established in these rivers. In the Petaluma River, populations of both species were at maximum in late July, with numbers of individuals declining through August and into September; the Napa River was sampled only in October, and at that time only B. virginica was found. Examination of full guts of M. inexspectata and B. virginica medusae revealed that both species had fed nearly exclusively on small crustaceans, principally barnacle nauplii, copepods and their eggs and nauplii, and crab zoea larvae (M. inexspectata only). All the M. inexspectata medusae were males, indicating that the population has probably developed from the introduction of perhaps only a single male polyp or polyp bud. In spite of its inability to reproduce sexually, this population appears to be maintained by the prodigious ability of the polyp to bud and reproduce asexually, and is fully capable of invading additional low-salinity habitats from its present Petaluma River site. Male and female B. virginica medusae were collected in both the Petaluma River and the Napa River, indicating that B. virginica may have been introduced by either the polyp or medusa stage (or both), but that multiple individuals (of both sexes) must have arrived from another port in one or more invasions. As indicated for M. inexspectata, the B. virginica population will also probably seed new populations in San Francisco Bay and elsewhere. Based on its cnidome as well as the morphology of both medusa and polyp, M. inexspectata has been reclassified by moving it from the family Olindiidae, Limnomedusae, to the family Moerisiidae, Anthomedusae.
12 schema:genre article
13 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
14 schema:isPartOf N1289f4397c7c49e0a3466ac6f4ad78f2
15 N300ab23264bf4c98a570a0976346e766
16 sg:journal.1327717
17 schema:keywords Anthomedusae
18 B. virginica
19 Bay
20 Black Sea
21 Blackfordia virginica
22 California
23 Limnomedusae
24 Napa River
25 North San Francisco Bay
26 Petaluma River
27 River
28 River Site
29 San Francisco Bay
30 Sea
31 ability
32 autumn
33 barnacle nauplii
34 buds
35 cnidome
36 collection sites
37 copepods
38 crustaceans
39 cycle
40 early autumn
41 eggs
42 estuarine habitats
43 estuarine tributaries
44 examination
45 full guts
46 gut
47 habitats
48 hydroid stage
49 hydromedusae
50 inability
51 individuals
52 introduction
53 invasion
54 invertebrate introductions
55 large number
56 larvae
57 life cycle
58 low-salinity habitats
59 male polyps
60 males
61 marine habitats
62 maximum
63 medusa stage
64 medusae
65 more invasion
66 morphology
67 multiple individuals
68 nauplii
69 new population
70 number
71 number of individuals
72 polyp buds
73 polyps
74 population
75 ports
76 prodigious ability
77 residents
78 salinity
79 sites
80 size
81 small crustaceans
82 species
83 species of hydromedusae
84 species of medusae
85 spite
86 stage
87 summer
88 time
89 tributaries
90 variety
91 virginica
92 winter
93 zoea larvae
94 schema:name Invertebrate introductions in marine habitats: two species of hydromedusae (Cnidaria) native to the Black Sea, Maeotias inexspectata and Blackfordia virginica, invade San Francisco Bay
95 schema:pagination 279-288
96 schema:productId N37e73475cff24be09fe995a2716e3000
97 N455c14b978114eab9e7630eba23c5008
98 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1086116266
99 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00348941
100 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-10-01T06:29
101 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
102 schema:sdPublisher N5e26fe3659944e8180001ab26c6e3e59
103 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00348941
104 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
105 sgo:sdDataset articles
106 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
107 N1289f4397c7c49e0a3466ac6f4ad78f2 schema:volumeNumber 122
108 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
109 N300ab23264bf4c98a570a0976346e766 schema:issueNumber 2
110 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
111 N37e73475cff24be09fe995a2716e3000 schema:name dimensions_id
112 schema:value pub.1086116266
113 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
114 N455c14b978114eab9e7630eba23c5008 schema:name doi
115 schema:value 10.1007/bf00348941
116 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
117 N5e26fe3659944e8180001ab26c6e3e59 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
118 rdf:type schema:Organization
119 N73577dbcdae14b4da1e39b9ee070be77 rdf:first sg:person.011505726307.00
120 rdf:rest N9639bc9032eb4ca4b1ab6906a1fedb44
121 N7b308b151966447e8a5988cde9ee3f69 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:None
122 schema:familyName Sommer
123 schema:givenName F.
124 rdf:type schema:Person
125 N9639bc9032eb4ca4b1ab6906a1fedb44 rdf:first N7b308b151966447e8a5988cde9ee3f69
126 rdf:rest rdf:nil
127 anzsrc-for:05 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
128 schema:name Environmental Sciences
129 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
130 anzsrc-for:0502 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
131 schema:name Environmental Science and Management
132 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
133 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
134 schema:name Biological Sciences
135 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
136 anzsrc-for:0602 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
137 schema:name Ecology
138 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
139 sg:journal.1327717 schema:issn 0025-3162
140 1432-1793
141 schema:name Marine Biology
142 schema:publisher Springer Nature
143 rdf:type schema:Periodical
144 sg:person.011505726307.00 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.34477.33
145 schema:familyName Mills
146 schema:givenName C. E.
147 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.011505726307.00
148 rdf:type schema:Person
149 sg:pub.10.1038/180445a0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1051746459
150 https://doi.org/10.1038/180445a0
151 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
152 sg:pub.10.1038/222694a0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1030623885
153 https://doi.org/10.1038/222694a0
154 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
155 sg:pub.10.2307/1351633 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031613216
156 https://doi.org/10.2307/1351633
157 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
158 grid-institutes:None schema:alternateName Monterey Bay Aquarium, 886 Cannery Row, 93940-1085, Monterey, California, USA
159 schema:name Monterey Bay Aquarium, 886 Cannery Row, 93940-1085, Monterey, California, USA
160 rdf:type schema:Organization
161 grid-institutes:grid.34477.33 schema:alternateName Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, 620 University Road, 98250, Friday Harbot, Washington, USA
162 schema:name Friday Harbor Laboratories, University of Washington, 620 University Road, 98250, Friday Harbot, Washington, USA
163 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...