Facultative sex ratio shifts by a herbivorous insect in response to variation in host plant quality View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1992-11

AUTHORS

Timothy P. Craig, Peter W. Price, Joanne K. Itami

ABSTRACT

We tested predictions of sex allocation theory with a series of field experiments on sex allocation in an herbivorous, haplodiploid, sawfly, Euura lasiolepis. Our experiments demonstrated the following points. 1) Adult females allocated progeny sex in response to plant growth. 2) Population sex ratios varied in response to plant quality, being male-biased where plant growth was slow and female-biased where plant growth was rapid. 3) Family sex ratios varied in response to plant quality, being male-biased on slow-growing plants and female-biased on rapidly-growing plants. 4) Female fitness increased more rapidly as the result of developing on more rapidly-growing plants than male mass. We conclude from these results that there are unequal returns on investment in male and female progeny. This results in facultatively biased sawfly sex ratios as an adaptive response to variation in plant quality. More... »

PAGES

153-161

References to SciGraph publications

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00317357

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00317357

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1014055252

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28313044


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