Interspecific acoustic interactions of the neotropical treefrog Hyla ebraccata View Full Text


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Article Info

DATE

1984-03

AUTHORS

Joshua J. Schwartz, Kentwood D. Wells

ABSTRACT

Hyla ebraccata, H. microcephala and H. phlebodes commonly occur together in Panama. The three species have calls exhibiting broad frequency overlap and call during the same season and time of day from similar microhabitats, frequently in close proximity. The vocal repertoires of the three species are structurally and functionally similar. All employ multi-part advertisement and aggressive calls which consist of a primary note followed by a variable number of clicks. H. ebraccata males often responded to heterospecific calls with multi-note synchronized responses, and calls with primary notes greater than 150–200 ms were most effective in eliciting synchrony. Playback experiments with synthetic 1-note advertisement calls of different durations and both synthetic 1-note advertisement calls and 200 ms tones of different frequencies demonstrated that H. ebraccata males will synchronize with stimuli which are similar in frequency and duration to conspecific calls. Data from a two-choice experiment with female H. ebraccata demonstrate that calls of individual H. microcephala can reduce the attractiveness of a H. ebraccata male's calls if primary notes overlap. By synchronizing response calls to those of H. microcephala, a H. ebraccata may reduce the chances that his calls are rendered less attractive to potential mates.Aggressive calls of these species are graded and are characterized by higher pulse repetition rates and often longer durations than advertisement calls. H. ebraccata males respond to aggressive calls of H. microcephala and H. phlebodes as they do to their own calls. Heterospecific aggressive interactions probably occur because the species interfere acoustically. Our results demonstrate that H. ebraccata males behave in ways which enhance their ability to communicate in a noisy assemblage of conspecific and heterospecific males. More... »

PAGES

211-224

References to SciGraph publications

  • 1982-12. Temporal performance roles during vocal interactions in nightingales (Luscinia megarhynchos B.) in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1982-12. Significance of spectral and temporal call parameters in the auditory communication of male grass frogs in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1979-06. Interspecific territoriality in red-breasted meadowlarks and a method for estimating the mutuality of their participation in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1982-10. The role of synchronized calling, ambient light, and ambient noise, in anti-bat-predator behavior of a treefrog in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1981-03. Mating call recognition in the barking treefrog (Hyla gratiosa): Responses to synthetic calls and comparisons with the green treefrog (Hyla cinerea) in JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY A
  • 1981-03. Mating call recognition in the green treefrog (Hyla cinerea): Importance of two frequency bands as a function of sound pressure level in JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY A
  • 1982-09. Behavioral refractory period in neotropical treefrogs in JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY A
  • 1977. Long-Range Acoustic Communication in Anurans: An Integrated and Evolutionary Approach in THE REPRODUCTIVE BIOLOGY OF AMPHIBIANS
  • 1974-03. Analysis of an acoustic pacemaker in Strecker's chorus frog,Pseudacris streckeri (Anura: Hylidae) in JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY A
  • 1978-03. Communicative significance of the two-note call of the treefrogEleutherodactylus coqui in JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY A
  • 1980-09. Behavoral ecology and social organization of a dendrobatid frog (Colostethus inguinalis) in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
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