Non-invasive analysis of metabolic reactions in body tissues, the case of myocardial fatty acids View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1981-05

AUTHORS

L. E. Feinendegen, K. Vyska, Chr. Freundlieb, A. Höck, H. J. Machulla, G. Kloster, G. Stöcklin

ABSTRACT

In vivo observations of metabolic reactions require a) the knowledge of the metabolic pathway involved, b) the proper choice of tracer, c) the proper placement of tracer on to the substrate with respect to its anabolic and catabolic portion, d) counting techniques for separately observing the anabolic and catabolic substrate portion, e) proof of applicability of the method.Fatty acid catabolism may be observed in the myocardium by choosing 123I in the ω-position, thus altering heptadecanoic acid into a stearic acid analogue. This labelled fatty acid is accepted into the metabolic chain of reactions. The kinetics of uptake and release of this tracer, in mouse myocardium, are very similar to that of 11C-labelled palmitic acid.Because the 123I labels both, the anabolic substrate as well as the final catabolites, which are released into the circulating blood and partially reenter the field of view, they must be separately measured in order to observe the release rate of anabolic tracer as a consequence of fatty acid degradation.123I in the form of sodium iodide, was chosen to separately observe the catabolic tracer. The assumption is a diffusion rate constant similar for all types of catabolic tracer, i.e., iodinated small molecular acyl residues and free iodide. The catabolic tracer was substracted from the total tracer to yield the anabolically bound tracer.The application of the correction procedure to separately observe the anabolic tracer in the myocardium combined with ECG-triggering of imaging in diastole, gives excellent myocardial scintigrams and permits the construction of metabolic images giving the rates of release of fatty acid labelling for each image segment of the myocardium. There is evidence that in coronary artery disease accumulation defects show a diminished release rate whereas in cardiomyopathy the accumulation image does not superimpose the metabolic image.In order to utilize emission computer assisted tomography to its full potential one needs an acceptable speed of imaging for measuring elimination rates of tracer; also ECG triggering to any phase of a cardiac cycle should be applicable in order to improve the image quality; and finally repeated images from one or different tracers should be of interest in order to construct functional images giving metabolic reaction rates in term of elimination half times, besides the image of the initial tracer accumulation. In vivo observations of metabolic reactions require a) the knowledge of the metabolic pathway involved, b) the proper choice of tracer, c) the proper placement of tracer on to the substrate with respect to its anabolic and catabolic portion, d) counting techniques for separately observing the anabolic and catabolic substrate portion, e) proof of applicability of the method. Fatty acid catabolism may be observed in the myocardium by choosing 123I in the ω-position, thus altering heptadecanoic acid into a stearic acid analogue. This labelled fatty acid is accepted into the metabolic chain of reactions. The kinetics of uptake and release of this tracer, in mouse myocardium, are very similar to that of 11C-labelled palmitic acid. Because the 123I labels both, the anabolic substrate as well as the final catabolites, which are released into the circulating blood and partially reenter the field of view, they must be separately measured in order to observe the release rate of anabolic tracer as a consequence of fatty acid degradation. 123I in the form of sodium iodide, was chosen to separately observe the catabolic tracer. The assumption is a diffusion rate constant similar for all types of catabolic tracer, i.e., iodinated small molecular acyl residues and free iodide. The catabolic tracer was substracted from the total tracer to yield the anabolically bound tracer. The application of the correction procedure to separately observe the anabolic tracer in the myocardium combined with ECG-triggering of imaging in diastole, gives excellent myocardial scintigrams and permits the construction of metabolic images giving the rates of release of fatty acid labelling for each image segment of the myocardium. There is evidence that in coronary artery disease accumulation defects show a diminished release rate whereas in cardiomyopathy the accumulation image does not superimpose the metabolic image. In order to utilize emission computer assisted tomography to its full potential one needs an acceptable speed of imaging for measuring elimination rates of tracer; also ECG triggering to any phase of a cardiac cycle should be applicable in order to improve the image quality; and finally repeated images from one or different tracers should be of interest in order to construct functional images giving metabolic reaction rates in term of elimination half times, besides the image of the initial tracer accumulation. More... »

PAGES

191-200

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00290563

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00290563

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1017491272

PUBMED

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7250136


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