The interaction of rockphosphate, Bradyrhizobium, vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae and phosphate-solubilizing microbes on soybean grown in a sub-Himalayan mollisol View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1993-10

AUTHORS

H. P. Singh, T. A. Singh

ABSTRACT

A factorial design 23 × 4 with two levels of Mussorie rockphosphate (RP) with or without vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and Bradyrhizobium japonicum, and four treatments of phosphate-solubilizing microbes (PSM) Pseudomonas striata, Bacillus polymyxa, Aspergillus awamori was employed using Patharchatta sandy loam soil (Typic Hapludoll). The observations included mycorrhization, nodulation, grain and straw yield, N and P uptake, available soil P and the PSM population in the soil after crop harvest. Inoculation with endophytes alone caused about 70% root colonization. Addition of rockphosphate or inoculation with PSM, except B. polymyxa, stimulated root infection of native as well as introduced VAM endophytes. Application of RP or inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum, mycorrhizal fungi or phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms significantly increased nodulation, N uptake, available soil P and the PSM population in the soil after the crop harvest. The grain and straw yields did not increase following RP addition or mycorrhizal inoculation but increased significantly after inoculation wit Bradyrhizobium or PSM. In general, the application of RP, Bradyrhizobium, VAM and PSM in combinations of any two or three resulted in significant increases in nodulation, plant growth, grain yield and uptake of N and P. Among the four factor interactions, rockphosphate, Bradyrhizobium and P. striata in the absence of VAM resulted in maximal nodulation, grain and straw yields and N uptake by soybean. The highest P uptake by soybean grain was recorded with Bradyrhizobium and A. awamori in the absence of rockphosphate and VAM. Generally, available soil P and PSM population after crop harvest were not significantly increased by the treatment combinations giving the maximal uptake of nutrients. However, they increased significantly in response to PSM, which produced no significant increase in total uptake of nutrients. More... »

PAGES

37-43

References to SciGraph publications

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00203249

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00203249

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011254571


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