Selective males and ardent females in pipefishes View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1993-05

AUTHORS

Anders Berglund, Gunilla Rosenqvist

ABSTRACT

In the pipefishes Syngnathus typhle and Nerophis ophidion, males have been shown to limit female reproductive rate, and females to compete for access to males. Hence, these species fit the criteria for sex-role reversal. Males brood the eggs and provide the offspring with nutrients, oxygen and an osmoregulated environment. Moreover, in S. typhle both sexes prefer a larger mate when given a choice. Sexual selection theory predicts that males should be more “choosy” than females, and that was experimentally demonstrated in this study. We predicted that S. typhle males should be less eager to copulate than S. typhle females with an unattractive (i.e. small) mate. We measured eagerness as the time from the start of the experiment until copulation occurred. Males with unattractive partners took significantly longer to copulate than females with unattractive partners. Moreover, females invariably initiated the courtship dance, and resumed it quicker after copulation than did the males, again suggesting “reproductive hesitation” in males. Neither male nor female size per se was correlated with time until copulation. In N. ophidion, where we have previously shown that males prefer larger to smaller females, we found that females did not select males with regard to size. Our results are consistent both with earlier findings (males limit female reproduction and females compete for males) and with operational sex ratios in nature: in seven annual field samples in June, the numbers of S. typhle females with ripe eggs always significantly exceeded numbers of receptive males. Hence, the potential cost of being choosy in terms of lost matings is much higher in females than in males. In conclusion, S. typhle females were somewhat choosy, but less so than males, whereas N. ophidion females were not choosy at all. More... »

PAGES

331-336

References to SciGraph publications

  • 1989-05. Why do males of the dance flyEmpis borealis refuse to mate? The importance of female age and size in JOURNAL OF INSECT BEHAVIOR
  • 1991-05. Sexual selection and the potential reproductive rates of males and females in NATURE
  • 1990-07. Nuptial feeding in tettigoniids male costs and the rates of fecundity increase in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1990-04. Male backspace availability in the giant waterbug (Belostoma flumineum Say) in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1989-12. Breeding strategy of the male brooding water bug,Diplonychus major esaki (Heteroptera: Belostomatidae): Is male back space limiting? in JOURNAL OF ETHOLOGY
  • 1990-07. Experimental reversal of courtship roles in an insect in NATURE
  • 1990-08. Male limitation of female reproductive success in a pipefish: effects of body-size differences in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1986-09. Mate choice, fecundity and sexual dimorphism in two pipefish species (Syngnathidae) in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1989-09. Is male back space limiting? An investigation into the reproductive demography of the giant water bug,Abedus indentatus (Heteroptera: Belostomatidae) in JOURNAL OF INSECT BEHAVIOR
  • 1986-02. Sexual selection and spring arrival times of red-necked and Wilson's phalaropes in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1988-03. Sex ratios and intrasexual competition for mates in a sex-role reversed shorebird, Wilson's phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor) in BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY AND SOCIOBIOLOGY
  • 1985-05. Social and reproductive behavior of three mouthbrooding cardinalfishes, Apogon doederleini, A. niger and A. notatus in ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OF FISHES
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    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00183788

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