Methyl palmitate does not elicit invasion of honeybee brood cells by Varroa mites View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle      Open Access: True


Article Info

DATE

1994-10

AUTHORS

Willem J. Boot

ABSTRACT

Since Varroa mites decide at some distance from the larva whether to stay on a bee or invade a cell, they may well use a volatile chemical to select a brood cell. A few aliphatic esters, predominantly methyl palmitate, have been claimed to be this volatile signal for the mites for two reasons. The mites respond to the esters in an olfactometer (Le Conte et al., 1989), and the levels of the esters in worker and drone larvae may explain that drone cells are attractive during a longer period and are invaded more frequently than worker cells (Trouiller et al., 1992). However, invasion itsclf appeared to be unaffected by application of methyl palmitate to brood cells. In addition, analysis of the volatiles emanating from attractive brood cells showed hundreds of components in the volatile blend, but in only 2 of 17 analyses a trace of methyl palmitate was found. Hence, there is no reason to believe that methyl palmitate is used as a signal for invasion by the mites. More... »

PAGES

587-592

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00051721

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00051721

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1040017989


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/06", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biological Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0601", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Biochemistry and Cell Biology", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Department of Entomology, Wageningen Agricultural University, P.O.B. 8031, 6700 EH, Wageningen, The Netherlands", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.4818.5", 
          "name": [
            "Department of Pure and Applied Ecology, section Population Biology, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM, Amsterdam, The Netherlands", 
            "Department of Entomology, Wageningen Agricultural University, P.O.B. 8031, 6700 EH, Wageningen, The Netherlands"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Boot", 
        "givenName": "Willem J.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01064472501.65", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01064472501.65"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1051/apido:19930108", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027542477", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1051/apido:19930108"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00981926", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007095271", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00981926"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00116318", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033492347", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00116318"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf01021772", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1000866602", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01021772"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf01138390", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1022881580", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01138390"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1051/apido:19880406", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1044627017", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1051/apido:19880406"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf01218571", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045344990", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01218571"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf01131612", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1000499522", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01131612"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1994-10", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1994-10-01", 
    "description": "Since Varroa mites decide at some distance from the larva whether to stay on a bee or invade a cell, they may well use a volatile chemical to select a brood cell. A few aliphatic esters, predominantly methyl palmitate, have been claimed to be this volatile signal for the mites for two reasons. The mites respond to the esters in an olfactometer (Le Conte et al., 1989), and the levels of the esters in worker and drone larvae may explain that drone cells are attractive during a longer period and are invaded more frequently than worker cells (Trouiller et al., 1992). However, invasion itsclf appeared to be unaffected by application of methyl palmitate to brood cells. In addition, analysis of the volatiles emanating from attractive brood cells showed hundreds of components in the volatile blend, but in only 2 of 17 analyses a trace of methyl palmitate was found. Hence, there is no reason to believe that methyl palmitate is used as a signal for invasion by the mites.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00051721", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": true, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1095586", 
        "issn": [
          "0168-8162", 
          "1572-9702"
        ], 
        "name": "Experimental and Applied Acarology", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "10", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "18"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "brood cells", 
      "Varroa mites", 
      "honeybee brood cells", 
      "volatile signals", 
      "worker cells", 
      "volatile blends", 
      "drone larvae", 
      "drone cells", 
      "mites", 
      "larvae", 
      "volatile chemicals", 
      "cells", 
      "invasion", 
      "methyl palmitate", 
      "palmitate", 
      "bees", 
      "olfactometer", 
      "hundreds of components", 
      "signals", 
      "esters", 
      "volatiles", 
      "hundreds", 
      "long period", 
      "analysis", 
      "chemicals", 
      "components", 
      "levels", 
      "addition", 
      "aliphatic esters", 
      "distance", 
      "period", 
      "reasons", 
      "applications", 
      "traces", 
      "workers", 
      "blends"
    ], 
    "name": "Methyl palmitate does not elicit invasion of honeybee brood cells by Varroa mites", 
    "pagination": "587-592", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1040017989"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/bf00051721"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00051721", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1040017989"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-05-20T07:19", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220519/entities/gbq_results/article/article_259.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00051721"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00051721'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00051721'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00051721'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00051721'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

127 TRIPLES      22 PREDICATES      70 URIs      54 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00051721 schema:about anzsrc-for:06
2 anzsrc-for:0601
3 schema:author N07c06b256d1848c389325d02ec206c75
4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/bf00116318
5 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00981926
6 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01021772
7 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01131612
8 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01138390
9 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01218571
10 sg:pub.10.1051/apido:19880406
11 sg:pub.10.1051/apido:19930108
12 schema:datePublished 1994-10
13 schema:datePublishedReg 1994-10-01
14 schema:description Since Varroa mites decide at some distance from the larva whether to stay on a bee or invade a cell, they may well use a volatile chemical to select a brood cell. A few aliphatic esters, predominantly methyl palmitate, have been claimed to be this volatile signal for the mites for two reasons. The mites respond to the esters in an olfactometer (Le Conte et al., 1989), and the levels of the esters in worker and drone larvae may explain that drone cells are attractive during a longer period and are invaded more frequently than worker cells (Trouiller et al., 1992). However, invasion itsclf appeared to be unaffected by application of methyl palmitate to brood cells. In addition, analysis of the volatiles emanating from attractive brood cells showed hundreds of components in the volatile blend, but in only 2 of 17 analyses a trace of methyl palmitate was found. Hence, there is no reason to believe that methyl palmitate is used as a signal for invasion by the mites.
15 schema:genre article
16 schema:inLanguage en
17 schema:isAccessibleForFree true
18 schema:isPartOf N4f021c88b50d4bf988ec8e97c7ab8a33
19 Ne65c4cf2147e4014b418ddab673bb842
20 sg:journal.1095586
21 schema:keywords Varroa mites
22 addition
23 aliphatic esters
24 analysis
25 applications
26 bees
27 blends
28 brood cells
29 cells
30 chemicals
31 components
32 distance
33 drone cells
34 drone larvae
35 esters
36 honeybee brood cells
37 hundreds
38 hundreds of components
39 invasion
40 larvae
41 levels
42 long period
43 methyl palmitate
44 mites
45 olfactometer
46 palmitate
47 period
48 reasons
49 signals
50 traces
51 volatile blends
52 volatile chemicals
53 volatile signals
54 volatiles
55 worker cells
56 workers
57 schema:name Methyl palmitate does not elicit invasion of honeybee brood cells by Varroa mites
58 schema:pagination 587-592
59 schema:productId N4c9846a6f9b0499299d4e1e617e7f7e4
60 Ne7fddc686f4147df89d28b05f8ade1ef
61 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1040017989
62 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00051721
63 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-05-20T07:19
64 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
65 schema:sdPublisher N9783ed7c7cb5471d83f988a09f98e2cb
66 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00051721
67 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
68 sgo:sdDataset articles
69 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
70 N07c06b256d1848c389325d02ec206c75 rdf:first sg:person.01064472501.65
71 rdf:rest rdf:nil
72 N4c9846a6f9b0499299d4e1e617e7f7e4 schema:name doi
73 schema:value 10.1007/bf00051721
74 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
75 N4f021c88b50d4bf988ec8e97c7ab8a33 schema:issueNumber 10
76 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
77 N9783ed7c7cb5471d83f988a09f98e2cb schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
78 rdf:type schema:Organization
79 Ne65c4cf2147e4014b418ddab673bb842 schema:volumeNumber 18
80 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
81 Ne7fddc686f4147df89d28b05f8ade1ef schema:name dimensions_id
82 schema:value pub.1040017989
83 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
84 anzsrc-for:06 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
85 schema:name Biological Sciences
86 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
87 anzsrc-for:0601 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
88 schema:name Biochemistry and Cell Biology
89 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
90 sg:journal.1095586 schema:issn 0168-8162
91 1572-9702
92 schema:name Experimental and Applied Acarology
93 schema:publisher Springer Nature
94 rdf:type schema:Periodical
95 sg:person.01064472501.65 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.4818.5
96 schema:familyName Boot
97 schema:givenName Willem J.
98 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01064472501.65
99 rdf:type schema:Person
100 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00116318 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1033492347
101 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00116318
102 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
103 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00981926 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1007095271
104 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00981926
105 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
106 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01021772 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1000866602
107 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01021772
108 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
109 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01131612 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1000499522
110 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01131612
111 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
112 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01138390 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1022881580
113 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01138390
114 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
115 sg:pub.10.1007/bf01218571 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045344990
116 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf01218571
117 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
118 sg:pub.10.1051/apido:19880406 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1044627017
119 https://doi.org/10.1051/apido:19880406
120 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
121 sg:pub.10.1051/apido:19930108 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027542477
122 https://doi.org/10.1051/apido:19930108
123 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
124 grid-institutes:grid.4818.5 schema:alternateName Department of Entomology, Wageningen Agricultural University, P.O.B. 8031, 6700 EH, Wageningen, The Netherlands
125 schema:name Department of Entomology, Wageningen Agricultural University, P.O.B. 8031, 6700 EH, Wageningen, The Netherlands
126 Department of Pure and Applied Ecology, section Population Biology, University of Amsterdam, Kruislaan 320, 1098 SM, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
127 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...