Re-sorption of organic compounds by roots of Zea mays L. and its consequences in the rhizosphere View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1993-06

AUTHORS

D. L. Jones, P. R. Darrah

ABSTRACT

The exudation of soluble carbon compounds from Zea mays roots was investigated over a 10 day growth period under sterile and non-sterile solution culture conditions. The results showed that plants grown in sterile static solution culture, where C was allowed to accumulate, released 8 times less C than plants grown under culture conditions in which the solutions were replaced daily.The increased C loss from plant cultures in which exudates were removed daily was attributable to, (a) the reduced potential for root re-sorption of previously lost C, and (b), increasing diffusion gradients between the root and the surrounding bathing solution increasing passive leakage of exudates from the roots. In treatments where C was removed daily from the root-bathing solution, 86% of the total C lost was of a soluble low molecular weight nature, whereas, in sterile and non-sterile static cultures, allowing the accumulation of C over 10 days, this was reduced to 67.5 and 48% respectively.The main C fluxes operating in a solution culture system (efflux and influx of C by both roots and microorganisms) were examined using a computer simulation model to describe movement of soluble sugar-C in both sterile and non-sterile conditions. In sterile static cultures where C was allowed to accumulate in solution over a 10 day growth period, 98% of the C exuded was re-absorbed by the plant. Where C was removed daily from the root-bathing solution this was reduced to 86%. The predicted patterns of C accumulation were similar to those found in the experiments. Simulations showed that the pattern of accumulation and final equilibrium concentrations were dependent on the rate of exudation, the spatial characteristics of exudation, solution volume, root growth rate and the presence of a microbial population. Simulations under non-sterile conditions showed that roots can compete with microorganisms for exudates in solution indicating the possible importance of re-sorption in a soil environment.The results clearly indicate that roots are capable of regulating the net amount of C released into a solution culture with the amount of C collected being highly dependent on the experimental conditions employed. The possible implications of soluble C influx on processes operating within the rhizosphere and in experimental systems is discussed. More... »

PAGES

47-59

References to SciGraph publications

  • 1991-04. Mobilization of cadmium and other metals from two soils by root exudates of Zea mays L., Nicotiana tabacum L. and Nicotiana rustica L. in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1987-10. Rates of rhizodeposition and ammonium depletion in the rhizosphere of axenic oat roots in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1992-06. Re-sorption of organic components by roots of Zea mays L. and its consequences in the rhizosphere in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1986-02. Plant-induced changes in the rhizosphere of maize and wheat in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1991-07. Permeabilization of the plasmalemma and wall of soybean root cells to macromolecules in PLANTA
  • 1972-02. Root exudates of plants in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1985-06. Quantitative estimation of root exudation of maize plants in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1986. The Rhizosphere in NONE
  • 1990-09. Root exudation and rhizoplane bacterial abundance of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) in relation to nitrogen fertilization and root growth in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1983-10. Isolation, purification and chemical composition of maize root cap slime in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1991-06. Models of the rhizosphere in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1979-10. Excretion products of maize roots from seedling to seed development stage in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1992-01. Uptake of a microbially-produced vitamin (B12) by soybean roots in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1991-01. The role of phytosiderophores in acquisition of iron and other micronutrients in graminaceous species: An ecological approach in PLANT AND SOIL
  • 1992-02. Quantitative evaluation of the role of organic acid exudation in the mobilization of rock phosphate by rape in PLANT AND SOIL
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    DOI

    http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00010543

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