Growth and nutrient status of citrus plants as influenced by mycorrhiza and phosphorus application View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1991-02

AUTHORS

V. Antunes, E. J. B. N. Cardoso

ABSTRACT

To test the hypothesis that high levels of soluble phosphate applied in combination with VAM fungi, to citrus plants, can cause growth depression even in the absence of other limiting factors, and also to test if rock phosphate, under these conditions, may be a satisfactory P source, a greenhouse experiment was conducted using sterilized soil with four levels of phosphate (0, 50, 100 and 200 ppm P) supplied either as soluble P or as rock phosphate. Citrus seedlings were either inoculated with the vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungus Glomus etunicatum or left uninoculated. Six months after the start of the experiment, the plants were harvested and shoot dry weight, P and K uptake, root colonization and the number of spores in 50 cm3 of soil were determined. Significant increases were found in dry matter yields and in P and K contents, due to VAM fungus inoculation, at the zero and 50 ppm soluble P levels and at all rock phosphate levels. At 100 ppm soluble P, the development of VAM plants was equilvalent to that of non-VAM plants, and at 200 ppm, growth was significantly less than that of non-VAM plants. Root colonization and sporulation were reduced at higher P levels. The absolute growth depression of VAM plants at the higher P level was likely due to P toxicity. In addition, high leaf P and K concentrations may have interfered with carbohydrate distribution and utilization in these symbioses. Rock phosphate may be used with VAM citrus to substitute for medium amounts of soluble phosphate. More... »

PAGES

11-19

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00010415

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00010415

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1018209327


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