The role of water exchange between a stream channel and its hyporheic zone in nitrogen cycling at the terrestrial-aquatic interface View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:ScholarlyArticle     


Article Info

DATE

1993-02

AUTHORS

Frank J. Triska, John H. Duff, Ronald J. Avanzino

ABSTRACT

The subsurface riparian zone was examined as an ecotone with two interfaces. Inland is a terrestrial boundary, where transport of water and dissolved solutes is toward the channel and controlled by watershed hydrology. Streamside is an aquatic boundary, where exchange of surface water and dissolved solutes is bi-directional and flux is strongly influenced by channel hydraulics. Streamside, bi-directional exchange of water was qualitatively defined using biologically conservative tracers in a third order stream. In several experiments, penetration of surface water extended 18 m inland. Travel time of water from the channel to bankside sediments was highly variable. Subsurface chemical gradients were indirectly related to the travel time. Sites with long travel times tended to be low in nitrate and DO (dissolved oxygen) but high in ammonium and DOC (dissolved organic carbon). Sites with short travel times tended to be high in nitrate and DO but low in ammonium and DOC. Ammonium concentration of interstitial water also was influenced by sorption-desorption processes that involved clay minerals in hyporheic sediments. Denitrification potential in subsurface sediments increased with distance from the channel, and was limited by nitrate at inland sites and by DO in the channel sediments. Conversely, nitrification potential decreased with distance from the channel, and was limited by DO at inland sites and by ammonium at channel locations. Advection of water and dissolved oxygen away from the channel resulted in an oxidized subsurface habitat equivalent to that previously defined as the hyporheic zone. The hyporheic zone is viewed as stream habitat because of its high proportion of surface water and the occurrence of channel organisms. Beyond the channel's hydrologic exchange zone, interstitial water is often chemically reduced. Interstitial water that has not previously entered the channel, groundwater, is viewed as a terrestrial component of the riparian ecotone. Thus, surface water habitats may extend under riparian vegetation, and terrestrial groundwater habitats may be found beneath the stream channel. More... »

PAGES

167-184

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00007177

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/bf00007177

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1010759764


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/04", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Earth Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0406", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd. MS 496, 94025, Menlo Park, CA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.2865.9", 
          "name": [
            "U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd. MS 496, 94025, Menlo Park, CA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Triska", 
        "givenName": "Frank J.", 
        "id": "sg:person.0675310104.92", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0675310104.92"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd. MS 496, 94025, Menlo Park, CA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.2865.9", 
          "name": [
            "U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd. MS 496, 94025, Menlo Park, CA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Duff", 
        "givenName": "John H.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01013626550.35", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01013626550.35"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd. MS 496, 94025, Menlo Park, CA, USA", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.2865.9", 
          "name": [
            "U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd. MS 496, 94025, Menlo Park, CA, USA"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Avanzino", 
        "givenName": "Ronald J.", 
        "id": "sg:person.015502727045.04", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.015502727045.04"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "citation": [
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf02275265", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027880068", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02275265"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/325341a0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038626626", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/325341a0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1038/335064a0", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1046804352", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1038/335064a0"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00014870", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031536781", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00014870"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00026829", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1012056180", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00026829"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4613-3775-1_13", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011253455", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-3775-1_13"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00005821", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041974608", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00005821"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4684-5392-8_21", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021647148", 
          "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-5392-8_21"
        ], 
        "type": "CreativeWork"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1993-02", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1993-02-01", 
    "description": "The subsurface riparian zone was examined as an ecotone with two interfaces. Inland is a terrestrial boundary, where transport of water and dissolved solutes is toward the channel and controlled by watershed hydrology. Streamside is an aquatic boundary, where exchange of surface water and dissolved solutes is bi-directional and flux is strongly influenced by channel hydraulics. Streamside, bi-directional exchange of water was qualitatively defined using biologically conservative tracers in a third order stream. In several experiments, penetration of surface water extended 18 m inland. Travel time of water from the channel to bankside sediments was highly variable. Subsurface chemical gradients were indirectly related to the travel time. Sites with long travel times tended to be low in nitrate and DO (dissolved oxygen) but high in ammonium and DOC (dissolved organic carbon). Sites with short travel times tended to be high in nitrate and DO but low in ammonium and DOC. Ammonium concentration of interstitial water also was influenced by sorption-desorption processes that involved clay minerals in hyporheic sediments. Denitrification potential in subsurface sediments increased with distance from the channel, and was limited by nitrate at inland sites and by DO in the channel sediments. Conversely, nitrification potential decreased with distance from the channel, and was limited by DO at inland sites and by ammonium at channel locations. Advection of water and dissolved oxygen away from the channel resulted in an oxidized subsurface habitat equivalent to that previously defined as the hyporheic zone. The hyporheic zone is viewed as stream habitat because of its high proportion of surface water and the occurrence of channel organisms. Beyond the channel's hydrologic exchange zone, interstitial water is often chemically reduced. Interstitial water that has not previously entered the channel, groundwater, is viewed as a terrestrial component of the riparian ecotone. Thus, surface water habitats may extend under riparian vegetation, and terrestrial groundwater habitats may be found beneath the stream channel.", 
    "genre": "article", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/bf00007177", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": [
      {
        "id": "sg:journal.1023171", 
        "issn": [
          "1037-0544", 
          "1573-5117"
        ], 
        "name": "Hydrobiologia", 
        "publisher": "Springer Nature", 
        "type": "Periodical"
      }, 
      {
        "issueNumber": "1-3", 
        "type": "PublicationIssue"
      }, 
      {
        "type": "PublicationVolume", 
        "volumeNumber": "251"
      }
    ], 
    "keywords": [
      "hyporheic zone", 
      "interstitial water", 
      "surface water", 
      "stream channels", 
      "inland sites", 
      "dissolved solutes", 
      "advection of water", 
      "terrestrial-aquatic interface", 
      "travel time", 
      "surface water habitats", 
      "third-order stream", 
      "channel sediments", 
      "subsurface sediments", 
      "watershed hydrology", 
      "hyporheic sediments", 
      "terrestrial boundary", 
      "conservative tracer", 
      "terrestrial components", 
      "riparian zones", 
      "transport of water", 
      "clay minerals", 
      "water exchange", 
      "riparian vegetation", 
      "exchange zone", 
      "sediments", 
      "order streams", 
      "channel hydraulics", 
      "riparian ecotones", 
      "bi-directional exchange", 
      "denitrification potential", 
      "aquatic boundaries", 
      "long travel times", 
      "channel locations", 
      "nitrogen cycling", 
      "shortest travel time", 
      "groundwater habitats", 
      "zone", 
      "sorption-desorption processes", 
      "stream habitat", 
      "chemical gradients", 
      "ammonium concentrations", 
      "DOC", 
      "water", 
      "water habitats", 
      "nitrification potential", 
      "ecotone", 
      "nitrate", 
      "ammonium", 
      "hydrology", 
      "groundwater", 
      "advection", 
      "inland", 
      "boundaries", 
      "minerals", 
      "DO", 
      "habitats", 
      "sites", 
      "vegetation", 
      "tracer", 
      "flux", 
      "exchange", 
      "hydraulics", 
      "streamside", 
      "cycling", 
      "streams", 
      "solutes", 
      "transport", 
      "channels", 
      "gradient", 
      "occurrence", 
      "location", 
      "distance", 
      "equivalent", 
      "higher proportion", 
      "time", 
      "concentration", 
      "oxygen", 
      "process", 
      "interface", 
      "potential", 
      "components", 
      "organisms", 
      "penetration", 
      "proportion", 
      "experiments", 
      "role"
    ], 
    "name": "The role of water exchange between a stream channel and its hyporheic zone in nitrogen cycling at the terrestrial-aquatic interface", 
    "pagination": "167-184", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1010759764"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/bf00007177"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00007177", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1010759764"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "articles", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-12-01T06:20", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20221201/entities/gbq_results/article/article_243.jsonl", 
    "type": "ScholarlyArticle", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00007177"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00007177'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00007177'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00007177'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/bf00007177'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

189 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      119 URIs      103 LITERALS      6 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00007177 schema:about anzsrc-for:04
2 anzsrc-for:0406
3 schema:author Nb5f0f46280e44d34bca2454deeaef8a9
4 schema:citation sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4613-3775-1_13
5 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4684-5392-8_21
6 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00005821
7 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00014870
8 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00026829
9 sg:pub.10.1007/bf02275265
10 sg:pub.10.1038/325341a0
11 sg:pub.10.1038/335064a0
12 schema:datePublished 1993-02
13 schema:datePublishedReg 1993-02-01
14 schema:description The subsurface riparian zone was examined as an ecotone with two interfaces. Inland is a terrestrial boundary, where transport of water and dissolved solutes is toward the channel and controlled by watershed hydrology. Streamside is an aquatic boundary, where exchange of surface water and dissolved solutes is bi-directional and flux is strongly influenced by channel hydraulics. Streamside, bi-directional exchange of water was qualitatively defined using biologically conservative tracers in a third order stream. In several experiments, penetration of surface water extended 18 m inland. Travel time of water from the channel to bankside sediments was highly variable. Subsurface chemical gradients were indirectly related to the travel time. Sites with long travel times tended to be low in nitrate and DO (dissolved oxygen) but high in ammonium and DOC (dissolved organic carbon). Sites with short travel times tended to be high in nitrate and DO but low in ammonium and DOC. Ammonium concentration of interstitial water also was influenced by sorption-desorption processes that involved clay minerals in hyporheic sediments. Denitrification potential in subsurface sediments increased with distance from the channel, and was limited by nitrate at inland sites and by DO in the channel sediments. Conversely, nitrification potential decreased with distance from the channel, and was limited by DO at inland sites and by ammonium at channel locations. Advection of water and dissolved oxygen away from the channel resulted in an oxidized subsurface habitat equivalent to that previously defined as the hyporheic zone. The hyporheic zone is viewed as stream habitat because of its high proportion of surface water and the occurrence of channel organisms. Beyond the channel's hydrologic exchange zone, interstitial water is often chemically reduced. Interstitial water that has not previously entered the channel, groundwater, is viewed as a terrestrial component of the riparian ecotone. Thus, surface water habitats may extend under riparian vegetation, and terrestrial groundwater habitats may be found beneath the stream channel.
15 schema:genre article
16 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
17 schema:isPartOf N39eb04f578a746a891560a1a7e079a85
18 Nc9f125b1bd274ca9a9d08d43522eed7a
19 sg:journal.1023171
20 schema:keywords DO
21 DOC
22 advection
23 advection of water
24 ammonium
25 ammonium concentrations
26 aquatic boundaries
27 bi-directional exchange
28 boundaries
29 channel hydraulics
30 channel locations
31 channel sediments
32 channels
33 chemical gradients
34 clay minerals
35 components
36 concentration
37 conservative tracer
38 cycling
39 denitrification potential
40 dissolved solutes
41 distance
42 ecotone
43 equivalent
44 exchange
45 exchange zone
46 experiments
47 flux
48 gradient
49 groundwater
50 groundwater habitats
51 habitats
52 higher proportion
53 hydraulics
54 hydrology
55 hyporheic sediments
56 hyporheic zone
57 inland
58 inland sites
59 interface
60 interstitial water
61 location
62 long travel times
63 minerals
64 nitrate
65 nitrification potential
66 nitrogen cycling
67 occurrence
68 order streams
69 organisms
70 oxygen
71 penetration
72 potential
73 process
74 proportion
75 riparian ecotones
76 riparian vegetation
77 riparian zones
78 role
79 sediments
80 shortest travel time
81 sites
82 solutes
83 sorption-desorption processes
84 stream channels
85 stream habitat
86 streams
87 streamside
88 subsurface sediments
89 surface water
90 surface water habitats
91 terrestrial boundary
92 terrestrial components
93 terrestrial-aquatic interface
94 third-order stream
95 time
96 tracer
97 transport
98 transport of water
99 travel time
100 vegetation
101 water
102 water exchange
103 water habitats
104 watershed hydrology
105 zone
106 schema:name The role of water exchange between a stream channel and its hyporheic zone in nitrogen cycling at the terrestrial-aquatic interface
107 schema:pagination 167-184
108 schema:productId N7c5624bb5f76494a853ab9ce3b3af981
109 Nb72e1895f3ea49abb302e00f19a07c92
110 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1010759764
111 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00007177
112 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-12-01T06:20
113 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
114 schema:sdPublisher Nedf5a4cafa2a4a239373797dd62131ed
115 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00007177
116 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
117 sgo:sdDataset articles
118 rdf:type schema:ScholarlyArticle
119 N32a93cbf3ce14588ae0cf8b3a7e9c57f rdf:first sg:person.01013626550.35
120 rdf:rest Nfc2931b36a8540f4b0e76ed561e2bed4
121 N39eb04f578a746a891560a1a7e079a85 schema:volumeNumber 251
122 rdf:type schema:PublicationVolume
123 N7c5624bb5f76494a853ab9ce3b3af981 schema:name doi
124 schema:value 10.1007/bf00007177
125 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
126 Nb5f0f46280e44d34bca2454deeaef8a9 rdf:first sg:person.0675310104.92
127 rdf:rest N32a93cbf3ce14588ae0cf8b3a7e9c57f
128 Nb72e1895f3ea49abb302e00f19a07c92 schema:name dimensions_id
129 schema:value pub.1010759764
130 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
131 Nc9f125b1bd274ca9a9d08d43522eed7a schema:issueNumber 1-3
132 rdf:type schema:PublicationIssue
133 Nedf5a4cafa2a4a239373797dd62131ed schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
134 rdf:type schema:Organization
135 Nfc2931b36a8540f4b0e76ed561e2bed4 rdf:first sg:person.015502727045.04
136 rdf:rest rdf:nil
137 anzsrc-for:04 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
138 schema:name Earth Sciences
139 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
140 anzsrc-for:0406 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
141 schema:name Physical Geography and Environmental Geoscience
142 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
143 sg:journal.1023171 schema:issn 1037-0544
144 1573-5117
145 schema:name Hydrobiologia
146 schema:publisher Springer Nature
147 rdf:type schema:Periodical
148 sg:person.01013626550.35 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.2865.9
149 schema:familyName Duff
150 schema:givenName John H.
151 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01013626550.35
152 rdf:type schema:Person
153 sg:person.015502727045.04 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.2865.9
154 schema:familyName Avanzino
155 schema:givenName Ronald J.
156 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.015502727045.04
157 rdf:type schema:Person
158 sg:person.0675310104.92 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.2865.9
159 schema:familyName Triska
160 schema:givenName Frank J.
161 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.0675310104.92
162 rdf:type schema:Person
163 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4613-3775-1_13 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1011253455
164 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4613-3775-1_13
165 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
166 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-4684-5392-8_21 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1021647148
167 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-5392-8_21
168 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
169 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00005821 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1041974608
170 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00005821
171 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
172 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00014870 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1031536781
173 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00014870
174 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
175 sg:pub.10.1007/bf00026829 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1012056180
176 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00026829
177 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
178 sg:pub.10.1007/bf02275265 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1027880068
179 https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02275265
180 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
181 sg:pub.10.1038/325341a0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038626626
182 https://doi.org/10.1038/325341a0
183 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
184 sg:pub.10.1038/335064a0 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1046804352
185 https://doi.org/10.1038/335064a0
186 rdf:type schema:CreativeWork
187 grid-institutes:grid.2865.9 schema:alternateName U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd. MS 496, 94025, Menlo Park, CA, USA
188 schema:name U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd. MS 496, 94025, Menlo Park, CA, USA
189 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...