Tamil Nadu Migrants in the Gulf View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2019-10-11

AUTHORS

S. Irudaya Rajan , E. Sownthara Rajan

ABSTRACT

Tamil Nadu migration survey 2015 was conducted to collect the migration data for Tamil Nadu and understand its impact as the series of Kerala migration surveys helped Government of Kerala in framing policies based on the results. Tamil Nadu migration survey results have estimated that 2.2 million emigrants from Tamil Nadu are living abroad, which is around 3 per cent of the total population of Tamil Nadu. Though Singapore is estimated to receive the largest number of emigrants from Tamil Nadu accounting to 410,000 followed by the UAE with 400,000 emigrants, GCC states between them receive over half of the emigrants, estimated to be 1.1 million. Tamil Nadu has a long history of its people migrating to Singapore and Malaysia and settling there. This had started in the pre-independence era, but the Gulf migration started recently and it gives different opportunities compared to Singapore or Malaysia. This chapter explores the characteristic distinctions of migration to GCC states. Through descriptive data analysis, the chapter explores the demographic data and it shows how 20 per cent of all migrants to non-GCC countries are female whereas it is 9 per cent in case of GCC countries. It also finds that Muslim population migrating to GCC is four times larger than the share of Muslim population migrating to non-GCC countries. Educational status of migrants is naturally different as the GCC countries require different educational qualification as compared to non-GCC countries and it is especially seen that one-third of the migrants to non-GCC countries has a college degree or more. Wage problems seem to exist with return migrants from both the countries, but it is slightly higher in case of GCC countries. As problems such as compulsory expatriation and poor working conditions are some of the reasons for returning among GCC migrants, most migrants in non-GCC countries return due to family problems and/or expiry of contract. Though countries such as Singapore and the USA has higher per-migrant remittance, the analysis and approximation of remittances reveal that GCC countries contribute to almost 50 per cent of all migration. The chapter concludes explaining the need to emphasize the importance of devising policies for migrants to GCC countries by understating their characteristics thoroughly. More... »

PAGES

247-273

Book

TITLE

India's Low-Skilled Migration to the Middle East

ISBN

978-981-13-9223-8
978-981-13-9224-5

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1121654905


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/16", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Studies in Human Society", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1603", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Demography", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Centre for Development Studies, Ulloor Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.433028.e", 
          "name": [
            "Centre for Development Studies, Ulloor Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Rajan", 
        "givenName": "S. Irudaya", 
        "id": "sg:person.01134466074.83", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01134466074.83"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "National Institute of Technology, Trichy, India", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.419653.c", 
          "name": [
            "National Institute of Technology, Trichy, India"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Rajan", 
        "givenName": "E. Sownthara", 
        "id": "sg:person.07747027363.07", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.07747027363.07"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2019-10-11", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2019-10-11", 
    "description": "Tamil Nadu migration survey 2015 was conducted to collect the migration data for Tamil Nadu and understand its impact as the series of Kerala migration surveys helped Government of Kerala in framing policies based on the results. Tamil Nadu migration survey results have estimated that 2.2 million emigrants from Tamil Nadu are living abroad, which is around 3 per cent of the total population of Tamil Nadu. Though Singapore is estimated to receive the largest number of emigrants from Tamil Nadu accounting to 410,000 followed by the UAE with 400,000 emigrants, GCC states between them receive over half of the emigrants, estimated to be 1.1 million. Tamil Nadu has a long history of its people migrating to Singapore and Malaysia and settling there. This had started in the pre-independence era, but the Gulf migration started recently and it gives different opportunities compared to Singapore or Malaysia. This chapter explores the characteristic distinctions of migration to GCC states. Through descriptive data analysis, the chapter explores the demographic data and it shows how 20 per cent of all migrants to non-GCC countries are female whereas it is 9 per cent in case of GCC countries. It also finds that Muslim population migrating to GCC is four times larger than the share of Muslim population migrating to non-GCC countries. Educational status of migrants is naturally different as the GCC countries require different educational qualification as compared to non-GCC countries and it is especially seen that one-third of the migrants to non-GCC countries has a college degree or more. Wage problems seem to exist with return migrants from both the countries, but it is slightly higher in case of GCC countries. As problems such as compulsory expatriation and poor working conditions are some of the reasons for returning among GCC migrants, most migrants in non-GCC countries return due to family problems and/or expiry of contract. Though countries such as Singapore and the USA has higher per-migrant remittance, the analysis and approximation of remittances reveal that GCC countries contribute to almost 50 per cent of all migration. The chapter concludes explaining the need to emphasize the importance of devising policies for migrants to GCC countries by understating their characteristics thoroughly.", 
    "editor": [
      {
        "familyName": "Rajan", 
        "givenName": "S. Irudaya", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Saxena", 
        "givenName": "Prem", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "genre": "chapter", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": {
      "isbn": [
        "978-981-13-9223-8", 
        "978-981-13-9224-5"
      ], 
      "name": "India's Low-Skilled Migration to the Middle East", 
      "type": "Book"
    }, 
    "keywords": [
      "non-GCC countries", 
      "GCC countries", 
      "GCC states", 
      "Muslim population", 
      "Kerala Migration Survey", 
      "Government of Kerala", 
      "pre-independence era", 
      "poor working conditions", 
      "Gulf migration", 
      "return migrants", 
      "migrant remittances", 
      "Tamil Nadu", 
      "Migration Survey", 
      "wage problem", 
      "most migrants", 
      "migrants", 
      "migration data", 
      "emigrants", 
      "different opportunities", 
      "remittances", 
      "countries", 
      "family problems", 
      "educational qualifications", 
      "policy", 
      "Singapore", 
      "college degree", 
      "long history", 
      "different educational qualifications", 
      "survey results", 
      "Nadu", 
      "working conditions", 
      "chapter", 
      "government", 
      "Malaysia", 
      "migration", 
      "expatriation", 
      "total population", 
      "educational status", 
      "people", 
      "Kerala", 
      "state", 
      "era", 
      "opportunities", 
      "UAE", 
      "data analysis", 
      "qualification", 
      "contracts", 
      "GCC", 
      "distinction", 
      "share", 
      "USA", 
      "need", 
      "survey", 
      "descriptive data analysis", 
      "population", 
      "impact", 
      "cent", 
      "reasons", 
      "history", 
      "problem", 
      "importance", 
      "expiry", 
      "status", 
      "analysis", 
      "demographic data", 
      "cases", 
      "one-third", 
      "Gulf", 
      "data", 
      "characteristic distinction", 
      "half", 
      "large number", 
      "degree", 
      "time", 
      "characteristics", 
      "number", 
      "results", 
      "series", 
      "conditions", 
      "approximation", 
      "Tamil Nadu migration survey 2015", 
      "Nadu migration survey 2015", 
      "migration survey 2015", 
      "survey 2015", 
      "Tamil Nadu migration survey results", 
      "Nadu migration survey results", 
      "migration survey results", 
      "compulsory expatriation", 
      "GCC migrants", 
      "expiry of contract", 
      "approximation of remittances", 
      "Tamil Nadu Migrants", 
      "Nadu Migrants"
    ], 
    "name": "Tamil Nadu Migrants in the Gulf", 
    "pagination": "247-273", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1121654905"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "publisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature", 
      "type": "Organisation"
    }, 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1121654905"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "chapters", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-01-01T19:27", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220101/entities/gbq_results/chapter/chapter_86.jsonl", 
    "type": "Chapter", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

168 TRIPLES      23 PREDICATES      117 URIs      110 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11 schema:about anzsrc-for:16
2 anzsrc-for:1603
3 schema:author Nc6794ef9b363435a84b9c761693e4f0d
4 schema:datePublished 2019-10-11
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2019-10-11
6 schema:description Tamil Nadu migration survey 2015 was conducted to collect the migration data for Tamil Nadu and understand its impact as the series of Kerala migration surveys helped Government of Kerala in framing policies based on the results. Tamil Nadu migration survey results have estimated that 2.2 million emigrants from Tamil Nadu are living abroad, which is around 3 per cent of the total population of Tamil Nadu. Though Singapore is estimated to receive the largest number of emigrants from Tamil Nadu accounting to 410,000 followed by the UAE with 400,000 emigrants, GCC states between them receive over half of the emigrants, estimated to be 1.1 million. Tamil Nadu has a long history of its people migrating to Singapore and Malaysia and settling there. This had started in the pre-independence era, but the Gulf migration started recently and it gives different opportunities compared to Singapore or Malaysia. This chapter explores the characteristic distinctions of migration to GCC states. Through descriptive data analysis, the chapter explores the demographic data and it shows how 20 per cent of all migrants to non-GCC countries are female whereas it is 9 per cent in case of GCC countries. It also finds that Muslim population migrating to GCC is four times larger than the share of Muslim population migrating to non-GCC countries. Educational status of migrants is naturally different as the GCC countries require different educational qualification as compared to non-GCC countries and it is especially seen that one-third of the migrants to non-GCC countries has a college degree or more. Wage problems seem to exist with return migrants from both the countries, but it is slightly higher in case of GCC countries. As problems such as compulsory expatriation and poor working conditions are some of the reasons for returning among GCC migrants, most migrants in non-GCC countries return due to family problems and/or expiry of contract. Though countries such as Singapore and the USA has higher per-migrant remittance, the analysis and approximation of remittances reveal that GCC countries contribute to almost 50 per cent of all migration. The chapter concludes explaining the need to emphasize the importance of devising policies for migrants to GCC countries by understating their characteristics thoroughly.
7 schema:editor N63f5f279714642b581f7f8aa40452323
8 schema:genre chapter
9 schema:inLanguage en
10 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
11 schema:isPartOf N3e458d288c6248ce9c62ac03aaec22f2
12 schema:keywords GCC
13 GCC countries
14 GCC migrants
15 GCC states
16 Government of Kerala
17 Gulf
18 Gulf migration
19 Kerala
20 Kerala Migration Survey
21 Malaysia
22 Migration Survey
23 Muslim population
24 Nadu
25 Nadu Migrants
26 Nadu migration survey 2015
27 Nadu migration survey results
28 Singapore
29 Tamil Nadu
30 Tamil Nadu Migrants
31 Tamil Nadu migration survey 2015
32 Tamil Nadu migration survey results
33 UAE
34 USA
35 analysis
36 approximation
37 approximation of remittances
38 cases
39 cent
40 chapter
41 characteristic distinction
42 characteristics
43 college degree
44 compulsory expatriation
45 conditions
46 contracts
47 countries
48 data
49 data analysis
50 degree
51 demographic data
52 descriptive data analysis
53 different educational qualifications
54 different opportunities
55 distinction
56 educational qualifications
57 educational status
58 emigrants
59 era
60 expatriation
61 expiry
62 expiry of contract
63 family problems
64 government
65 half
66 history
67 impact
68 importance
69 large number
70 long history
71 migrant remittances
72 migrants
73 migration
74 migration data
75 migration survey 2015
76 migration survey results
77 most migrants
78 need
79 non-GCC countries
80 number
81 one-third
82 opportunities
83 people
84 policy
85 poor working conditions
86 population
87 pre-independence era
88 problem
89 qualification
90 reasons
91 remittances
92 results
93 return migrants
94 series
95 share
96 state
97 status
98 survey
99 survey 2015
100 survey results
101 time
102 total population
103 wage problem
104 working conditions
105 schema:name Tamil Nadu Migrants in the Gulf
106 schema:pagination 247-273
107 schema:productId N698c954d6100494aad45ba399a5f33ba
108 Naf6f0d7464c841fdb86026cac3ed3fcf
109 schema:publisher N77b5d8ced38140428d1864a8ce4c58f4
110 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1121654905
111 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11
112 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-01-01T19:27
113 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
114 schema:sdPublisher Nd60fa8efd971420e90373af471b221a4
115 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11
116 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
117 sgo:sdDataset chapters
118 rdf:type schema:Chapter
119 N1822c3c7caa4451391d10a5fe72119a8 rdf:first Ne2d7c598f7ef4345a94c660145336daf
120 rdf:rest rdf:nil
121 N3e458d288c6248ce9c62ac03aaec22f2 schema:isbn 978-981-13-9223-8
122 978-981-13-9224-5
123 schema:name India's Low-Skilled Migration to the Middle East
124 rdf:type schema:Book
125 N63f5f279714642b581f7f8aa40452323 rdf:first Nb065db536599470f8f1230c15e8a6c19
126 rdf:rest N1822c3c7caa4451391d10a5fe72119a8
127 N698c954d6100494aad45ba399a5f33ba schema:name dimensions_id
128 schema:value pub.1121654905
129 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
130 N77b5d8ced38140428d1864a8ce4c58f4 schema:name Springer Nature
131 rdf:type schema:Organisation
132 Naf6f0d7464c841fdb86026cac3ed3fcf schema:name doi
133 schema:value 10.1007/978-981-13-9224-5_11
134 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
135 Nb065db536599470f8f1230c15e8a6c19 schema:familyName Rajan
136 schema:givenName S. Irudaya
137 rdf:type schema:Person
138 Nb978c96b37a8417eae6d80d00c65e9f9 rdf:first sg:person.07747027363.07
139 rdf:rest rdf:nil
140 Nc6794ef9b363435a84b9c761693e4f0d rdf:first sg:person.01134466074.83
141 rdf:rest Nb978c96b37a8417eae6d80d00c65e9f9
142 Nd60fa8efd971420e90373af471b221a4 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
143 rdf:type schema:Organization
144 Ne2d7c598f7ef4345a94c660145336daf schema:familyName Saxena
145 schema:givenName Prem
146 rdf:type schema:Person
147 anzsrc-for:16 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
148 schema:name Studies in Human Society
149 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
150 anzsrc-for:1603 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
151 schema:name Demography
152 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
153 sg:person.01134466074.83 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.433028.e
154 schema:familyName Rajan
155 schema:givenName S. Irudaya
156 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01134466074.83
157 rdf:type schema:Person
158 sg:person.07747027363.07 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.419653.c
159 schema:familyName Rajan
160 schema:givenName E. Sownthara
161 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.07747027363.07
162 rdf:type schema:Person
163 grid-institutes:grid.419653.c schema:alternateName National Institute of Technology, Trichy, India
164 schema:name National Institute of Technology, Trichy, India
165 rdf:type schema:Organization
166 grid-institutes:grid.433028.e schema:alternateName Centre for Development Studies, Ulloor Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
167 schema:name Centre for Development Studies, Ulloor Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
168 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...