Cell-Free DNA View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2019-05-31

AUTHORS

Hiroyuki Yamamoto , Yoshiyuki Watanabe , Fumio Itoh

ABSTRACT

Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) found in the plasma or serum is derived from multiple sources, including tumor cells. The fraction of cfDNA derived from tumor cells is termed circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA). Despite the low levels of ctDNA in normal cfDNA, advances in digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have led to significant improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of variant detection. As a result, the literature regarding ctDNA assays has been rapidly increasing. The genomic profiles of ctDNA have been shown to closely match those of the corresponding tumors, which has important implications for both molecular pathology and clinical oncology. Noninvasive diagnostic techniques using ctDNA have the potential to innovate new prognostic factors and direct treatment intervention. Analyses of ctDNA, commonly referred to as “liquid biopsies,” can be used for treatment selection, treatment outcome monitoring, residual disease detection, cancer screening in asymptomatic individuals, and tumor dynamics monitoring. In this chapter, we summarize how different ctDNA assays can be used to guide patient care and should be integrated into the clinical practice. More... »

PAGES

11-24

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-981-13-7295-7_2

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-7295-7_2

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1116020184


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