Critical Reaction to Emergent Evolution View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1992

AUTHORS

David Blitz , Stephen Pepper , Charles Baylis , William McDougall , Bertrand Russell

ABSTRACT

At its apogee, emergent evolution found its finest medium of expression in metaphysical systems such as those of Lloyd Morgan and Samuel Alexander. As a philosophical trend it was at its height during the period of the mid-1920s. A session devoted to it at the VIth World Congress of Philosophy, as well as a colloquium held at the Aristotelian Society were indicative of the interest for the new concept.1 As the trend of emergent evolution developed, a number of criticisms were made. Stephen Pepper rejected emergentism as an incoherent concept, while Charles Baylis argued that emergence was so ubiquitous as to be trivial. William McDougall subjected emergent evolution to a general critique from the point of view of interactive dualism, while Bertrand Russell rejected it from the point of view of neutral monism. Finally, Rudolf Carnap in his defence of reductionism provided the alternative to emergence that became dominant during the period of the mid-1930s through to the early-1950s during what I term the “eclipse of emergentism.” More... »

PAGES

141-150

Book

TITLE

Emergent Evolution

ISBN

978-90-481-4141-8
978-94-015-8042-7

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032576582


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/2203", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Philosophy", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/22", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Philosophy and Religious Studies", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "familyName": "Blitz", 
        "givenName": "David", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Pepper", 
        "givenName": "Stephen", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Baylis", 
        "givenName": "Charles", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "McDougall", 
        "givenName": "William", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Russell", 
        "givenName": "Bertrand", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1992", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1992-01-01", 
    "description": "At its apogee, emergent evolution found its finest medium of expression in metaphysical systems such as those of Lloyd Morgan and Samuel Alexander. As a philosophical trend it was at its height during the period of the mid-1920s. A session devoted to it at the VIth World Congress of Philosophy, as well as a colloquium held at the Aristotelian Society were indicative of the interest for the new concept.1 As the trend of emergent evolution developed, a number of criticisms were made. Stephen Pepper rejected emergentism as an incoherent concept, while Charles Baylis argued that emergence was so ubiquitous as to be trivial. William McDougall subjected emergent evolution to a general critique from the point of view of interactive dualism, while Bertrand Russell rejected it from the point of view of neutral monism. Finally, Rudolf Carnap in his defence of reductionism provided the alternative to emergence that became dominant during the period of the mid-1930s through to the early-1950s during what I term the \u201ceclipse of emergentism.\u201d", 
    "genre": "chapter", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13", 
    "inLanguage": [
      "en"
    ], 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": {
      "isbn": [
        "978-90-481-4141-8", 
        "978-94-015-8042-7"
      ], 
      "name": "Emergent Evolution", 
      "type": "Book"
    }, 
    "name": "Critical Reaction to Emergent Evolution", 
    "pagination": "141-150", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "readcube_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "9b31270296ebededb57a6e594602ec5ad49415e8affcaf02e73eefdd2366e9c3"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1032576582"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "publisher": {
      "location": "Dordrecht", 
      "name": "Springer Netherlands", 
      "type": "Organisation"
    }, 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032576582"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "chapters", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2019-04-15T23:40", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-uberresearch-data-dimensions-target-20181106-alternative/cleanup/v134/2549eaecd7973599484d7c17b260dba0a4ecb94b/merge/v9/a6c9fde33151104705d4d7ff012ea9563521a3ce/jats-lookup/v90/0000000001_0000000264/records_8697_00000056.jsonl", 
    "type": "Chapter", 
    "url": "http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

74 TRIPLES      21 PREDICATES      26 URIs      19 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13 schema:about anzsrc-for:22
2 anzsrc-for:2203
3 schema:author Na656e3928d564cd6a5c130209230d969
4 schema:datePublished 1992
5 schema:datePublishedReg 1992-01-01
6 schema:description At its apogee, emergent evolution found its finest medium of expression in metaphysical systems such as those of Lloyd Morgan and Samuel Alexander. As a philosophical trend it was at its height during the period of the mid-1920s. A session devoted to it at the VIth World Congress of Philosophy, as well as a colloquium held at the Aristotelian Society were indicative of the interest for the new concept.1 As the trend of emergent evolution developed, a number of criticisms were made. Stephen Pepper rejected emergentism as an incoherent concept, while Charles Baylis argued that emergence was so ubiquitous as to be trivial. William McDougall subjected emergent evolution to a general critique from the point of view of interactive dualism, while Bertrand Russell rejected it from the point of view of neutral monism. Finally, Rudolf Carnap in his defence of reductionism provided the alternative to emergence that became dominant during the period of the mid-1930s through to the early-1950s during what I term the “eclipse of emergentism.”
7 schema:genre chapter
8 schema:inLanguage en
9 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
10 schema:isPartOf N25060987ef614f48aaaccc3b2bef9794
11 schema:name Critical Reaction to Emergent Evolution
12 schema:pagination 141-150
13 schema:productId N219de5511ed94adc9aae44cdf9e18686
14 Na3b3485ed7fd4610b58bce4c973b4cc9
15 Nd6caefd8f3bb48b7834f73ad9f6232ad
16 schema:publisher Nb0010db3f1984c11976c4899b3cd7494
17 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1032576582
18 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13
19 schema:sdDatePublished 2019-04-15T23:40
20 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
21 schema:sdPublisher N5bb1020f967043acbccbe17b29315b52
22 schema:url http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13
23 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
24 sgo:sdDataset chapters
25 rdf:type schema:Chapter
26 N219de5511ed94adc9aae44cdf9e18686 schema:name doi
27 schema:value 10.1007/978-94-015-8042-7_13
28 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
29 N25060987ef614f48aaaccc3b2bef9794 schema:isbn 978-90-481-4141-8
30 978-94-015-8042-7
31 schema:name Emergent Evolution
32 rdf:type schema:Book
33 N267a60250108421cab0443872615f298 rdf:first Nef20112c5faa473890c00044c2f0cb75
34 rdf:rest N38783a377e0c4fe6bc85554d23add8c2
35 N38783a377e0c4fe6bc85554d23add8c2 rdf:first Ne7d97e5644e44d298a381e15f2476f79
36 rdf:rest N5279dc5846f04e1e93187ab7edf16545
37 N5279dc5846f04e1e93187ab7edf16545 rdf:first N847a015af2c5494a8e174edbcf8efc23
38 rdf:rest rdf:nil
39 N5bb1020f967043acbccbe17b29315b52 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
40 rdf:type schema:Organization
41 N6ce74726dc6346298c61967169951461 rdf:first Nb52e753db20e4eae84c48729660c2b59
42 rdf:rest N267a60250108421cab0443872615f298
43 N847a015af2c5494a8e174edbcf8efc23 schema:familyName Russell
44 schema:givenName Bertrand
45 rdf:type schema:Person
46 Na3b3485ed7fd4610b58bce4c973b4cc9 schema:name readcube_id
47 schema:value 9b31270296ebededb57a6e594602ec5ad49415e8affcaf02e73eefdd2366e9c3
48 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
49 Na656e3928d564cd6a5c130209230d969 rdf:first Ncd91b5dec48a420baf0211494e0651dc
50 rdf:rest N6ce74726dc6346298c61967169951461
51 Nb0010db3f1984c11976c4899b3cd7494 schema:location Dordrecht
52 schema:name Springer Netherlands
53 rdf:type schema:Organisation
54 Nb52e753db20e4eae84c48729660c2b59 schema:familyName Pepper
55 schema:givenName Stephen
56 rdf:type schema:Person
57 Ncd91b5dec48a420baf0211494e0651dc schema:familyName Blitz
58 schema:givenName David
59 rdf:type schema:Person
60 Nd6caefd8f3bb48b7834f73ad9f6232ad schema:name dimensions_id
61 schema:value pub.1032576582
62 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
63 Ne7d97e5644e44d298a381e15f2476f79 schema:familyName McDougall
64 schema:givenName William
65 rdf:type schema:Person
66 Nef20112c5faa473890c00044c2f0cb75 schema:familyName Baylis
67 schema:givenName Charles
68 rdf:type schema:Person
69 anzsrc-for:22 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
70 schema:name Philosophy and Religious Studies
71 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
72 anzsrc-for:2203 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
73 schema:name Philosophy
74 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...