Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1976

AUTHORS

M. Michael Thaler

ABSTRACT

Bilirubin accumulates in newborn infants during the first week after birth. Expressed in general terms, this universal phenomenon can be attributed to temporary imbalance between bilirubin production and clearance, created at birth by the abrupt termination of placental clearance functions. Prematurity accentuates the disparity between production and elimination of bilirubin. Accordingly, neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia (‘physiologic jaundice’) is an expression of maturational dysequilibrium between metabolic processes governing bilirubin formation and excretion after birth. Physiologic jaundice may reflect excessive formation of pigment from erythrocyte and tissue heme pools, immaturity of mechanisms responsible for pigment removal or a combination of both. This type of jaundice may become pathologic when conditions which add to pigment load, or interfere with pigment clearance, intervene during the labile period of adjustment to extrauterine life (12). Inherited or acquired hemolytic disorders such as maternal-fetal blood group incompatibility, red cell enzymopathies (most commonly glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency) and hematoma due to trauma at delivery may elevate the body content of unconjugated bilirubin dangerously. Clinical evidence suggests that common metabolic problems of premature or ill newborns — hypoxia, hypoglycemia, caloric deficiency, acidosis, dehydration — may shift the input/output bilirubin ratio further toward sequestration of pigment. More... »

PAGES

25-33

Book

TITLE

Liver Diseases in Infancy and Childhood

ISBN

978-94-010-1419-9
978-94-010-1417-5

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1037936449


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/11", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Medical and Health Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1114", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "familyName": "Thaler", 
        "givenName": "M. Michael", 
        "id": "sg:person.072023511.91", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.072023511.91"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "1976", 
    "datePublishedReg": "1976-01-01", 
    "description": "Bilirubin accumulates in newborn infants during the first week after birth. Expressed in general terms, this universal phenomenon can be attributed to temporary imbalance between bilirubin production and clearance, created at birth by the abrupt termination of placental clearance functions. Prematurity accentuates the disparity between production and elimination of bilirubin. Accordingly, neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia (\u2018physiologic jaundice\u2019) is an expression of maturational dysequilibrium between metabolic processes governing bilirubin formation and excretion after birth. Physiologic jaundice may reflect excessive formation of pigment from erythrocyte and tissue heme pools, immaturity of mechanisms responsible for pigment removal or a combination of both. This type of jaundice may become pathologic when conditions which add to pigment load, or interfere with pigment clearance, intervene during the labile period of adjustment to extrauterine life (12). Inherited or acquired hemolytic disorders such as maternal-fetal blood group incompatibility, red cell enzymopathies (most commonly glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency) and hematoma due to trauma at delivery may elevate the body content of unconjugated bilirubin dangerously. Clinical evidence suggests that common metabolic problems of premature or ill newborns \u2014 hypoxia, hypoglycemia, caloric deficiency, acidosis, dehydration \u2014 may shift the input/output bilirubin ratio further toward sequestration of pigment.", 
    "editor": [
      {
        "familyName": "Berenberg", 
        "givenName": "Samuel R.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "genre": "chapter", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": {
      "isbn": [
        "978-94-010-1419-9", 
        "978-94-010-1417-5"
      ], 
      "name": "Liver Diseases in Infancy and Childhood", 
      "type": "Book"
    }, 
    "keywords": [
      "maternal-fetal blood group incompatibility", 
      "common metabolic problem", 
      "neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia", 
      "blood group incompatibility", 
      "elimination of bilirubin", 
      "types of jaundice", 
      "physiologic jaundice", 
      "clinical evidence", 
      "neonatal hyperbilirubinemia", 
      "newborn infants", 
      "caloric deficiency", 
      "clearance function", 
      "metabolic problems", 
      "unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia", 
      "hemolytic disorders", 
      "bilirubin production", 
      "first week", 
      "unconjugated bilirubin", 
      "red cell enzymopathies", 
      "bilirubin", 
      "pigment clearance", 
      "bilirubin formation", 
      "jaundice", 
      "hyperbilirubinemia", 
      "birth", 
      "labile period", 
      "excessive formation", 
      "clearance", 
      "body content", 
      "heme pool", 
      "hematoma", 
      "prematurity", 
      "hypoglycemia", 
      "dysequilibrium", 
      "acidosis", 
      "infants", 
      "pigment load", 
      "trauma", 
      "excretion", 
      "weeks", 
      "disorders", 
      "abrupt termination", 
      "immaturity", 
      "metabolic processes", 
      "erythrocytes", 
      "deficiency", 
      "enzymopathies", 
      "delivery", 
      "expression", 
      "disparities", 
      "adjustment", 
      "imbalance", 
      "evidence", 
      "period", 
      "temporary imbalance", 
      "elimination", 
      "life", 
      "termination", 
      "production", 
      "pigment removal", 
      "mechanism", 
      "combination", 
      "function", 
      "removal", 
      "pool", 
      "universal phenomenon", 
      "types", 
      "formation", 
      "dehydration", 
      "general terms", 
      "sequestration", 
      "conditions", 
      "pigments", 
      "incompatibility", 
      "load", 
      "content", 
      "terms", 
      "phenomenon", 
      "problem", 
      "process", 
      "placental clearance functions", 
      "maturational dysequilibrium", 
      "tissue heme pools", 
      "immaturity of mechanisms", 
      "group incompatibility", 
      "cell enzymopathies", 
      "ill newborns \u2014 hypoxia", 
      "newborns \u2014 hypoxia", 
      "input/output bilirubin", 
      "output bilirubin", 
      "sequestration of pigment"
    ], 
    "name": "Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia", 
    "pagination": "25-33", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1037936449"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "publisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature", 
      "type": "Organisation"
    }, 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1037936449"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "chapters", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2021-11-01T19:03", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20211101/entities/gbq_results/chapter/chapter_86.jsonl", 
    "type": "Chapter", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

147 TRIPLES      23 PREDICATES      117 URIs      110 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3 schema:about anzsrc-for:11
2 anzsrc-for:1114
3 schema:author N14177218f3074773bb51ab09bff7f242
4 schema:datePublished 1976
5 schema:datePublishedReg 1976-01-01
6 schema:description Bilirubin accumulates in newborn infants during the first week after birth. Expressed in general terms, this universal phenomenon can be attributed to temporary imbalance between bilirubin production and clearance, created at birth by the abrupt termination of placental clearance functions. Prematurity accentuates the disparity between production and elimination of bilirubin. Accordingly, neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia (‘physiologic jaundice’) is an expression of maturational dysequilibrium between metabolic processes governing bilirubin formation and excretion after birth. Physiologic jaundice may reflect excessive formation of pigment from erythrocyte and tissue heme pools, immaturity of mechanisms responsible for pigment removal or a combination of both. This type of jaundice may become pathologic when conditions which add to pigment load, or interfere with pigment clearance, intervene during the labile period of adjustment to extrauterine life (12). Inherited or acquired hemolytic disorders such as maternal-fetal blood group incompatibility, red cell enzymopathies (most commonly glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency) and hematoma due to trauma at delivery may elevate the body content of unconjugated bilirubin dangerously. Clinical evidence suggests that common metabolic problems of premature or ill newborns — hypoxia, hypoglycemia, caloric deficiency, acidosis, dehydration — may shift the input/output bilirubin ratio further toward sequestration of pigment.
7 schema:editor N2ffd8a554df54fcfbe72fef2836fcaf9
8 schema:genre chapter
9 schema:inLanguage en
10 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
11 schema:isPartOf N4c420a54c5da45419d40a671d490d637
12 schema:keywords abrupt termination
13 acidosis
14 adjustment
15 bilirubin
16 bilirubin formation
17 bilirubin production
18 birth
19 blood group incompatibility
20 body content
21 caloric deficiency
22 cell enzymopathies
23 clearance
24 clearance function
25 clinical evidence
26 combination
27 common metabolic problem
28 conditions
29 content
30 deficiency
31 dehydration
32 delivery
33 disorders
34 disparities
35 dysequilibrium
36 elimination
37 elimination of bilirubin
38 enzymopathies
39 erythrocytes
40 evidence
41 excessive formation
42 excretion
43 expression
44 first week
45 formation
46 function
47 general terms
48 group incompatibility
49 hematoma
50 heme pool
51 hemolytic disorders
52 hyperbilirubinemia
53 hypoglycemia
54 ill newborns — hypoxia
55 imbalance
56 immaturity
57 immaturity of mechanisms
58 incompatibility
59 infants
60 input/output bilirubin
61 jaundice
62 labile period
63 life
64 load
65 maternal-fetal blood group incompatibility
66 maturational dysequilibrium
67 mechanism
68 metabolic problems
69 metabolic processes
70 neonatal hyperbilirubinemia
71 neonatal unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia
72 newborn infants
73 newborns — hypoxia
74 output bilirubin
75 period
76 phenomenon
77 physiologic jaundice
78 pigment clearance
79 pigment load
80 pigment removal
81 pigments
82 placental clearance functions
83 pool
84 prematurity
85 problem
86 process
87 production
88 red cell enzymopathies
89 removal
90 sequestration
91 sequestration of pigment
92 temporary imbalance
93 termination
94 terms
95 tissue heme pools
96 trauma
97 types
98 types of jaundice
99 unconjugated bilirubin
100 unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia
101 universal phenomenon
102 weeks
103 schema:name Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia
104 schema:pagination 25-33
105 schema:productId N3318a0e0ed974af6bf24c1bba9d5a7f0
106 Nff86427c60b04ee09dcc3356657841a3
107 schema:publisher N974cbd9151ac43be8d7b91439842d7db
108 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1037936449
109 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3
110 schema:sdDatePublished 2021-11-01T19:03
111 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
112 schema:sdPublisher N1790fd54b73b49f3b804b1abaed81bfb
113 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3
114 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
115 sgo:sdDataset chapters
116 rdf:type schema:Chapter
117 N14177218f3074773bb51ab09bff7f242 rdf:first sg:person.072023511.91
118 rdf:rest rdf:nil
119 N1790fd54b73b49f3b804b1abaed81bfb schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
120 rdf:type schema:Organization
121 N2ffd8a554df54fcfbe72fef2836fcaf9 rdf:first Neb0573561c0a4df8a953865d775cbe4e
122 rdf:rest rdf:nil
123 N3318a0e0ed974af6bf24c1bba9d5a7f0 schema:name dimensions_id
124 schema:value pub.1037936449
125 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
126 N4c420a54c5da45419d40a671d490d637 schema:isbn 978-94-010-1417-5
127 978-94-010-1419-9
128 schema:name Liver Diseases in Infancy and Childhood
129 rdf:type schema:Book
130 N974cbd9151ac43be8d7b91439842d7db schema:name Springer Nature
131 rdf:type schema:Organisation
132 Neb0573561c0a4df8a953865d775cbe4e schema:familyName Berenberg
133 schema:givenName Samuel R.
134 rdf:type schema:Person
135 Nff86427c60b04ee09dcc3356657841a3 schema:name doi
136 schema:value 10.1007/978-94-010-1417-5_3
137 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
138 anzsrc-for:11 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
139 schema:name Medical and Health Sciences
140 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
141 anzsrc-for:1114 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
142 schema:name Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
143 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
144 sg:person.072023511.91 schema:familyName Thaler
145 schema:givenName M. Michael
146 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.072023511.91
147 rdf:type schema:Person
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...