Microbial Interactions with Mineral Materials View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1988

AUTHORS

Wolfgang E. Krumbein

ABSTRACT

Microbes in the form of epilithic (on the surface),chasmolithic (in cleavages and fissures) and endolithic (within the material or interstitial space of the material) complex microbial communities interact in many different ways with mineral material and its external environment. Microbialfilms and microbial mats have been found on and within rock and concrete with dominantly phototrophic, chemoorganotrophic, chemolithoautotrophic as well as aerobic and anaerobic communities. Microbial systems may dominantly be embedded in mucous extracellular substances, may be attached to surfaces via fimbriae and fibrils, may be motile or sessile, and may interact in a biodeteriorating and in some cases also protective way with the material and its environment. Some examples are given of the catalytic effects of microbial systems on physico-chemical reactions between rock, concrete and the environment including detrimental chemical radicals in the environment. The latter may be biogenic or anthropogenic. The fractal physics of the mesoscopic system are discussed in relation to the microbial system and the interior surfaces of rock and concrete. In this respect diffusion-limited aggregation and pitting processes are discussed. The ‘weathering’ or ‘transformation’ processes and morphologies resulting are discussed in the light of mainly two questions:(1) Is it possible to define quantitative ratios of ‘biodeterioration’ versus physico-chemical deterioration? and (2)is it possible to define typical biogenic deterioration morphologies? The conclusion is that on increasingly larger (macroscopic)scales the answer is negative since the whole planet is a biologically controlled system and can only be regarded and analysed as a ‘bioid’ or ‘bioplanet’. The individual physical, chemical and biological compartments already at mesoscopic levels are too interactive in many cases to give percentages or balanced calculations of mere physical or chemical reactions, especially because life itself is little more than accelerated or retarded physical and chemical reactions. More... »

PAGES

78-100

Book

TITLE

Biodeterioration 7

ISBN

978-94-010-7107-9
978-94-009-1363-9

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-009-1363-9_11

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-1363-9_11

DIMENSIONS

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