Markedness and Language Development View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1989

AUTHORS

Steven Pinker

ABSTRACT

Recent theories of Universal Grammar have placed an increased emphasis on the notion of markedness as an explanatory principle (e.g., Chomsky, 1981; Bresnan, 1982). Marked rules are those that generate constructions that are statistically rare across languages or across the lexical items of a single language, and such rules usually violate some formal principle that holds of otherwise similar rules in a grammar. The rarity and formal atypicality of marked rules are often related by proposing that atypical rules fall outside a highly constrained universal “core grammar.” The core grammar would have several parameters of variation that would be fixed during the course of language acquisition; possibly with a preference structure dictating that certain parameter values are to be chosen given a lack of relevant evidence, or that some parameter values are less “preferred” than others. The less preferred parameter settings would define marked rules; in addition, outside of the core there would be a “periphery” of rules that might have different properties, fewer constraints, or be learned by different sorts of mechanisms; and these too are often termed “marked” (e.g., in Chapter 1 of Chomsky, 1981, where both nonpreferred settings of core parameters and peripheral rules are considered marked). More... »

PAGES

107-127

Book

TITLE

Learnability and Linguistic Theory

ISBN

978-0-7923-0558-3
978-94-009-0955-7

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-009-0955-7_6

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-009-0955-7_6

DIMENSIONS

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