Biometric Recognition: An Overview View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2012-03-06

AUTHORS

Anil K. Jain , Ajay Kumar

ABSTRACT

Prevailing methods of human identification based on credentials (identification documents and PIN) are not able to meet the growing demands for stringent security in applications such as national ID cards, border crossings, government benefits, and access control. As a result, biometric recognition, or simply biometrics, which is based on physiological and behavioural characteristics of a person, is being increasingly adopted and mapped to rapidly growing person identification applications. Unlike credentials (documents and PIN), biometric traits (e.g., fingerprint, face, and iris) cannot be lost, stolen, or easily forged; they are also considered to be persistent and unique. Use of biometrics is not new; fingerprints have been successfully used for over 100 years in law enforcement and forensics to identify and apprehend criminals. But, as biometrics permeates our society, this recognition technology faces new challenges. The design and suitability of biometric technology for person identification depends on the application requirements. These requirements are typically specified in terms of identification accuracy, throughput, user acceptance, system security, robustness, and return on investment. The next generation biometric technology must overcome many hurdles and challenges to improve the recognition accuracy. These include ability to handle poor quality and incomplete data, achieve scalability to accommodate hundreds of millions of users, ensure interoperability, and protect user privacy while reducing system cost and enhancing system integrity. This chapter presents an overview of biometrics, some of the emerging biometric technologies and their limitations, and examines future challenges. More... »

PAGES

49-79

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-94-007-3892-8_3

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-3892-8_3

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1036528525


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