Effects of Gametophytic Selection on the Genetic Structure of Populations View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1992

AUTHORS

M. Sari Gorla

ABSTRACT

In the classical view, population genetic models are based on the assumption that the haploid phase is genetically silent; thus they take into account the adaptive characteristic only of the diploid phase. This is likely to be true of animal populations: notwithstanding many examples of non-Mendelian segregation have been described (Zimmering et al 1970), in animals the opportunities for gametic selection are small, since the phenotypes of eggs and sperms seem to be largely determined by the diploid genotypes of the organism that produced them. In lower plants, such as mosses, in which the gametophytes are a major part of the life cycle, selection in this stage is certainly important, perhaps more so than is selection in sporophytes. In higher plants the issue is not so evident, but it is now well established that the conventional assumption is not justified: when the effects of selection in natural or cultivated plant populations are studied, not only sporophytic, but also gametophytic selection has to be taken into account. More... »

PAGES

151-159

Book

TITLE

Sexual Plant Reproduction

ISBN

978-3-642-77679-3
978-3-642-77677-9

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-3-642-77677-9_15

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-77677-9_15

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045111875


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