Suppression of Contact Hypersensitivity by Ultraviolet Radiation: An Experimental Model View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1983

AUTHORS

Frances P. Noonan , Edward C. De Fabo , Margaret L. Kripke

ABSTRACT

Studies on the immunologic factors involved in skin cancer induction in mice by ultraviolet (UV) radiation have suggested that several immunologic processes can be altered by UV exposure. Following the observation that many UV-induced murine skin cancers are rejected immunologically upon transplantation into normal syngeneic animals [12], studies were initiated to investigate how these highly antigenic squamous carcinomas and fibrosarcomas escaped immunologic destruction in the primary host [15]. These studies led to the discovery that UV irradiation of the shaved dorsum of mice produced systemic changes in the animals that interfered with the normal immunologic rejection of these skin cancers [13,15]. One aspect of this systemic change has been elucidated in recent experiments, which produced the rather startling finding that a subcarcinogenic exposure of mice to UV radiation resulted in the induction of suppressor T lymphocytes. These cells, present in spleens and lymph nodes of UV-irradiated mice, prevent the development of an immune response against UV-induced tumors [2, 5, 6, 24]. The specificity of this immunologic alteration in UV-irradiated mice was investigated by testing their immune responses to a variety of antigens [15–17,22,25]. Although many immune responses proceeded normally in UV-irradiated animals, a depressed response to the contact sensitizer, dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), was observed [16]. Studies on the mechanism of this systemic suppression of immunity to DNCB demonstrated that there was a second immunologic alteration in UV-irradiated mice and suggested that this alteration occurred at the level of the cells involved in antigen uptake, processing, and presentation, i.e., macrophages or Langerhans cells [11]. More... »

PAGES

169-180

Book

TITLE

Immunodermatology

ISBN

978-3-540-11738-4
978-3-642-68702-0

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-3-642-68702-0_14

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-68702-0_14

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1020250060


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