The Age of Pervasive Computing – Everything Smart, Everything Connected? View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2004

AUTHORS

Friedemann Mattern

ABSTRACT

Given the continuing technical progress in computing and communication, it seems that we are heading towards an all-encompassing use of networks and computing power, a new era commonly termed ”Pervasive Computing”. Its vision is grounded in the firm belief amongst the scientific community that Moore’s Law (i.e. the observation that the computer power available on a chip approximately doubles every eighteen months) will hold true for at least another 10 years. This means that in the next few years, microprocessors will become so small and inexpensive that they can be embedded in almost everything – not only electrical devices, cars, household appliances, toys, and tools, but also such mundane things as pencils (e.g. to digitize everything we draw) and clothes. All these devices will be interwoven and connected together by wireless networks. In fact, technology is expected to make further dramatic improvements, which means that eventually billions of tiny and mobile processors will occupy the environment and be incorporated into many objects of the physical world.Together with powerful and cheap sensors (and thus the ability to sense the environment), this progress in processor and communication technology will render everyday objects ”smart” – they know where they are, and they may adapt to the environment and provide useful services in addition to their original purpose. These smart objects may form spontaneous networks, giving rise to a world-wide distributed system several orders of magnitude larger than today’s Internet.It is clear that we are moving only gradually towards the ultimate vision of Pervasive Computing. Much progress in computer science, communication engineering, and material science is necessary to render the vision economically feasible and to overcome current technological hurdles. However, the prospects of a world of things that virtually talk to each other are fascinating: many new services would then be possible that transform the huge amount of information gathered by the smart devices into value for the human user, and an entire industry may be set up to establish and run the underlying infrastructure for the smart and networked objects.Clearly, there are also many issues on the political, legal, and social level to consider. Privacy is certainly a primary concern when devices or smart everyday objects can be localized and traced, and when various objects we use daily report their state and sensor information to other objects. The repercussions of such an extensive integration of computer technology into our everyday lives as Pervasive Computing advocates it, are difficult to predict and only time will tell whether this technology does contribute to a better and more enjoyable world or, on the contrary, promote a more totalitarian regime. More... »

PAGES

1-1

Book

TITLE

Security in Pervasive Computing

ISBN

978-3-540-20887-7
978-3-540-39881-3

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045134190


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/08", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Information and Computing Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0806", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Information Systems", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Institute for Pervasive Computing, ETH Zurich, Switzerland", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.5801.c", 
          "name": [
            "Institute for Pervasive Computing, ETH Zurich, Switzerland"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Mattern", 
        "givenName": "Friedemann", 
        "id": "sg:person.012317614157.00", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.012317614157.00"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2004", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2004-01-01", 
    "description": "Given the continuing technical progress in computing and communication, it seems that we are heading towards an all-encompassing use of networks and computing power, a new era commonly termed \u201dPervasive Computing\u201d. Its vision is grounded in the firm belief amongst the scientific community that Moore\u2019s Law (i.e. the observation that the computer power available on a chip approximately doubles every eighteen months) will hold true for at least another 10 years. This means that in the next few years, microprocessors will become so small and inexpensive that they can be embedded in almost everything \u2013 not only electrical devices, cars, household appliances, toys, and tools, but also such mundane things as pencils (e.g. to digitize everything we draw) and clothes. All these devices will be interwoven and connected together by wireless networks. In fact, technology is expected to make further dramatic improvements, which means that eventually billions of tiny and mobile processors will occupy the environment and be incorporated into many objects of the physical world.Together with powerful and cheap sensors (and thus the ability to sense the environment), this progress in processor and communication technology will render everyday objects \u201dsmart\u201d \u2013 they know where they are, and they may adapt to the environment and provide useful services in addition to their original purpose. These smart objects may form spontaneous networks, giving rise to a world-wide distributed system several orders of magnitude larger than today\u2019s Internet.It is clear that we are moving only gradually towards the ultimate vision of Pervasive Computing. Much progress in computer science, communication engineering, and material science is necessary to render the vision economically feasible and to overcome current technological hurdles. However, the prospects of a world of things that virtually talk to each other are fascinating: many new services would then be possible that transform the huge amount of information gathered by the smart devices into value for the human user, and an entire industry may be set up to establish and run the underlying infrastructure for the smart and networked objects.Clearly, there are also many issues on the political, legal, and social level to consider. Privacy is certainly a primary concern when devices or smart everyday objects can be localized and traced, and when various objects we use daily report their state and sensor information to other objects. The repercussions of such an extensive integration of computer technology into our everyday lives as Pervasive Computing advocates it, are difficult to predict and only time will tell whether this technology does contribute to a better and more enjoyable world or, on the contrary, promote a more totalitarian regime.", 
    "editor": [
      {
        "familyName": "Hutter", 
        "givenName": "Dieter", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "M\u00fcller", 
        "givenName": "G\u00fcnter", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Stephan", 
        "givenName": "Werner", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Ullmann", 
        "givenName": "Markus", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "genre": "chapter", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": {
      "isbn": [
        "978-3-540-20887-7", 
        "978-3-540-39881-3"
      ], 
      "name": "Security in Pervasive Computing", 
      "type": "Book"
    }, 
    "keywords": [
      "pervasive computing", 
      "everyday objects", 
      "smart everyday objects", 
      "use of networks", 
      "smart objects", 
      "networked objects", 
      "human users", 
      "today's Internet", 
      "smart devices", 
      "wireless networks", 
      "mobile processors", 
      "sensor information", 
      "spontaneous networks", 
      "computer science", 
      "computing", 
      "useful services", 
      "computer technology", 
      "communication technologies", 
      "huge amount", 
      "physical world", 
      "new services", 
      "cheap sensors", 
      "ultimate vision", 
      "Internet", 
      "network", 
      "objects", 
      "processors", 
      "Moore's law", 
      "communication engineering", 
      "extensive integration", 
      "household appliances", 
      "vision", 
      "technology", 
      "services", 
      "things", 
      "privacy", 
      "entire industry", 
      "information", 
      "users", 
      "primary concern", 
      "devices", 
      "environment", 
      "mundane things", 
      "infrastructure", 
      "microprocessor", 
      "Smart", 
      "scientific community", 
      "original purpose", 
      "communication", 
      "electrical devices", 
      "billions", 
      "Connected", 
      "technological hurdles", 
      "appliances", 
      "everyday life", 
      "new era", 
      "sensors", 
      "world", 
      "integration", 
      "tool", 
      "engineering", 
      "car", 
      "system", 
      "world of things", 
      "issues", 
      "science", 
      "orders of magnitude", 
      "social level", 
      "dramatic improvement", 
      "toys", 
      "order", 
      "industry", 
      "progress", 
      "hurdles", 
      "only time", 
      "pencil", 
      "improvement", 
      "power", 
      "clothes", 
      "era", 
      "time", 
      "use", 
      "community", 
      "technical progress", 
      "purpose", 
      "fact", 
      "concern", 
      "amount", 
      "state", 
      "law", 
      "firm belief", 
      "materials science", 
      "prospects", 
      "addition", 
      "years", 
      "values", 
      "life", 
      "levels", 
      "magnitude", 
      "beliefs", 
      "rise", 
      "repercussions", 
      "contrary", 
      "regime", 
      "age", 
      "totalitarian regimes", 
      "such mundane things", 
      "further dramatic improvements", 
      "current technological hurdles", 
      "enjoyable world", 
      "Pervasive Computing \u2013 Everything Smart", 
      "Computing \u2013 Everything Smart", 
      "Everything Connected"
    ], 
    "name": "The Age of Pervasive Computing \u2013 Everything Smart, Everything Connected?", 
    "pagination": "1-1", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1045134190"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "publisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature", 
      "type": "Organisation"
    }, 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045134190"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "chapters", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-01-01T19:20", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220101/entities/gbq_results/chapter/chapter_349.jsonl", 
    "type": "Chapter", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

188 TRIPLES      23 PREDICATES      139 URIs      132 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1 schema:about anzsrc-for:08
2 anzsrc-for:0806
3 schema:author Nc2699694e6c34fc6802d08523fb68420
4 schema:datePublished 2004
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2004-01-01
6 schema:description Given the continuing technical progress in computing and communication, it seems that we are heading towards an all-encompassing use of networks and computing power, a new era commonly termed ”Pervasive Computing”. Its vision is grounded in the firm belief amongst the scientific community that Moore’s Law (i.e. the observation that the computer power available on a chip approximately doubles every eighteen months) will hold true for at least another 10 years. This means that in the next few years, microprocessors will become so small and inexpensive that they can be embedded in almost everything – not only electrical devices, cars, household appliances, toys, and tools, but also such mundane things as pencils (e.g. to digitize everything we draw) and clothes. All these devices will be interwoven and connected together by wireless networks. In fact, technology is expected to make further dramatic improvements, which means that eventually billions of tiny and mobile processors will occupy the environment and be incorporated into many objects of the physical world.Together with powerful and cheap sensors (and thus the ability to sense the environment), this progress in processor and communication technology will render everyday objects ”smart” – they know where they are, and they may adapt to the environment and provide useful services in addition to their original purpose. These smart objects may form spontaneous networks, giving rise to a world-wide distributed system several orders of magnitude larger than today’s Internet.It is clear that we are moving only gradually towards the ultimate vision of Pervasive Computing. Much progress in computer science, communication engineering, and material science is necessary to render the vision economically feasible and to overcome current technological hurdles. However, the prospects of a world of things that virtually talk to each other are fascinating: many new services would then be possible that transform the huge amount of information gathered by the smart devices into value for the human user, and an entire industry may be set up to establish and run the underlying infrastructure for the smart and networked objects.Clearly, there are also many issues on the political, legal, and social level to consider. Privacy is certainly a primary concern when devices or smart everyday objects can be localized and traced, and when various objects we use daily report their state and sensor information to other objects. The repercussions of such an extensive integration of computer technology into our everyday lives as Pervasive Computing advocates it, are difficult to predict and only time will tell whether this technology does contribute to a better and more enjoyable world or, on the contrary, promote a more totalitarian regime.
7 schema:editor Nc5f2e38e46884f79a59ce681bc592a99
8 schema:genre chapter
9 schema:inLanguage en
10 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
11 schema:isPartOf N02c9b3df6ba8484a9ca88510ead45254
12 schema:keywords Computing – Everything Smart
13 Connected
14 Everything Connected
15 Internet
16 Moore's law
17 Pervasive Computing – Everything Smart
18 Smart
19 addition
20 age
21 amount
22 appliances
23 beliefs
24 billions
25 car
26 cheap sensors
27 clothes
28 communication
29 communication engineering
30 communication technologies
31 community
32 computer science
33 computer technology
34 computing
35 concern
36 contrary
37 current technological hurdles
38 devices
39 dramatic improvement
40 electrical devices
41 engineering
42 enjoyable world
43 entire industry
44 environment
45 era
46 everyday life
47 everyday objects
48 extensive integration
49 fact
50 firm belief
51 further dramatic improvements
52 household appliances
53 huge amount
54 human users
55 hurdles
56 improvement
57 industry
58 information
59 infrastructure
60 integration
61 issues
62 law
63 levels
64 life
65 magnitude
66 materials science
67 microprocessor
68 mobile processors
69 mundane things
70 network
71 networked objects
72 new era
73 new services
74 objects
75 only time
76 order
77 orders of magnitude
78 original purpose
79 pencil
80 pervasive computing
81 physical world
82 power
83 primary concern
84 privacy
85 processors
86 progress
87 prospects
88 purpose
89 regime
90 repercussions
91 rise
92 science
93 scientific community
94 sensor information
95 sensors
96 services
97 smart devices
98 smart everyday objects
99 smart objects
100 social level
101 spontaneous networks
102 state
103 such mundane things
104 system
105 technical progress
106 technological hurdles
107 technology
108 things
109 time
110 today's Internet
111 tool
112 totalitarian regimes
113 toys
114 ultimate vision
115 use
116 use of networks
117 useful services
118 users
119 values
120 vision
121 wireless networks
122 world
123 world of things
124 years
125 schema:name The Age of Pervasive Computing – Everything Smart, Everything Connected?
126 schema:pagination 1-1
127 schema:productId N0ee5971c41e642a79d9b889a5c670752
128 N3ad786c1447141c38c47403fcc393d28
129 schema:publisher N1ab296e25ea144be925ae39e917d6bb0
130 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1045134190
131 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1
132 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-01-01T19:20
133 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
134 schema:sdPublisher N9d66ba00f4af4e33b6d8a7946cb10b22
135 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1
136 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
137 sgo:sdDataset chapters
138 rdf:type schema:Chapter
139 N01c581bc7df74e80a3f13d3a4adee56a schema:familyName Hutter
140 schema:givenName Dieter
141 rdf:type schema:Person
142 N02c9b3df6ba8484a9ca88510ead45254 schema:isbn 978-3-540-20887-7
143 978-3-540-39881-3
144 schema:name Security in Pervasive Computing
145 rdf:type schema:Book
146 N0ee5971c41e642a79d9b889a5c670752 schema:name dimensions_id
147 schema:value pub.1045134190
148 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
149 N0f8e5705c6e64432b4e18dbcdfb6359e schema:familyName Müller
150 schema:givenName Günter
151 rdf:type schema:Person
152 N1ab296e25ea144be925ae39e917d6bb0 schema:name Springer Nature
153 rdf:type schema:Organisation
154 N3ad786c1447141c38c47403fcc393d28 schema:name doi
155 schema:value 10.1007/978-3-540-39881-3_1
156 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
157 N518976556f3f4094b220f119f5203341 schema:familyName Ullmann
158 schema:givenName Markus
159 rdf:type schema:Person
160 N6a49203c8cc84fb3839edabf3f64a0a6 rdf:first N9d3b997a11b64960a8ec91bc1fc0ee32
161 rdf:rest N902c4f830d234c529b5c5b22484e1a45
162 N902c4f830d234c529b5c5b22484e1a45 rdf:first N518976556f3f4094b220f119f5203341
163 rdf:rest rdf:nil
164 N9d3b997a11b64960a8ec91bc1fc0ee32 schema:familyName Stephan
165 schema:givenName Werner
166 rdf:type schema:Person
167 N9d66ba00f4af4e33b6d8a7946cb10b22 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
168 rdf:type schema:Organization
169 N9ecba2fad6c04287863ef86e0a4e6573 rdf:first N0f8e5705c6e64432b4e18dbcdfb6359e
170 rdf:rest N6a49203c8cc84fb3839edabf3f64a0a6
171 Nc2699694e6c34fc6802d08523fb68420 rdf:first sg:person.012317614157.00
172 rdf:rest rdf:nil
173 Nc5f2e38e46884f79a59ce681bc592a99 rdf:first N01c581bc7df74e80a3f13d3a4adee56a
174 rdf:rest N9ecba2fad6c04287863ef86e0a4e6573
175 anzsrc-for:08 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
176 schema:name Information and Computing Sciences
177 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
178 anzsrc-for:0806 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
179 schema:name Information Systems
180 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
181 sg:person.012317614157.00 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.5801.c
182 schema:familyName Mattern
183 schema:givenName Friedemann
184 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.012317614157.00
185 rdf:type schema:Person
186 grid-institutes:grid.5801.c schema:alternateName Institute for Pervasive Computing, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
187 schema:name Institute for Pervasive Computing, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
188 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...