Innate Immunity to Nanomaterials View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2018-05-26

AUTHORS

Dong Soo Lee , Young Kee Shin

ABSTRACT

Nanomaterials, if injected to the body systemically, will meet circulating innate immune mediators first and then tissue-resident macrophages. In this chapter, the recent development of the understanding of the innate immunity, mostly the origin and contribution of tissue-resident macrophages was explained. Interestingly, recently tissue-resident macrophages, major player of innate immunity are not derived from circulating monocyte, especially in liver. Tissue resident-macrophages, which are in non-activated state and will act as first-hand gatekeeper to respond to the injected nanomaterials. This innate immunity has the capability of memory and trainability, which means on the second injection, the degree of response will be higher. This trained innate immunity is now known to be meditated by epigenetic modification. Accelerated blood clearance is the minor and benign aftereffect of the action of innate immune response and the activation of pentraxin and complement system or provocation of humoral or cellular adaptive immune response is the consequential aftereffect of immune responses to the nanomaterials. The differentiation between innate and adaptive immunity lies in the presence or absence of involvement of major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules and of V(D)J recombination in effector cells and molecules (Immunoglobulins or T cell receptors). As is expected, circulation physiology predates immune response and thus one can refer to the anatomy of liver and spleen detailed in the chapter to predict the fate and final disposal of injected nanomaterials. More... »

PAGES

389-407

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-3-319-67720-0_21

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-67720-0_21

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1104232190


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