Chlorophyll-Xanthophyll Antenna Complexes: In Between Light Harvesting and Energy Dissipation View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2020-06-04

AUTHORS

Christo Schiphorst , Roberto Bassi

ABSTRACT

Photosynthetic organisms face a constant dilemma: harvesting as much light as possible while minimizing damage when in excess light conditions. Environmental conditions reproducibly change during the day while sudden light changes superimpose due to shading and require quick responses to ensure maximal growth. Pigment-binding antenna proteins fulfil both roles by ensuring efficient light harvesting, funnelling excitation energy towards the reaction centres while dissipating excess energy in the form of heat when necessary and scavenging high energy species as a further defence. Oxygenic organisms exhibit a highly diversified complement of antenna proteins in striking contrast with the photosynthetic reaction centres, which are highly conserved. This can be attributed to the adaptation to different light regimes found on Earth. Of particular importance is the mechanism called Non-Photochemical Quenching (NPQ) catalyzing energy dissipation by regulating the interactions between chlorophylls and carotenoids, likely by multiple reactions involving excited states. During the evolution different proteins have fulfilled this function including LHCSR, found in most algae, until PSBS evolved in advanced green algae and replaced LHCSR in higher plants. More... »

PAGES

27-55

Book

TITLE

Photosynthesis in Algae: Biochemical and Physiological Mechanisms

ISBN

978-3-030-33396-6
978-3-030-33397-3

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-3-030-33397-3_3

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-33397-3_3

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1128191667


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