Meats, Protein and Cancer View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

2010-03-19

AUTHORS

Gunter G.C. Kuhnle , Sheila A. Bingham

ABSTRACT

Key Points1. Several studies showed that dietary red meat, not white meat, was associated with a statistically significant increased risk for cancer of the esophagus, colon, lung and pancreas with an estimated risk increase of 29% per 100 g red meat and 21% per 50 g processed meat.2. In randomised controlled diet intervention studies, it was shown that intake of red and processed meats, but not white meat, was associated with an increase in endogenously formed nitroso compounds, many of which are known carcinogens. This was concluded because the combined actions of heme, found in high concentrations in red meat, and free thiol groups can promote the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds.3. Epidemiological studies have shown that changes in anaerobic fermentation related to dietary fiber can exert protective effects against meat-induced risk for colorectal cancer. A plausible explanation is that hydroxyl groups in fiber may scavenge nitrosating species and thus prevent the endogenous formation of nitroso compounds.4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are potentially carcinogenic chemical compounds that consist of fused aromatic rings and do not contain heteroatoms or carry substituents. They are products of incomplete combustion of organic matter and are present in most foods as a result of environmental contamination. PAH is found in relatively high concentrations in meat that is cooked over an open flame, due to the pyrolysis of the fat. The amount of PAHs produced is dependent upon the fat content in the meat and the temperature and proximity of the heat used to cook it. Lower cooking temperatures generally do not produce excessive amounts of PAHs.5. The WCRF recommended that meat intake should be reduced to an average of 300 g/week with as little intake of processed meat as possible. Meat should be prepared carefully to avoid the formation of carcinogens such as HCA and PAH. The formation of these compounds can be avoided by using lower cooking temperatures and changing the concentration of carcinogenic precursors by marinating or reducing the amount of available water. More... »

PAGES

195-212

Book

TITLE

Bioactive Compounds and Cancer

ISBN

978-1-60761-626-9
978-1-60761-627-6

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038947736


Indexing Status Check whether this publication has been indexed by Scopus and Web Of Science using the SN Indexing Status Tool
Incoming Citations Browse incoming citations for this publication using opencitations.net

JSON-LD is the canonical representation for SciGraph data.

TIP: You can open this SciGraph record using an external JSON-LD service: JSON-LD Playground Google SDTT

[
  {
    "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", 
    "about": [
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/11", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Medical and Health Sciences", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }, 
      {
        "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/1111", 
        "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", 
        "name": "Nutrition and Dietetics", 
        "type": "DefinedTerm"
      }
    ], 
    "author": [
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Medical Research Council, Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, UK", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.415055.0", 
          "name": [
            "Medical Research Council, Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, UK"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Kuhnle", 
        "givenName": "Gunter G.C.", 
        "id": "sg:person.01303262370.59", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01303262370.59"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "affiliation": {
          "alternateName": "Medical Research Council, Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, UK", 
          "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.415055.0", 
          "name": [
            "Medical Research Council, Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, UK"
          ], 
          "type": "Organization"
        }, 
        "familyName": "Bingham", 
        "givenName": "Sheila A.", 
        "id": "sg:person.07673616057.86", 
        "sameAs": [
          "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.07673616057.86"
        ], 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "datePublished": "2010-03-19", 
    "datePublishedReg": "2010-03-19", 
    "description": "Key Points1. Several studies showed that dietary red meat, not white meat, was associated with a statistically significant increased risk for cancer of the esophagus, colon, lung and pancreas with an estimated risk increase of 29% per 100\u00a0g red meat and 21% per 50\u00a0g processed meat.2. In randomised controlled diet intervention studies, it was shown that intake of red and processed meats, but not white meat, was associated with an increase in endogenously formed nitroso compounds, many of which are known carcinogens. This was concluded because the combined actions of heme, found in high concentrations in red meat, and free thiol groups can promote the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds.3. Epidemiological studies have shown that changes in anaerobic fermentation related to dietary fiber can exert protective effects against meat-induced risk for colorectal cancer. A plausible explanation is that hydroxyl groups in fiber may scavenge nitrosating species and thus prevent the endogenous formation of nitroso compounds.4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are potentially carcinogenic chemical compounds that consist of fused aromatic rings and do not contain heteroatoms or carry substituents. They are products of incomplete combustion of organic matter and are present in most foods as a result of environmental contamination. PAH is found in relatively high concentrations in meat that is cooked over an open flame, due to the pyrolysis of the fat. The amount of PAHs produced is dependent upon the fat content in the meat and the temperature and proximity of the heat used to cook it. Lower cooking temperatures generally do not produce excessive amounts of PAHs.5. The WCRF recommended that meat intake should be reduced to an average of 300\u00a0g/week with as little intake of processed meat as possible. Meat should be prepared carefully to avoid the formation of carcinogens such as HCA and PAH. The formation of these compounds can be avoided by using lower cooking temperatures and changing the concentration of carcinogenic precursors by marinating or reducing the amount of available water.", 
    "editor": [
      {
        "familyName": "Milner", 
        "givenName": "John A.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }, 
      {
        "familyName": "Romagnolo", 
        "givenName": "Donato F.", 
        "type": "Person"
      }
    ], 
    "genre": "chapter", 
    "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10", 
    "inLanguage": "en", 
    "isAccessibleForFree": false, 
    "isPartOf": {
      "isbn": [
        "978-1-60761-626-9", 
        "978-1-60761-627-6"
      ], 
      "name": "Bioactive Compounds and Cancer", 
      "type": "Book"
    }, 
    "keywords": [
      "red meat", 
      "dietary red meat", 
      "diet intervention study", 
      "white meat", 
      "formation of carcinogens", 
      "endogenous formation", 
      "colorectal cancer", 
      "meat intake", 
      "protective effect", 
      "little intake", 
      "nitroso compounds", 
      "epidemiological studies", 
      "intervention studies", 
      "carcinogenic precursors", 
      "cancer", 
      "risk increase", 
      "intake", 
      "dietary fiber", 
      "carcinogenic chemical compounds", 
      "high concentrations", 
      "carcinogens", 
      "risk", 
      "most foods", 
      "fat content", 
      "excessive amounts", 
      "group", 
      "esophagus", 
      "lung", 
      "colon", 
      "pancreas", 
      "meat", 
      "study", 
      "weeks", 
      "fat", 
      "WCRF", 
      "concentration", 
      "increase", 
      "environmental contamination", 
      "free thiol groups", 
      "nitrosating species", 
      "polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons", 
      "food", 
      "HCA", 
      "protein", 
      "plausible explanation", 
      "chemical compounds", 
      "fibers", 
      "action", 
      "compounds", 
      "effect", 
      "changes", 
      "thiol groups", 
      "average", 
      "amount", 
      "open flame", 
      "formation", 
      "results", 
      "heme", 
      "precursors", 
      "contamination", 
      "aromatic hydrocarbons", 
      "cooking temperature", 
      "proximity", 
      "content", 
      "explanation", 
      "products", 
      "incomplete combustion", 
      "matter", 
      "fused aromatic rings", 
      "species", 
      "amount of PAHs", 
      "fermentation", 
      "ring", 
      "hydroxyl groups", 
      "lower cooking temperatures", 
      "water", 
      "substituents", 
      "anaerobic fermentation", 
      "aromatic ring", 
      "heat", 
      "hydrocarbons", 
      "temperature", 
      "organic matter", 
      "heteroatoms", 
      "flame", 
      "combustion", 
      "available water", 
      "pyrolysis"
    ], 
    "name": "Meats, Protein and Cancer", 
    "pagination": "195-212", 
    "productId": [
      {
        "name": "dimensions_id", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "pub.1038947736"
        ]
      }, 
      {
        "name": "doi", 
        "type": "PropertyValue", 
        "value": [
          "10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10"
        ]
      }
    ], 
    "publisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature", 
      "type": "Organisation"
    }, 
    "sameAs": [
      "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10", 
      "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038947736"
    ], 
    "sdDataset": "chapters", 
    "sdDatePublished": "2022-06-01T22:32", 
    "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", 
    "sdPublisher": {
      "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", 
      "type": "Organization"
    }, 
    "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220601/entities/gbq_results/chapter/chapter_317.jsonl", 
    "type": "Chapter", 
    "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10"
  }
]
 

Download the RDF metadata as:  json-ld nt turtle xml License info

HOW TO GET THIS DATA PROGRAMMATICALLY:

JSON-LD is a popular format for linked data which is fully compatible with JSON.

curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10'

N-Triples is a line-based linked data format ideal for batch operations.

curl -H 'Accept: application/n-triples' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10'

Turtle is a human-readable linked data format.

curl -H 'Accept: text/turtle' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10'

RDF/XML is a standard XML format for linked data.

curl -H 'Accept: application/rdf+xml' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10'


 

This table displays all metadata directly associated to this object as RDF triples.

160 TRIPLES      23 PREDICATES      113 URIs      106 LITERALS      7 BLANK NODES

Subject Predicate Object
1 sg:pub.10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10 schema:about anzsrc-for:11
2 anzsrc-for:1111
3 schema:author Ncf7a0062ed7f4d4dbd3d7033cc67d664
4 schema:datePublished 2010-03-19
5 schema:datePublishedReg 2010-03-19
6 schema:description Key Points1. Several studies showed that dietary red meat, not white meat, was associated with a statistically significant increased risk for cancer of the esophagus, colon, lung and pancreas with an estimated risk increase of 29% per 100 g red meat and 21% per 50 g processed meat.2. In randomised controlled diet intervention studies, it was shown that intake of red and processed meats, but not white meat, was associated with an increase in endogenously formed nitroso compounds, many of which are known carcinogens. This was concluded because the combined actions of heme, found in high concentrations in red meat, and free thiol groups can promote the endogenous formation of N-nitroso compounds.3. Epidemiological studies have shown that changes in anaerobic fermentation related to dietary fiber can exert protective effects against meat-induced risk for colorectal cancer. A plausible explanation is that hydroxyl groups in fiber may scavenge nitrosating species and thus prevent the endogenous formation of nitroso compounds.4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are potentially carcinogenic chemical compounds that consist of fused aromatic rings and do not contain heteroatoms or carry substituents. They are products of incomplete combustion of organic matter and are present in most foods as a result of environmental contamination. PAH is found in relatively high concentrations in meat that is cooked over an open flame, due to the pyrolysis of the fat. The amount of PAHs produced is dependent upon the fat content in the meat and the temperature and proximity of the heat used to cook it. Lower cooking temperatures generally do not produce excessive amounts of PAHs.5. The WCRF recommended that meat intake should be reduced to an average of 300 g/week with as little intake of processed meat as possible. Meat should be prepared carefully to avoid the formation of carcinogens such as HCA and PAH. The formation of these compounds can be avoided by using lower cooking temperatures and changing the concentration of carcinogenic precursors by marinating or reducing the amount of available water.
7 schema:editor N9f4a335932cb4f3ba4ced0ee498779ed
8 schema:genre chapter
9 schema:inLanguage en
10 schema:isAccessibleForFree false
11 schema:isPartOf N14cea01d8df64c77bd6f7b2ec7872997
12 schema:keywords HCA
13 WCRF
14 action
15 amount
16 amount of PAHs
17 anaerobic fermentation
18 aromatic hydrocarbons
19 aromatic ring
20 available water
21 average
22 cancer
23 carcinogenic chemical compounds
24 carcinogenic precursors
25 carcinogens
26 changes
27 chemical compounds
28 colon
29 colorectal cancer
30 combustion
31 compounds
32 concentration
33 contamination
34 content
35 cooking temperature
36 diet intervention study
37 dietary fiber
38 dietary red meat
39 effect
40 endogenous formation
41 environmental contamination
42 epidemiological studies
43 esophagus
44 excessive amounts
45 explanation
46 fat
47 fat content
48 fermentation
49 fibers
50 flame
51 food
52 formation
53 formation of carcinogens
54 free thiol groups
55 fused aromatic rings
56 group
57 heat
58 heme
59 heteroatoms
60 high concentrations
61 hydrocarbons
62 hydroxyl groups
63 incomplete combustion
64 increase
65 intake
66 intervention studies
67 little intake
68 lower cooking temperatures
69 lung
70 matter
71 meat
72 meat intake
73 most foods
74 nitrosating species
75 nitroso compounds
76 open flame
77 organic matter
78 pancreas
79 plausible explanation
80 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
81 precursors
82 products
83 protective effect
84 protein
85 proximity
86 pyrolysis
87 red meat
88 results
89 ring
90 risk
91 risk increase
92 species
93 study
94 substituents
95 temperature
96 thiol groups
97 water
98 weeks
99 white meat
100 schema:name Meats, Protein and Cancer
101 schema:pagination 195-212
102 schema:productId N58998b8842ce4d408ef1c9e2b372a850
103 N5f85f9d4dab440ed80f230ca166423e1
104 schema:publisher N9b71a7af41224784900b22dcffe0af50
105 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1038947736
106 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10
107 schema:sdDatePublished 2022-06-01T22:32
108 schema:sdLicense https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/
109 schema:sdPublisher Ne388c53f6e114d71b88d259eb9348456
110 schema:url https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10
111 sgo:license sg:explorer/license/
112 sgo:sdDataset chapters
113 rdf:type schema:Chapter
114 N14cea01d8df64c77bd6f7b2ec7872997 schema:isbn 978-1-60761-626-9
115 978-1-60761-627-6
116 schema:name Bioactive Compounds and Cancer
117 rdf:type schema:Book
118 N48e5867ef00e41b6a13fc4d413e0432f schema:familyName Romagnolo
119 schema:givenName Donato F.
120 rdf:type schema:Person
121 N57bf0e03b02649abb9904e7b5aa6bb9d rdf:first N48e5867ef00e41b6a13fc4d413e0432f
122 rdf:rest rdf:nil
123 N58998b8842ce4d408ef1c9e2b372a850 schema:name dimensions_id
124 schema:value pub.1038947736
125 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
126 N5f85f9d4dab440ed80f230ca166423e1 schema:name doi
127 schema:value 10.1007/978-1-60761-627-6_10
128 rdf:type schema:PropertyValue
129 N9b71a7af41224784900b22dcffe0af50 schema:name Springer Nature
130 rdf:type schema:Organisation
131 N9f4a335932cb4f3ba4ced0ee498779ed rdf:first Ne56554aede1646f4b39368c24ee8e867
132 rdf:rest N57bf0e03b02649abb9904e7b5aa6bb9d
133 Na5ab8cfd6ee84168a1cda14a38e3b3ee rdf:first sg:person.07673616057.86
134 rdf:rest rdf:nil
135 Ncf7a0062ed7f4d4dbd3d7033cc67d664 rdf:first sg:person.01303262370.59
136 rdf:rest Na5ab8cfd6ee84168a1cda14a38e3b3ee
137 Ne388c53f6e114d71b88d259eb9348456 schema:name Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project
138 rdf:type schema:Organization
139 Ne56554aede1646f4b39368c24ee8e867 schema:familyName Milner
140 schema:givenName John A.
141 rdf:type schema:Person
142 anzsrc-for:11 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
143 schema:name Medical and Health Sciences
144 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
145 anzsrc-for:1111 schema:inDefinedTermSet anzsrc-for:
146 schema:name Nutrition and Dietetics
147 rdf:type schema:DefinedTerm
148 sg:person.01303262370.59 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.415055.0
149 schema:familyName Kuhnle
150 schema:givenName Gunter G.C.
151 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01303262370.59
152 rdf:type schema:Person
153 sg:person.07673616057.86 schema:affiliation grid-institutes:grid.415055.0
154 schema:familyName Bingham
155 schema:givenName Sheila A.
156 schema:sameAs https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.07673616057.86
157 rdf:type schema:Person
158 grid-institutes:grid.415055.0 schema:alternateName Medical Research Council, Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, UK
159 schema:name Medical Research Council, Dunn Human Nutrition Unit, Cambridge, UK
160 rdf:type schema:Organization
 




Preview window. Press ESC to close (or click here)


...