Transillumination Imaging View Full Text


Ontology type: schema:Chapter     


Chapter Info

DATE

1991

AUTHORS

P. C. Jackson , H. Key , P. N. T. Wells

ABSTRACT

The use of transillumination imaging as a non-invasive tumour detection technique of the breast was first described by Cutler (1929). In this early work an electric torch was held against the underside of the breast and the observer viewed the regionally attenuated light from the opposing surface of the breast. The transmitted intensities of light were low since the limiting factor for the light output used was the necessity to avoid burning the patient’s skin or causing discomfort. This resulted in the examination being performed in a darkened room and the observer having to undergo dark adaptation. The technique, however, demonstrated that blood vessels and tumours would preferentially absorb more light than surrounding tissue and project ‘dark areas’. Conversely, cystic structures appeared to transmit light more readily than normal tissue and resulted in ‘light areas’ being visualised. These observations were the basis for all subsequent work and mainly applied to investigation of the breast. Although Cutler demonstrated the potential for breast transillumination as a diagnostic technique it was not until Gros et al (1972) developed a water cooled lamp with a filter to remove wavelengths less than 0.6 µm, that high intensity light transmissions were possible which enabled photographs to be satisfactorily recorded. More... »

PAGES

101-115

Book

TITLE

Optronic Techniques in Diagnostic and Therapeutic Medicine

ISBN

978-1-4613-6678-2
978-1-4615-3766-3

Identifiers

URI

http://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-1-4615-3766-3_8

DOI

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4615-3766-3_8

DIMENSIONS

https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1019407944


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